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As you are probably well aware, a turn around can be short-lived.  Especially when nobody goes downtown as planned during the off season.  I don't spend any time downtown there, but despite all kinds of recent renovations, I hear it's gone fairly unused overall.

 

P.S. Maybe if you tweaked The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942) to make it a bit more scary or paranoid, you'd end up with a Noir.  I think that was supposed to be set somewhere around Cleveland.

 

 

I havent been downtown in many years, but the theater district has completely turned around. Aside from that, there probably isnt much going on at night, aside from conventions in town, like many other cities that have to compete with suburban malls.......

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It was also interesting to hear Eddie note in his introduction that 1950 is, in his opinion, THE BEST YEAR FOR MOVIES IN THE HISTORY OF HOLLYWOOD, and here we are more simpatico (although, I personally have greater fondness in my shriveled black heart for 1940 and 1943 collectively.)

 

 

Thank you for the list Lorna.  A few others to consider adding are Gun Crazy, Side Street (on Noir Alley next month), Night and the City (Noir Alley in Nov.), The Breaking Point (Noir Alley in Dec.), and Born Yesterday (just kidding).

 

I see now that the problem with being the Czar of Noir is that everything you do has to be considered with a Noir bias - In a Lonely Place is your favorite film of all time, 1950 is the greatest year for Hollywood films, and Sam Fuller is "one of the greatest Americans of the 20th century" (find out why next week).

 

Noir Alley is a place that I love to visit, but I'm glad that I'm not stuck there forever.

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I see now that the problem with being the Czar of Noir is that everything you do has to be considered with a Noir bias - In a Lonely Place is your favorite film of all time, 1950 is the greatest year for Hollywood films, and Sam Fuller is "one of the greatest Americans of the 20th century" (find out why next week).

 

Noir Alley is a place that I love to visit, but I'm glad that I'm not stuck there forever.

 

I wonder how many fans of noir pretty much exclude themselves to that one movie genre. There are a few on these boards who seem to want to discuss that genre 99% of the time.

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DURF!!!

 

HOW COULD I FORGET "THE BREAKING POINT"?!?!?!

 

I hang my head in SHAME!

 

Ps- The exact release year of GUN CRAZY is one I'm unclear on, some sources list it as being released in 1949 and others in 1950...

 

Pss- laughed out loud at your BORN YESTERDAY comment. For the record, I really kind a wish they had taken a dark(er) turn with it.

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I wonder how many fans of noir pretty much exclude themselves to that one movie genre. There are a few on these boards who seem to want to discuss that genre 99% of the time.

 

I would hope no one would be so silly to 'pretty much exclude themselves to that one movie genre'.    That would be so limiting.

 

Eddie is a host and noir is his 'thing' and profession.   (I.e. what he makes his living at).     E.g. the professional jazz guitarist I know focus 99% of their professional life on jazz.  Same with the professional rock guitarist.

 

But even with Eddie I would hope he watches films from other genres.     

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I would hope no one would be so silly to 'pretty much exclude themselves to that one movie genre'.    That would be so limiting.

   

 

I agree that it's limiting. But I suspect that in some cases that may be the case. Let's put it this way, there are some posters you will rarely see make a contribution to these boards unless it's noir related.

 

I say it's time for Eddie Muller to lead the way for these film noir exclusives, leave those dark alleys for at least one day and burst out into tap dance and rousing rendition of "Singin' in the Rain." Even better if he's ready to run up a wall and flip backward in a tribute to Donald O'Connor's "Make 'Em Laugh" that would be great.

 

(Should Eddie fail to survive the backward flip, my apologies for the suggestion).

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Per Eddie: Sam Fuller is "one of the greatest Americans of the 20th century" (find out why next week).

 

Scandal Sheet with Broderick Crawford, Donna Reed and John Derek. Dir: Phil Carlson. Screenwriters:  Sherdeman, Ling, Poe and Fuller.  Not sure why it took four people to write screenplay based on a book by one of them.  The TCM description may be missing some punctuation.  It appears that Fuller wrote the book, but did not contribute to the screenplay itself?  Screenplay based on book by Fuller and Wim Winders(?) per Amazon.  Full (TCM) description of movie at site below.

 

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/27678/Scandal-Sheet/articles.html

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Scandal Sheet with Broderick Crawford, Donna Reed and John Derek. Dir: Phil Carlson. Screenwriters:  Sherdeman, Ling, Poe and Fuller.  Not sure why it took four people to write screenplay based on a book by one of them.  The TCM description may be missing some punctuation.  It appears that Fuller wrote the book, but did not contribute to the screenplay itself?  Screenplay based on book by Fuller and Wim Winders(?) per Amazon.  Full (TCM) description of movie at site below.

 

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/27678/Scandal-Sheet/articles.html

 

Fuller's book was The Dark Page. He wrote it when he was in the Army during WW2. It was later turned into the 1952 film Scandal Sheet. Fuller didn't work on the script. The screenplay was by Ted Sherdeman, Eugene Ling, and James Poe. I don't know why Wim Wenders, a German director born in 1945, has his name attached to that article, although he later directed a movie that Fuller acted in.

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Fuller's book was The Dark Page. He wrote it when he was in the Army during WW2. It was later turned into the 1952 film Scandal Sheet. Fuller didn't work on the script. The screenplay was by Ted Sherdeman, Eugene Ling, and James Poe. I don't know why Wim Wenders, a German director born in 1945, has his name attached to that article, although he later directed a movie that Fuller acted in.

 

I was going to say, Wim Wenders??? Had to be a child back then, if he had been born AT ALL.

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Thank you for the list Lorna.  A few others to consider adding are Gun Crazy, Side Street (on Noir Alley next month), Night and the City (Noir Alley in Nov.), The Breaking Point (Noir Alley in Dec.), and Born Yesterday (just kidding).

 

I see now that the problem with being the Czar of Noir is that everything you do has to be considered with a Noir bias - In a Lonely Place is your favorite film of all time, 1950 is the greatest year for Hollywood films, and Sam Fuller is "one of the greatest Americans of the 20th century" (find out why next week).

 

Noir Alley is a place that I love to visit, but I'm glad that I'm not stuck there forever.

Okay, seems like a good time to pop in and offer some clarification to the Noir Alley loyalists. YES—Eddie does have a life outside noir and I've even been known to engage in extended conversations that have nothing to do with movies! I don't think anybody is "stuck there forever." Hey, Noir Alley is only on once a week! I've introduced numerous non-noir films over the years at the TCM Classic Film Festival—Rebel Without a Cause, The Best Years of Our Lives, Brian's Song, The Heiress, The Party, etc. ... but TCM hired me to program and host a franchise dedicated to film noir—which, not coincidentally, I typically describe as "the gateway drug to classic cinema." A vitally important point when we're trying to hard to entice young people to take interest in older films. If my enthusiasm seems hyperbolic ("My favorite film," "my favorite American," etc ... remember: unlike Ben or Tiffany, I actually get to chose the films I present. Obviously, I'm going to select movies I genuinely admire and am passionate about, or that I think are deserving of more attention—and have good backstories that provide entertaining grist for intros and outros. FYI, I'm responsible for every word that comes out my mouth on TCM, including the Wine Club spots! Thanks for watching!

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Thanks for joining into the conversation, Eddie.

 

Your favourite film is In A Lonely Place. One of my great favourites is also from that same year, The Breaking Point. I look forward to your comments regarding that Michael Curtiz classic which I have always held is an infinitely more emotionally involving take on Hemingway's To Have and Have Not than was the far different and far better known Bogart-Hawks version.

 

Among other things, John Garfield brought a vulnerability to his flawed everyman Harry Morgan, nowhere to be seen with superhero Bogart in bantering sexy form with Bacall. Both films work well but the 1950 version is more haunting. That final crane shot of the little boy brings an unexpected poignancy and sensitivity to the film's ending. It's my understanding that that shot was Curtiz's idea.

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Eddie.  Watch the shows for your intro and outro as much as anything.  

It would be nice if when you are discussing the next show, you give us the title.  Or is there a reason you don't?  Used to be easy for me to just check out the printed Now Playing Guide but that has been replaced by the "still working on it" email NPG.

Now I have to remember to go to TCM and search it out on the schedule.

Thanks.

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Eddie.  Watch the shows for your intro and outro as much as anything.  

It would be nice if when you are discussing the next show, you give us the title.  Or is there a reason you don't?  Used to be easy for me to just check out the printed Now Playing Guide but that has been replaced by the "still working on it" email NPG.

Now I have to remember to go to TCM and search it out on the schedule.

Thanks.

 

Yes, I second that.........

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That is quite unexpected to have a post replied to by a TCM host.  Thank you Eddie for your passion and for making Noir Alley such a great series.  You are certainly entitled to your opinions and I hope that my message did not come off in a hurtful or disrespectful manner.

If I could grovel for a moment I would like to say that your presentations for Noir Alley have added back some of the charm and style that has been missing from TCM since Robert’s passing.  Even the Wine Club promos demonstrate this and make Ben’s attempt at the same look embarrassing (sorry, Ben).  That is why I wish TCM would hire you on a permanent basis and allow you to also host movies of a more general theme, a point which I had in mind when I posted my original message.  Of course, that assumes you would be interested in and available for an expanded role, something which may not be the case.

But thanks again for making Noir Alley so special.  At a minimum I hope TCM will arrange for us to enjoy an extension of the series next year.
 

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I wonder how many fans of noir pretty much exclude themselves to that one movie genre. There are a few on these boards who seem to want to discuss that genre 99% of the time.

I'm kind of guilty of this, more because I've overlooked them through the years. I grew up in the fifties, and was really inundated at a young age with Westerns and TV Westerns, there were a lot of Westerns on 50s prime time TV, also Laurel & Hardy, Abbott and Costello, Little Rascals/Our Gang, a lot of Million Dollar Movies, Chiller Theater, Horror Films, Gangster Films, I saw all the Tennessee Williams adaptations on film and also those on the Playhouse theater type shows,  Screwball Comedies, and Sword & Sandal Epics a lot of Hercules and Machiste films. 

 

Film Noir was barely defined back then, they were probably just labeled Crime Films if some of these films were on early TV they would have probably been on late night. I just don't remember them. I do remember The Maltese Falcon, and Key Largo.

 

You've seen a lot of films TCM shows on their regular rotation many times after watching TCM for 15+ years, so I particularly watch for possible noir.  I've seen quite a few and been trying to let other similar fans know when I come across a film that got lost in the shuffle.

 

Another strong point for Noirs is that at the end of the 40s more and more location shooting was done and a lot of these at least New York  locations were places familiar to me as a kid growing up in New York and some are still around, some like the el exist only in Noir now, so seeing these films is like a time machine to my past. Now a lot of these films are available if you search for them, Youtube, film libraries, archives, and under their foreign titles occasionally.

 

Before Film Noir I went on a binge of Westerns, a lot of Westerns. what I discovered with them was that out of the roughly 3,000 + about 3% are top notch about 100 then the quality drops off fast. The same % with Spaghetti Westerns, out of 600 +/- of those about 18 are are top notch.

 

It may be the same with Musicals, War Movies, Screwball Comedies, Comedies, etc., I'm not an aficionado of those like the others 3% may be a sort of benchmark.

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Noir Alley Cats

 

Just a sidebar, but I was re-watching The Asphalt Jungle last night, and in the Gus Minissi's Lunch Counter (James Whitmore) segment there is a sequence with a cat. So that got me thinking about how many cats were featured in Film Noir. The poor kitty in The Postman Always Rings Twice came to mind, and as I'm typing I just remembered the cat in This Gun for Hire. I'm sure there are a few more. Lets see how many we can remember.

Ha! Just found another Noir Alley "cat," The Crooked Way has Petey (Percy Helton) with a pet cat that gets into the action at the end.  

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That is quite unexpected to have a post replied to by a TCM host.  Thank you Eddie for your passion and for making Noir Alley such a great series.  You are certainly entitled to your opinions and I hope that my message did not come off in a hurtful or disrespectful manner.

 

If a could grovel for a moment I would like to say that your presentations for Noir Alley have added back some of the charm and style that has been missing from TCM since Robert’s passing.  Even the Wine Club promos demonstrate this and make Ben’s attempt at the same look embarrassing (sorry, Ben).  That is why I wish TCM would hire you on a permanent basis and allow you to also host movies of a more general theme, a point which I had in mind when I posted my original message.  Of course, that assumes you would be interested in and available for an expanded role, something which may not be the case.

 

But thanks again for making Noir Alley so special.  At a minimum I hope TCM will arrange for us to enjoy an extension of the series next year.

 

 

I was glad to see they kept him in the wings with those wine commercials.  Sort of an indication of more to come.  Now he is back!  I too would like to see Eddie as one of the permanent hosts.

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You even write the Wine Club spots. Very impressive.

 

Yeah, except I'm always kind of surprised that Eddie seems kind of surprised in one of those spots when told of the now vast numbers of quality vineyards located in Paso Robles CA...a location with a very similar climate as that of Tuscany and much of central Italy, and one of the world's most notable wine-making regions.

 

(...and so Eddie, if ya come back to the thread here, here's a wine suggestion for ya...if you're a fan of Zinfandel at all, there's a Paso Robles vineyard named Opolo, and their Mountain Zin is as good as it gets)

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Yeah, except I'm always kind of surprised that Eddie seems kind of surprised in one of those spots when told of the now vast numbers of quality vineyards located in Paso Robles CA...a location with a very similar climate as that of Tuscany and much of central Italy, and one of the world's most notable wine-making regions.

 

(...and so Eddie, if ya come back to the thread here, here's a wine suggestion for ya...if you're a fan of Zinfandel at all, there's a Paso Robles vineyard named Opolo, and their Mountain Zin is as good as it gets)

 

I'm going to SLO and Paso Robles for a very long weekend (20th wedding anniversary) and I'll make sure I visit Opolo since I love a nice 'fat' Zinfandel.       I have visited many wineries in the region and the quality of the wine is still below that of Napa or Sonoma and Russian River valley.     The reason is that the area has a hotter summer.     Therefore power reds like Zinfandel do well in such heat but other more delicate grapes,  not so well.       

 

PS:  My favorite CA wine area to visit now is the Alexander Valley;  great wines,  and a lot less tourist.  Calistoga is a great small town to stay in and from there,  visit all the surrounding areas.   Still quaint unlike Napa.

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Yeah, except I'm always kind of surprised that Eddie seems kind of surprised in one of those spots when told of the now vast numbers of quality vineyards located in Paso Robles CA...a location with a very similar climate as that of Tuscany and much of central Italy, and one of the world's most notable wine-making regions.

 

(...and so Eddie, if ya come back to the thread here, here's a wine suggestion for ya...if you're a fan of Zinfandel at all, there's a Paso Robles vineyard named Opolo, and their Mountain Zin is as good as it gets)

Well you can't expect a guy who likely spends a lot of time in

dark alleys, fleabag hotels, and all night picture shows to

know about sunny vineyards.

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Well you can't expect a guy who likely spends a lot of time in

dark alleys, fleabag hotels, and all night picture shows to

know about sunny vineyards.

Yes it doesn't match his zeitgeist.

 

From watching some of his spots, he looks a bit bemused, sort of a fish out of water as he tries to match a wine with say Hitchcock.   

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