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Noir Alley

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6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

AHA!

Now I get it! THANK YOU.

So, in a way, *somewhat* like a BORDER COLLIE for fish?

Yea

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1 hour ago, nakano said:

it was straight from John Huston's eulogy  for Bogie,i used  the last phrase myself for a friend of mine who died too soon15 years ago.i liked the last phrase we were both young 'He is quite irreplaceable. There will never be another like him.'

Himself, he never took too seriously—his work most seriously. He regarded the somewhat gaudy figure of Bogart, the star, with an amused cynicism; Bogart, the actor, he held in deep respect…In each of the fountains at Versailles there is a pike which keeps all the carp active; otherwise they would grow overfat and die. Bogie took rare delight in performing a similar duty in the fountains of Hollywood. Yet his victims seldom bore him any malice, and when they did, not for long. His shafts were fashioned only to stick into the outer layer of complacency, and not to penetrate through to the regions of the spirit where real injuries are done…He is quite irreplaceable. There will never be another like him.

— from John Huston’s eulogy for Humphrey Bogart

Thanks, nakano. I guess I thought I was quoting Eddie Muller in those words about Humphrey Bogart, which was careless of me, because I did actually watch Eddie's comments after the airing of THTF so should have remembered that he was quoting John Huston. 

Still, the main thing is the tribute to Bogart, which Eddie clearly felt was best expressed by John Huston. It's true, "there will never be another like him".  It's too bad that many people today have barely even heard of him, let alone any of his films.

edit: although it was 15 years ago, still, I'm sorry about the loss of your friend.

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Just now, misswonderly3 said:

Thanks, nakano. I guess I thought I was quoting Eddie Muller in those words about Humphrey Bogart, which was careless of me, because I did actually watch Eddie's comments after the airing of THTF so should have remembered that he was quoting John Huston. 

Still, the main thing is the tribute to Bogart, which Eddie clearly felt was best expressed by John Huston. It's true, "there will never be another like him".  It's too bad that many people today have barely even heard of him, let alone any of his films.

Hey,  I got confused since Muller's quoting of Huston was so 'long'; As he went on I started to wonder,,,, "he is still quoting Huston?".

AND I had the book Art and Courage,  about the life of Huston,   with that speech right on the den table.  I took a quick look and,   yea,,,  Muller was still channeling John.

PS:  The book is a good read.    E.g. I didn't know how much Olivia DeHavilland and John had a 'thing', especially Olivia.    Also,  the part about Monroe and the making of The Misfits is interesting.

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I watched most of the Country Music show, though I missed the first episode.

Interesting, though the short biographies of one country star after the other got a little

boring. Jimmy Joe Clampett was born in Wompachochee, Arknasas in 1935 to a very

poor family headed by his dad, who was a mean drunk and his mother who went to

church every day. They were so poor they ate the cotton they picked for supper every

night. At age eight his mom gave him a geetar made out of an old kerosene can and

leftover kite strings. I don't remember seeing Don Williams mentioned, though I might

have missed it. I got a kick out of Roger Miller's line Our town was so small we didn't

have a town drunk, everybody took turns. 

 

When it first started out, Homicide Hunter was interesting, but after a while its appeal

wore off for me. If Kenda smoked as often as he is shown to have in the dramatic

reenactments I'm surprised he's still alive. And then there was the apparently severely

undermanned Colorado Springs homicide bureau, since he seemed to be called in every

day of the year. 

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12 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Damn sir, The variety of your knowledge and interests never ceases to amaze me. The works of Nabokov, the detailed history of ANOTHER WORLD, the history of country music- Your dinner parties must rock.

Thanks, Lorna--but I'm not smart enough to put the review of Country Music in the "I Just Watched" thread where it belongs.

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16 hours ago, kingrat said:

Thanks, Lorna--but I'm not smart enough to put the review of Country Music in the "I Just Watched" thread where it belongs.

Didn't somebody start a thread on the Country Music series?

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3 hours ago, TheCid said:

Didn't somebody start a thread on the Country Music series?

Yes, I believe somebody did.

However, because I've heard that that somebody is presently experiencing a bout of depression due to their recently having their wife leave them, their dog running away and the repossession of their pickup truck, they haven't returned to it since they started it.

(...okay SURE, I know that that's an old joke, but I'm a big believer in the practice of recycling ya know...yep, that's ME..."environmentally friendly"!)

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This weeks Noir Alley film will be Trapped (1949):

Trapped is a 1949 semidocumentary film noir directed by Richard Fleischer and starring Lloyd Bridges, Barbara Payton, and John Hoyt. It was written by George Zuckerman and Earl Felton.[1]

Like many semi-documentaries, the film begins with a voice over footage of the treasury department, telling the story of what the department does. Then it quickly begins the story once a woman tries to deposit a twenty-dollar bill at the bank that turns out to be phony.

Trapped 1949.jpg

PS:  MY true reason for posting this is because I hate country music!

 

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42 minutes ago, Dr. Somnambula said:

Dargo - Dargo - Dargo

I'm passing this link along after actually learning something.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You_Never_Even_Called_Me_by_My_Name

 

Thanks, Doc. And now I'VE learned something new today. Never heard of this song before, let alone ever having listened to it...until just now that is and after finding it on YouTube.

And now on a little more serious note...

I did in fact happen to catch that episode of Ken Burns' Country Music documentary on PBS that Kingrat particularly spotlighted earlier. The one set during the Vietnam War era.

And yeah, like him, I also found it a fascinating study of our country's cultural divide by means of the various musical tastes spread across this big ol' country of ours, and began wishing I had caught the other ones as well.

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I think I've seen Trapped before. This isnt a Noir re-run is it? If not I've seen it on TCM during a regular showing. There cant be too many counterfeit noirs out there.

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20 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

This weeks Noir Alley film will be Trapped (1949):

Trapped is a 1949 semidocumentary film noir directed by Richard Fleischer and starring Lloyd Bridges, Barbara Payton, and John Hoyt. It was written by George Zuckerman and Earl Felton.[1]

Like many semi-documentaries, the film begins with a voice over footage of the treasury department, telling the story of what the department does. Then it quickly begins the story once a woman tries to deposit a twenty-dollar bill at the bank that turns out to be phony.

Trapped 1949.jpg

PS:  MY true reason for posting this is because I hate country music!

 

This one is great until Lloyd Bridges leaves the film then it loses some steam. The copy I have is a multi generational AVI file. Hopefully this one will be a nice restored print. Don't remember if Muller said if it was or not.

Anyway if you want country music in a Noir The Crooked Way has John Payne outside a Western Swing Bar.

 

 

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Trapped is a public domain title, so it's available in a lot of terrible editions. I have it on one of those 50-movie sets from Mill Creek. 

I gave the movie a 6/10, but I don't recall much from it.

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24 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Trapped is a public domain title, so it's available in a lot of terrible editions. I have it on one of those 50-movie sets from Mill Creek. 

I gave the movie a 6/10, but I don't recall much from it.

Its got a nice denouement in a trolley barn. This was the first Noir where I really liked the Bridges character. He was playing pretty much heavies in most of the other stuff I've seen him in. In this one he's sort of likeable. 😎

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On Twitter, Eddie Muller said this about the version of Trapped that is airing:

Sorry this is so big, I tried making it smaller.

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2 hours ago, Dr. Somnambula said:

Dargo - Dargo - Dargo

I'm passing this link along after actually learning something.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You_Never_Even_Called_Me_by_My_Name

 

"I was drunk the day Mama got out of prison
And I went to pick 'er up in the rain
But before I could get to the station in my pickup truck
She got runned over by a damned ol' train"

I think I remember something about a dog and being drunk, but I heard it a long, long time ago.

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26 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

On Twitter, Eddie Muller said this about the version of Trapped that is airing:

Sorry this is so big, I tried making it smaller.

This will be great, you can barely make out the trolley barn in the copy I own.

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4 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

This weeks Noir Alley film will be Trapped (1949):

Trapped is a 1949 semidocumentary film noir directed by Richard Fleischer and starring Lloyd Bridges, Barbara Payton, and John Hoyt. It was written by George Zuckerman and Earl Felton.[1]

Like many semi-documentaries, the film begins with a voice over footage of the treasury department, telling the story of what the department does. Then it quickly begins the story once a woman tries to deposit a twenty-dollar bill at the bank that turns out to be phony.

Trapped 1949.jpg

PS:  MY true reason for posting this is because I hate country music!

 

Okay, I admit it. I jumped the gun here and just watched this movie on YouTube. I won't be around starting tomorrow afternoon as my and my wife's trip to France will begin then.

The print I watched wasn't too bad (there were two available), as the darkest scenes toward the end of the film that were shot within the old L.A. trolley storage barn were actually quite clear.

This of course means that I'll unfortunately miss hearing Eddie's insights into this film, and one I found to be quite entertaining with very good acting all around (yep, even by the ill-fated Miss Payton...pretty good NYC street accent done by this Minnesota/Texas/California girl) and nice pacing to the story. Good direction too.

(...now, after I watched it, I started reading some of the comments below the YouTube screen, and one of those comments had me laughing out loud...the comment by someone named Jeffrey Jones was: "Guess I picked the wrong week to quit counterfeiting!", a clear reference to those funny lines about quitting nasty habits said by Lloyd Bridges three decades later in the movie Airplane!...yep, I like this Jeffrey Jones guy, whoever he is...my kind'a guy!)

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33 minutes ago, Dargo said:

I won't be around starting tomorrow afternoon as my and my wife's trip to France will begin then.

Hey, enjoy your trip to France-ville. You'll be missed. Well, by some of us, anyway.

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

Okay, I admit it. I jumped the gun here and just watched this movie on YouTube. I won't be around starting tomorrow afternoon as my and my wife's trip to France will begin then.

Bon Voyage, Dargo!
 

While in France, don't pull a Lucy Ricardo and purchase an "original" painting with counterfeit money!

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On 10/3/2019 at 3:50 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

This weeks Noir Alley film will be Trapped (1949):

Trapped is a 1949 semidocumentary film noir directed by Richard Fleischer and starring Lloyd Bridges, Barbara Payton, and John Hoyt. It was written by George Zuckerman and Earl Felton.[1]

Like many semi-documentaries, the film begins with a voice over footage of the treasury department, telling the story of what the department does. Then it quickly begins the story once a woman tries to deposit a twenty-dollar bill at the bank that turns out to be phony.

Trapped 1949.jpg

PS:  MY true reason for posting this is because I hate country music!

 

I'm not a country music fan either. I'm more of a smooth jazz guy, but I guess one cannot ignore how country music has moved into the mainstream. It seems like there are awards shows every week.

Thanks for getting back to Noir Alley. I've missed the last couple of weeks. Here's hoping TRAPPED is decent.

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