Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, Looney said:

You say that as if I am not worthy.  :P

I will certainly admit that I have not seen enough Noir and I claim no expertise.  For some reason the only thing that stands out where Andrews really impressed me was THE OX-BOW INCIDENT (1942).  It is true, though, I've only seen a handful of Andrew's films.  

And in my humble defense of not seeing enough Noir or Andrews films, I pretty much watch everything.  I am only lacking in the Noir category because there are FAR too many categories to cover.  The only reason I post so much here is because Noir Alley has become a TCM event I can usually fit into my schedule every week.  If I didn't have to work or be around other people I would likely spend 8 hours a day watching TCM and coming to these boards to talk about various films and genres.  But we can't always have what we wish for so I try to focus on this because I love the films so much as well as Eddie's comments . . . .  oh and I like all of you  . . . well most of you.  :P

(I'm not going to lie I literally had to fight the urge to laugh out loud after writing that.  Sometimes I amuse myself WAY too much.  I hope you all take that for the joke it was, except . . . LOL)

Looney: I'm sorry you took my earlier post to you as a bit of a dig. It did occur to me, after I wrote it, that it probably looked that way, but I'd already posted it by then and didn't want to take the time to go back and edit /rewrite it.

Listen, I think anyone who's interested in these old movies is "worthy". Of course a person has to start somewhere - it's not like we're born already being familiar with classic films, (or anything else for that matter -sorry to make such an obvious statement....)  So I think anyone who for whatever reason, who's a "newbie" to old movies, whether they're "noirs" or anything else, is to be applauded for taking an interest and deciding to learn more about them. 

And I suspect I'm a fair bit older than you, so I've had years to seek out these kinds of films. I certainly don't expect the average person, even the average old movie fan, to know a whole lot about Dana Andrews (or any other "classic era" actor). It takes a while to learn about them, and I think it's great that you're making the effort to watch these kinds of films and learn about them.

I guess I was a little snarky -again, sorry about that - because I actually am a particular fan of Dana Andrews. It's true, as I think "kingrat" (a very knowledgable poster here on these boards) observed, some people might think Dana is sometimes a bit "wooden". I've never found that to be so about him, I think he was a really fine actor, and an under-rated one. But it may be that you, like "kingrat" and maybe other old movie fans, think he fits that description.

Anyway, I'm glad you realized how good he was in The Oxbow Incident. You also might want to check out his most famous film, The Best Years of Our Lives. TCM airs it pretty frequently, so keep your eye out for it. It's a very good movie, even apart from Andrews' performance in it.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

I guess I was a little snarky -again, sorry about that - because I actually am a particular fan of Dana Andrews. It's true, as I think "kingrat" (a very knowledgable poster here on these boards) observed, some people might think Dana is sometimes a bit "wooden". I've never found that to be so about him, I think he was a really fine actor, and an under-rated one. But it may be that you, like "kingrat" and maybe other old movie fans, think he fits that description.

I wonder how much the perception of an actor is shaped,  in a viewer's mind,  by the actors they have seen before.

To me Andrews isn't a bit "wooden" but say someone had watched a lot of 30s Cagney films and some of the other 30s actors who had very lively screen personas (especially early 30s where the industry was still getting-its-feet-wet in the transitioning to talking pictures).      The more stoic 40s actors might appear a bit "wooden" in comparison. 

Just a theory.    

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/22/2019 at 10:41 AM, cigarjoe said:

Dana Andrews isn't bad in Transitional Noir Brainstorm either, it's worth a look.

In fact, I remember thinking all four principal actors were pretty good in this little remembered film, CJ, and after I happened to catch it on TCM some years back.

(...Andrews, Jeff Hunter, Anne Francis and Viveca Lindfors) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

...You also might want to check out his most famous film, The Best Years of Our Lives. TCM airs it pretty frequently, so keep your eye out for it. It's a very good movie, even apart from Andrews' performance in it.

Saaaaay...whaddaya MEAN it's a "very good movie" here, lady???

Why, it's the very BEST movie EVER, don't you know?!

(...well okay, as you probably know, it's my FAVORITE movie ever, anyway)

;)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Dargo said:

Saaaaay...whaddaya MEAN it's a "very good movie" here, lady???

Why, it's the very BEST movie EVER, don't you know?!

(...well okay, as you probably know, it's my FAVORITE movie ever, anyway)

;)

The Best Years Of Our Lives is one my favorite films also Dargo. Dana Andrews performance ( everyone's performance) in this touching, beautiful film could not have been any better. I've seen this film so many times, never tire of it and get teary eyed each time I watch. Of all Dana Andrews' performances, this one is my favorite. 

How unfortunate for the poster who isn't inspired to see Dana Andrews in other films. Hard to believe and take seriously that poster's remark " I pretty much watch everything" when they haven't seen a Classic like The Best Years of Our Lives.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never particularly cared for The Best Years of Our Lives, but it is a good movie.  As for Dana Andrews, rather than wooden, perhaps understated or not overly energetic would be better description.  As for Cagney, have never liked him and do watch movies he is in.  He is too energetic, too overboard, too boisterous.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheCid said:

I have never particularly cared for The Best Years of Our Lives, but it is a good movie.  As for Dana Andrews, rather than wooden, perhaps understated or not overly energetic would be better description.  As for Cagney, have never liked him and do watch movies he is in.  He is too energetic, too overboard, too boisterous.

Maybe Robert Taylor is more your style?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/21/2019 at 10:52 AM, Looney said:

 

......    I haven't seen much of Dana Andrews' work and this film definitely did not inspire me to see more.

 

So, Looney, here's your chance...Laura is scheduled on TCM tonight at 9:30. It's one of Andrews' best and most famous films. It's very entertaining, I love it. Catch it if you can.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, TheCid said:

...As for Dana Andrews, rather than wooden, perhaps understated or not overly energetic would be better description...

Nope, you're right here, Cid. The ONLY "wooden" actor in ALL of While the City Sleeps would be that "poor man's Clark Gable" dude named James Craig.

Man, I swear, every time I see that guy in somethin', I'm reminded of what a lousy and stiff actor he was. Every time he opens his mouth in some flick it sounds to me like he's reciting his lines off the script for the very first time. And, his facial expressions, the few that he had, always seem so unnatural and faked, also.

(...yep, it was probably a good thing for this film that his part was limited to just a few scenes)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Nope, you're right here, Cid. The ONLY "wooden" actor in ALL of While the City Sleeps would be that "poor man's Clark Gable" dude named James Craig.

Man, I swear, every time I see that guy in somethin', I'm reminded of what a lousy and stiff actor he was. Every time he opens his mouth in some flick it sounds to me like he's reciting his lines off the script for the very first time. And, his facial expressions, the few that he had, always seem so unnatural and faked, also.

(...yep, it was probably a good thing for this film that his part was limited to just a few scenes)

The only film I can recall where James Craig gives a good performance is the Mickey Rooney crime film The Strip (1951).     Craig doesn't have a very big part as a mobster and the best part of the film is the fine jazz music by Armstrong and his band.    Still a fine film with some noir elements (mostly Rooney's fine performance).   

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

5 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

The better Rooney Noirs are Quicksand and Drive a Crooked Road

"Quicksand" is entertaining with Peter Lorre.

But "Drive a Crooked Road" is an outstanding flick.

It just kills me the way Kevin McCarthy and Jack Kelly conspire together to manipulate Rooney through a beautiful woman.

Also there's nice support from Paul Picerni.

And there are Good location Beach shots, good race car driving shots--

Not up to Richard Jaeckel in "The Line-Up" but what is? 

In "Drive a Crooked Road", I really forgot for the first time that I was watching Andy Hardy.

 Rooney put in a solid performance that shows you what he could have done with his career.

He could have been a Noir star-- if he had been only maybe five inches taller-- about the height of Alan Ladd?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The only film I can recall where James Craig gives a good performance is the Mickey Rooney crime film The Strip (1951).     Craig doesn't have a very big part as a mobster and the best part of the film is the fine jazz music by Armstrong and his band.    Still a fine film with some noir elements (mostly Rooney's fine performance).   

Yep, I suppose he's not bad in that one as the crooked mob boss, although he sure AIN'T no Sheldon Leonard in it, is he CJ?! ;) LOL

(...and btw, also including cute little Sally Forrest in the cast...although as I recall, she's not as nice a character in this one as she is in WTCS)

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Dargo said:

Yep, I suppose he's not bad in that one as the crooked mob boss, although he sure AIN'T no Sheldon Leonard in it, is he CJ?! ;) LOL

Dats Right!

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yep, I suppose he's not bad in that one as the crooked mob boss, although he sure AIN'T no Sheldon Leonard in it, is he CJ?! ;) LOL

(...and btw, also including cute little Sally Forrest in the cast...although as I recall, she's not as nice a character in this one as she is in WTCS)

 

I'd like to say something in James Craig's defense, sort of.

He saved Ginger Rogers from a disastrous end in "Kitty Foyle".

By picking James Craig over Dennis Morgan in the last scene, Ginger Rogers assured herself of a safe and dull life.

Which maybe she deserved after going through the wringer more than once with spoiled Rich Boy Dennis Morgan.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

I'd like to say something in James Craig's defense, sort of.

He saved Ginger Rogers from a disastrous end in "Kitty Foyle".

By picking James Craig over Dennis Morgan in the last scene, Ginger Rogers assured herself of a safe and dull life.

Which maybe she deserved after going through the wringer more than once with spoiled Rich Boy Dennis Morgan.

 

Ya know, and now that you bring up Craig's performance in Kitty Foyle here Princess, I have to say I don't think he's all that bad in that one either.

(...and perhaps it's because and as you suggest, he's perfectly cast as her dull suitor who she ends up settling for)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen James Craig in several movies, but his one performance that sticks with me is from The Human Comedy.  Because the whole movie is a bit stylized, Craig's somewhat stiff acting style seems to fit.  And I just like the nice-guy character he plays.

I can see why Louis B. Mayer thought Craig might be a wartime replacement for Clark Gable while the latter was in the Army Air Force.  Craig's voice and his appearance, especially with a mustache, do remind me of Clark.  But Gable was a much better actor, even if he didn't have much range.  The character he usually played -- himself -- was appealing, and he was very good at it.  James Craig didn't seem to inhabit his characters as much, at least in the movies I've seen him in.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

....He could have been a Noir star-- if he had been only maybe five inches taller-- about the height of Alan Ladd?

Yeah, well, even so Princess, Rooney could have maybe STILL added to some noirs and even IF he didn't play the lead in 'em, ya know.

Uh-huh, he could've played some of those parts that Percy Helton always got in 'em! ;)

(...doubt Mickey's noted enormous ego would've allowed him to, though)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just as long as no one speaks ill of the Cornbelt Loan and Trust Company. We are a forward

looking progressive institution interested to helping our returning veterans adjust to their new

life. To obtain a loan, we only ask that you undergo a background check only a little more

rigorous than that of an F.B.I. agent. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Just as long as no one speaks ill of the Cornbelt Loan and Trust Company. We are a forward

looking progressive institution interested to helping our returning veterans adjust to their new

life. To obtain a loan, we only ask that you undergo a background check only a little more

rigorous than that of an F.B.I. agent. 

Saaay, that's not a bad Ray Collins impression there, Vautrin! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

The better Rooney Noirs are Quicksand and Drive a Crooked Road

I agree those are better noirs than The Strip.    Like I said what I like the most about The Strip is the fine jazz music and the guest musicians.    

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Saaay, that's not a bad Ray Collins impression there, Vautrin! ;)

Well, you know what a bleeding heart softie old man Milton was.

You can find his descendants in most banks today. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Well, you know what a bleeding heart softie old man Milton was.

You can find his descendants in most banks today. 

And now conjuring up yet another great moment in this film...Al's welcome back from the war banquet speech scene.

(...love it)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Dargo said:

And now conjuring up yet another great moment in this film...Al's welcome back from the war banquet speech scene.

(...love it)

That was a good one. As March keeps on talking Ray Collins looks like he thinks a bomb might go

off at any minute. And Myrna Loy counting the drinks Al has had with a fork on the tablecloth.

IRL, Al would likely have gotten his pink slip next morning. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was able to borrow Ride the Pink Horse from the library. Really, 1939 gets all the hype (and I do love GWTW), but 1947 has far more films of continuing interest to me. I loved Ride the Pink Horse, an oddball, offbeat film noir that fits perfectly into 1947. The first film Robert Montgomery directed, The Lady in the Lake, is ambitious in its use of the point-of-view camera, but the experiment doesn't really work (the first part of Dark Passage uses this idea much more imaginatively, thanks to Delmer Daves). Dark Passage is another offbeat, oddball film from what year? 1947. Montgomery seems to have learned a lot about directing. The opening of the film, which is almost entirely visual, would do credit to any director. Russell Metty is the excellent cinematographer.

All six of the major performances are excellent. We don't always know much about these characters, but what we know is enough. Gagin, Montgomery's character, has to figure out who he can trust and how much. Some of these people will surprise him, both positively and negatively. Thomas Gomez won an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor for his performance as the carousel owner, but Fred Clark as the gangster who uses a hearing aid and Art Smith as the man who says he's a federal agent are equally good. Andrea King, so good in Hotel Berlin, once again plays a character whose character we aren't sure of, and Wanda Hendrix, brilliant in Confidential Agent, has the difficult role of a Native American girl who seems to have some mystic or psychic powers. This part could so easily be implausible or embarrassing, compounded by the fact that she seems too young to have a possible romantic interest in Montgomery, or does she? I'm sorry Hendrix didn't have a bigger career, because she is very talented. Montgomery himself gives a fine performance as the returning veteran and petty crook who wants to avenge a friend.

The film has a surprisingly violent scene for the times, and a disturbing scene for any time, as the children riding a merry-go-round see someone being beat up. I thought the film would end a different way; the actual ending is the kind that will leave you talking to your friends about it as you leave the theater. Some viewers will recognize the La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe. Santa Fe in 1947 was a very different place from the artsy and upscale city it is today. I particularly like to remember that this is close to how the town looked during WWII as a connection to the secret community of Los Alamos.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...