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Noir Alley

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Another factor with Nocturne is its lack of the usual suspects in the supporting cast. After Lynn Bari who was in The Amazing Mr. X and Virginia Huston in Sudden FearThe Racket, and Out of the Past, I don't recognise anybody from other Noir (I'm sure there are some though) they are like the "C" team. Myrna Dell was in The Strip (1951). Mable page in Hollow Triumph (1948), Queeny Smith was in a few too, but not standouts.

You'd think you'd have the RKO "B" support.

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My favourite scene in this minor film occurred right after Raft and the blimpy thug, Torp, had started to fight but the fight was broken up by little Dorothy Adams, who bursts into the room lecturing the two guys about disturbing a baby nearby. Torp turns wide eyed and unexpectedly becomes sheepish and apologizes for upsetting a baby.

Then comes the good moment. As Raft and Torp are walking down a flight of stairs outside Raft starts questioning the big guy. They disappear off screen together with the camera remaining upon the stairs they had just descended. We then hear Torp say, "I think maybe baby not hear us now." CRASH! BANG!

The next scene has Raft getting attended by a doctor putting a king size band aid on his face.

Now that's funny (aside from the thought of a middle aged George Raft still living with his mother)!

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After several scenes I remembered I had seen Nocturne before, but didn't really remember any of it.  It was worth watching, but I thought much of it was too contrived, especially the ending.

Have never liked George Raft.  He seems one dimensional or wooden as my wife would say.  Way too much of that here.  The first role I appreciated  Lynn Bari was as a reporter in The Falcon Takes Over.

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Lynn Bari is one of those never-became-a-star performers in whom you can see considerable potential if she had received the right treatment from a studio, instead of a lot of throwaway projects tossed at her.

She was very attractive and had smart dialogue delivery. She could play a bit of a smart azz well, on occasion. It would appear that, like so many others who ventured to Hollywood to try to find their fortunes, the big breaks just didn't come her way. Bari has a nothing role in Nocturne.

p5606_i_h12_ab.jpg?d=270x360&q=20

 

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Eddie Muller mentioned that Lynn Bari was known as "The Girl With the Million Dollar Figure" (on display in the swimsuit scene) and also as "The Woo Woo Girl." The still that Tom included (above) shows how well Lynn Bari photographs. It's not just that she's attractive; look at those eyes. With the right studio and opportunities--and not being called "The Woo Woo Girl"--she surely could have been an A-List star. If you saw Lynn Bari and June Allyson, which one do would you expect to have the bigger career?

I liked Nocturne better the second time around. Though the supporting cast isn't well known, I especially enjoyed Myrna Dell as the "Tehachapi debutante" (Tehachapi is a women's prison in CA), Mabel Paige as Raft's mother, and, as Tom mentioned, Dorothy Adams as the neighbor with the baby. Bernie Hoffman as Eric Torp (great name) is like a combination of Mike Mazurki and William Bendix. Joseph Pevney as the piano player is appealing (to me, anyway) and he makes his big speech at the end believable. George Raft is one leading man I don't find attractive at all--reptilian is more like it--but he is tolerable in this film. The script has some bright lines. Raft as a policeman who keeps picking up evidence, folding it, and putting it in his pocket is one of the stranger aspects of the plot.

Muller put down Edwin L. Marin as a director, suggesting that Nocturne and the 1930s version of A Christmas Carol were his only decent films. I don't know much of his work, but Johnny Angel is good, too, even with Raft in the lead role.

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16 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Eddie Muller mentioned that Lynn Bari was known as "The Girl With the Million Dollar Figure" (on display in the swimsuit scene) and also as "The Woo Woo Girl." The still that Tom included (above) shows how well Lynn Bari photographs. It's not just that she's attractive; look at those eyes. With the right studio and opportunities--and not being called "The Woo Woo Girl"--she surely could have been an A-List star. If you saw Lynn Bari and June Allyson, which one do would you expect to have the bigger career?

I liked Nocturne better the second time around. Though the supporting cast isn't well known, I especially enjoyed Myrna Dell as the "Tehachapi debutante" (Tehachapi is a women's prison in CA), Mabel Paige as Raft's mother, and, as Tom mentioned, Dorothy Adams as the neighbor with the baby. Bernie Hoffman as Eric Torp (great name) is like a combination of Mike Mazurki and William Bendix. Joseph Pevney as the piano player is appealing (to me, anyway) and he makes his big speech at the end believable. George Raft is one leading man I don't find attractive at all--reptilian is more like it--but he is tolerable in this film. The script has some bright lines. Raft as a policeman who keeps picking up evidence, folding it, and putting it in his pocket is one of the stranger aspects of the plot.

Muller put down Edwin L. Marin as a director, suggesting that Nocturne and the 1930s version of A Christmas Carol were his only decent films. I don't know much of his work, but Johnny Angel is good, too, even with Raft in the lead role.

Another Raft film that is rather fun is Johnny Allegro, with George Macready, which turns into a variation on The Most Dangerous Game. Can't you already envision Macready with a bow and arrow?

Johnny-Allegro-2-620x400.png

"Okay, Raft, show me fear. Show me joy. Show me SOMETHING!"

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As a followup on my previous post, and for those unfamiliar with the film, I wrote a review of Johnny Allegro last year after seeing it for the first time in years.

Johnny Allegro (1949)

Of the countless tough guy melodramas that featured George Raft in the late '40s and early '50s, this slick Columbia production ranks a notch or two above most. Raft plays a gangster escaped from prison who is recruited by the Treasury Department to help them land a gang of counterfeiters.

It's not so much the plot that demands attention here as it is Columbia's effort to superficially remind its audience of one of its biggest hits of a few years before, Gilda. This is to the extent of casting George Macready as the cultured head of the counterfeiters. (You know he's cultured because he listens to classical music). He also prefers the use of a bow and arrow (a man's weapon) over that of a gun. Ballin in Gilda is now called Vallin.

His wife, whom Allegro desires, of course, is played by a sophisticated Nina Foch. Her character's name? Glenda. Not quite Gilda, but close enough. And then, of course, there are the leading men in the two films, both named Johnny.

With that bow and arrow fetish of Macready the audiences knows, too, that it probably won't be long before another variation of The Most Dangerous Game gets played out. Macready is fun to watch, even if there is a feeling of having seen much of this same act before. Raft is Raft. Did ever a block of wood dress better? And Nina Foch, well, she'll never replace the memory of Hayworth's declasse vamp.

A serviceable time waster.

Johnny-Allegro-1-620x400.jpg

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Pretty entertaining noir with most of the usual boxes checked off. I know Georgie was no great

shakes as an actor, but I usually enjoy his tough guy screen persona. I got a laugh out of how

Raft takes a raft of pictures and manages to find the women in a couple of days. How the heck

did he manage that? Yes, Lynn Bari was attractive and looked good in a swimsuit, but that

million dollar figure seems grossly inflated. I'd go with $250,000. Now if only she was called the

Yoo Hoo girl.

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5 hours ago, kingrat said:

Eddie Muller mentioned that Lynn Bari was known as "The Girl With the Million Dollar Figure" (on display in the swimsuit scene) and also as "The Woo Woo Girl." The still that Tom included (above) shows how well Lynn Bari photographs. It's not just that she's attractive; look at those eyes. With the right studio and opportunities--and not being called "The Woo Woo Girl"--she surely could have been an A-List star. If you saw Lynn Bari and June Allyson, which one do would you expect to have the bigger career?

I liked Nocturne better the second time around. Though the supporting cast isn't well known, I especially enjoyed Myrna Dell as the "Tehachapi debutante" (Tehachapi is a women's prison in CA), Mabel Paige as Raft's mother, and, as Tom mentioned, Dorothy Adams as the neighbor with the baby. Bernie Hoffman as Eric Torp (great name) is like a combination of Mike Mazurki and William Bendix. Joseph Pevney as the piano player is appealing (to me, anyway) and he makes his big speech at the end believable. George Raft is one leading man I don't find attractive at all--reptilian is more like it--but he is tolerable in this film. The script has some bright lines. Raft as a policeman who keeps picking up evidence, folding it, and putting it in his pocket is one of the stranger aspects of the plot.

Muller put down Edwin L. Marin as a director, suggesting that Nocturne and the 1930s version of A Christmas Carol were his only decent films. I don't know much of his work, but Johnny Angel is good, too, even with Raft in the lead role.

saw Mr. Muller last evening on some other network but briefly

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Cagney always said Raft was the toughest guy in Hollywood, next to him

 

Both of course being from Hell's Kitchen, NYC

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I had seen Nocturne before,i watched it again last night,because of Eddie Mueller,i think Mueller does the best job I have seen for the intros at TCM.while watching the film i noticed a scene  with Raft crossing the street to go at a movie window,from the outside  pretty sure it shows the last letters for the Pantages theatre in Hollywood,the movie playing on the marquee is Woman on the Beach ! we also see when Raft is at the window the 3 prices  for admission! 60 cents and 50 cents could not see the other one.Interesting enough Woman was supposed to be released BEFORE Nocturne, it came out in summer 1947,Renoir was forced to do major editing and reshoots by RKO  over a long period of time,Woman… is playing Noir Alley next week.

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On 9/15/2019 at 11:30 AM, cigarjoe said:

Another factor with Nocturne is its lack of the usual suspects in the supporting cast. After Lynn Bari who was in The Amazing Mr. X and Virginia Huston in Sudden FearThe Racket, and Out of the Past, I don't recognise anybody from other Noir (I'm sure there are some though) they are like the "C" team. Myrna Dell was in The Strip (1951). Mable page in Hollow Triumph (1948), Queeny Smith was in a few too, but not standouts.

You'd think you'd have the RKO "B" support.

Yeah, true.

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On 9/15/2019 at 12:56 PM, TheCid said:

After several scenes I remembered I had seen Nocturne before, but didn't really remember any of it.  It was worth watching, but I thought much of it was too contrived, especially the ending.

Have never liked George Raft.  He seems one dimensional or wooden as my wife would say.  Way too much of that here.  The first role I appreciated  Lynn Bari was as a reporter in The Falcon Takes Over.

Agree about Raft. I'd seen it before and remembered whodunit. But watched it again. Rather bored. But I enjoyed mom, who I'd forgotten was Mrs Hansen who owned the dress shop that she palmed off on Lucy! :D

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19 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Pretty entertaining noir with most of the usual boxes checked off. I know Georgie was no great

shakes as an actor, but I usually enjoy his tough guy screen persona. I got a laugh out of how

Raft takes a raft of pictures and manages to find the women in a couple of days. How the heck

did he manage that? Yes, Lynn Bari was attractive and looked good in a swimsuit, but that

million dollar figure seems grossly inflated. I'd go with $250,000. Now if only she was called the

Yoo Hoo girl.

Hey, I saw a promo for Fear Thy Neighbor this wknd. It starts next Saturday! Maybe the 3 eppys was just a preview!

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5 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Agree about Raft. I'd seen it before and remembered whodunit. But watched it again. Rather bored. But I enjoyed mom, who I'd forgotten was Mrs Hansen who owned the dress shop that she palmed off on Lucy! :D

I've seen Nocturne before, remembered who the killer was, although it didn't take much figuring about the Virginia Huston character being the woman in his house, and I was also bored with the film. Raft is wooden, but there are better films he was Ok in. I like Red Light a lot and Raft's performance is fine in that one.

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

Hey, I saw a promo for Fear Thy Neighbor this wknd. It starts next Saturday! Maybe the 3 eppys was just a preview!

Based on ID's past doings, I'll believe it when I see it, though I will tune in. One good

thing about ID is that they usually repeat the prime time shows later in the night, so if

something else is on in prime time one can still watch the ID show later in the evening.

Lynn Bari and Virginia Huston are both attractive, but I found that loud mouth maid

sexier.

 

 

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29 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Based on ID's past doings, I'll believe it when I see it, though I will tune in. One good

thing about ID is that they usually repeat the prime time shows later in the night, so if

something else is on in prime time one can still watch the ID show later in the evening.

Lynn Bari and Virginia Huston are both attractive, but I found that loud mouth maid

sexier.

 

 

LOL. Yeah, she was fun. Yeah, most nights they repeat the 3 primetime hours starting at 11pm. Buy you have to check as sometimes they don't always repeat all 3. I often will watch them later on wknds if there's something else on I want to watch.

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

LOL. Yeah, she was fun. Yeah, most nights they repeat the 3 primetime hours starting at 11pm. Buy you have to check as sometimes they don't always repeat all 3. I often will watch them later on wknds if there's something else on I want to watch.

She must have been one heck of a cleaning woman because she sure didn't survive on her

personality. Sometimes ID will switch in the late night repeats, but most of the time they

follow the prime time lineup. I watched that episode of American Monster where the nerdy

looking girl married the harmless looking guy and then he shot her in the head and claimed

it was an accident. Why not just divorce her? That happens all the time in these shows.

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I know. A quickie divorce, so to speak. Usually there's money involved (insurance or inheritance) or money they don't want to spend (divorce/child support). Some of the crimes are so stupid and pointless. Then the survivors are left to deal with it all forever...

Yeah, she probably didn't get good tips. But she seemed to have a side business going on.......

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I got hooked by the opening of Nocturne and found that it had some good moments.  However, George Raft is so dull.  The only thing I can tolerate him in is They Drive By Night.   I was a bit sad that the composer was murdered in the first scene, as he was one of the more interesting characters.   I think this could have been a great film with an actor who could really handle some of the better dialogue -- some good lines just are thrown away by Raft's delivery.  I was thinking fondly of Dick Powell, another 30s actor who ended up having a career in film noir.  

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7 hours ago, Hibi said:

I know. A quickie divorce, so to speak. Usually there's money involved (insurance or inheritance) or money they don't want to spend (divorce/shild support). Some of the crimes are so stupid and pointless. Then the survivors are left to deal with it all forever...

Yeah, she probably didn't get good tips. But she seemed to have a side business going on.......

Well at least you don't have to pay a divorce attorney. I believe she had some kind of insurance,

but still. You feel sorry for someone who died that young just because she married the wrong kind

of guy.

Yes, there are hints in some of her back and forth with Raft that she has a side gig, one where

she wouldn't have to declare her earnings. Wink, wink.

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So we got Woman On The Beach (1947) coming up Sat/Sun. Directed by Jean Renoir. How can you go wrong with noir in your name?  Seen it once. Joan Bennett, Charles Bickford, and Robert Ryan. Love triangle type of plot. From what I remember, minimal sets, sand, fog, etc., etc. Ryan doing his stock damaged individual shtick. Bickford a blind artist.  More a Drama/Mood Noir. If you like In A Lonely Place it's more in that vein. I went back and checked, and I never even wrote a review about it. 

I wasn't too enthused with it the first go round. Maybe it will be more impressive on the big screen TV with a restored print, I guess we'll see. We'll see if Eddie can inject some hook into it to make it more interesting. 

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

So we got Woman On The Beach (1947) coming up Sat/Sun. Directed by Jean Renoir. How can you go wrong with noir in your name?  Seen it once. Joan Bennett, Charles Bickford, and Robert Ryan. Love triangle type of plot. From what I remember, minimal sets, sand, fog, etc., etc. Ryan doing his stock damaged individual shtick. Bickford a blind artist.  More a Drama/Mood Noir. If you like In A Lonely Place it's more in that vein. I went back and checked, and I never even wrote a review about it. 

I wasn't too enthused with it the first go round. Maybe it will be more impressive on the big screen TV with a restored print, I guess we'll see. We'll see if Eddie can inject some hook into it to make it more interesting. 

I have only seen part of this movie, but I remember it being REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEALLY BAD!

whether it was, like, BEYOND THE FOREST BAD (ie a work of true greatness) or just a total misfire, I do not entirely recall.

I have to admit that I have very mixed feelings in re: JEAN RENOIR; I love THE SOUTHERNER but I do not like either GRAND ILLUSION or THE RULES OF THE GAME at all.

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