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Noir Alley

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11 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

but I've often thought of starting a thread titled "Noir Comedies" or something like that. I actually maintain that a lot of noirs are funny, or at least have a lot of comedic elements to them.

There are some for sure I call them the Screwball Noirs...

A small sub genre of  Noir, Manhandled (1949)  Deadline at Dawn (1946), His Kind of Woman (1951), Shack Out On 101 (1955), and even Lady In The Lake (1946), has some of this quality, there are probably a few others lurking in the Classic Noirs. Neo Noir contenders are Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964), Seven Beauties (1977), The Late Show (1977) After Hours (1985), Down By Law (1986), Delicatessen (1991) and The Big Lebowski (1998).

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"Come back, Sidney! I wanna chastise you!"

One of my all-time favorite lines of dialogue.

I concluded a long time ago that Clifford Odets was a major sick piece of work, lol.

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This may already have been requested, but the thread is too long to read through them all...please add the Noir Alley seasons to your offerings in the TCM Shop! Eddie Muller is the best host TCM has had since our beloved and much missed Robert Osborne. I don't often shell out for DVDs/Blue Rays, but I would for the Noir Alley movies with Eddie Muller's before and after commentaries!

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

There are some for sure I call them the Screwball Noirs...

A small sub genre of  Noir, Manhandled (1949)  Deadline at Dawn (1946), His Kind of Woman (1951), Shack Out On 101 (1955), and even Lady In The Lake (1946), has some of this quality, there are probably a few others lurking in the Classic Noirs. Neo Noir contenders are Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964), Seven Beauties (1977), The Late Show (1977) After Hours (1985), Down By Law (1986), Delicatessen (1991) and The Big Lebowski (1998).

As for comedy and noir,  here are some films discussed in the book Film Noir (Ward \ Silver):  Whistling in the Dark (1941, with Red Skelton).    Parodies like Wonder Man and My Favorite Brunette (which has a cameo of Alan Ladd in a trench coat),  and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty ("the recurring motif of surreal, dream imagery and a femme fatale (played by Virginia Mayo),  are unmistakable elements of the noir canon used for satire").

Monsieur Vedoux (Chaplins' 1947 film),  and release the same year Sturges' The Sin of Harold Diddlebock with Harold Lloyd.    The following year Sturges' Unfaithfully Yours.     

Note that none of these films are even close to be consider 'noir' by the authors,  but do represent  "the pervasive impact of what may be termed the noir outlook on American culture, and the ability of film-makers to adapt elements of the noir style to other forms".

  

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5 hours ago, Ainessandil said:

This may already have been requested, but the thread is too long to read through them all...please add the Noir Alley seasons to your offerings in the TCM Shop! Eddie Muller is the best host TCM has had since our beloved and much missed Robert Osborne. I don't often shell out for DVDs/Blue Rays, but I would for the Noir Alley movies with Eddie Muller's before and after commentaries!

Perhaps they could do them as sets of 4-6 movies per set?  Sure beat the fake "Forbidden Hollywood."

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Is THE MAD MISS MANTON considered screwball noir?  Or is it too "diluted" with late Depression-era social significance? 

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309976e05ebbab9d10cfa3ab3710197a.jpg

"Why, thank you! Do you really think I look like Barbara Stanwyck? What a delightful surprise. And if you care to come back to my place, I think I can promise you an even bigger one!"

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What ?  Where are all the Noir Alley fans today? Didn't anyone watch Johnny Eager ? Come on, guys, not noirish enough or something?  (Having got that out of my system, I can hardly complain, since lately I've often been away from this thread for weeks at a time.)

Anyway, to the matter at hand (I just enjoy saying "to the matter at hand".): Johnny Eager. random thoughts and comments, and possible SPOILERS so don't read if haven't watched.

As usual, this was maybe my third go-round viewing, and as usual, I liked it a lot more than the previous times I'd seen it. I think maybe this happens partly because after the first time (or two), I'm not watching for plot, so I have time to notice other things. For instance, I get a big kick out of checking out the decor in the various settings of these films. It's fun to notice, say, the difference between how the big fancy rich gangster types have their homes decorated, and the "classy" characters. Johnny Eager's apartment (his real apartment, not the fake one where he meets the probation officer), is ritzy looking, yes. But it's full of gew-gaws and kind of "loud" accessories, like that frilly lamp next to the bar. Compare that  to Lana Turner's family residence, very "tasteful", luxurious but far fewer pictures and knick-knacks. I dunno, I think the set designers definitely thought about these kinds of details - the gangster may be rich, but he lacks the natural -born "class" or elegance of the "respectable" rich people.  Although at least he has the sense to not go for the "loud" tie his flunky tries to get him to wear.

I think the character actors in this film had a blast. Look at the one scene where Johnny meets the probation guy in his "home"...the mother and her daughter are a riot, especially the daughter, who transitions from the brassy tough teen who stays out all night dancing and skips school, to the dedicated serious school girl, studying English at the family dinner table - I love the big bow in her hair, nice touch .

Then there's "Julio", most entertainingly played by Paul Stewart. I love this guy. Remember him in Citizen Kane, as the butler (or whatever position that is) Raymond, who's supervising the tossing of all Kane's household effects into the fire? Stewart's in lots of other interesting films, including The Window and Deadline - USA. He has an interesting face, what with those vaguely sad-looking shadowed eyes, along with a kind of shoulder-shrugging insouciance that really suits the kinds of characters he plays.

Of course the two most important characters in Johnny Eager are Lana Turner's (Elizabeth) and Van Heflin's (Jeff). I know everyone's crazy about Lana, and I've nothing against her per sec, but I've never been the biggest fan either. However, she does a nice job in this film as the "classy" innocent who falls for Johnny, presumably because he's dangerous and (therefore) exciting. Actually, there's no "presumably" about it, the expression on her face when her friend reads the list of convictions against him tells it all - she's fascinated. (random trivia: Lana and Paul Stewart are in at least one other film together, The Bad and the Beautiful , although offhand I can't recall if they're in any of the same scenes...)

Van Heflin's Jeff is to me the most interesting character in the film. I mean, you can't help but wonder, what's he doing there? He's obviously not one of Johnny's thugs or flunkies, he has no part in any of that. His main role seems to be to hang around and look in equal parts poetic and drunk. No explanation is ever given as to how they ever became friends.  This guy's clearly an "intellectual" (I use the quotation marks because in 1941 I think there was a very definite idea of "intellectuals", apparently people who drank a lot and went around quoting Shakespeare and Sophocles and making extremely dry observations about everything that went on around them.) How on earth did Jeff's world and Johnny's ever collide?

I know Jeff's supposed to be the one true friend to Johnny, the only one who speaks the truth to him. That's his role in the story. But I can't help but think there's something else to all this. I am NOT one of those people who sees a gay sub-text in every other old film they see, honestly. But in the case of Johnny Eager it's hard not to think Jeff's in love with Johnny. He's so devoted to him, he takes verbal (and at one point, physical) abuse from him in a way reminiscent of female characters in love with a gangster in other movies. Then there's that bit where he tells Johnny they should run away together to the mountains and just forget their past lives. And it's not Elizabeth, it's Jeff, who SPOILER cradles Johnny in his arms at the end, tears flowing down his face as Johnny draws his last breath. And finally, it kind of explains why Jeff drinks so much; back then a closeted man would know he would never be accepted as he was, that he had a life of misery ahead of him; also back then, it's not hard to believe that some closeted gay men would be in denial about their sexuality and also live with self-loathing; this would all explain why Jeff is so unhappy and why he never stops drinking.

I dunno - - Johnny Eager isn't that deep a film, really, and I'm sorry if this post goes on too long; maybe I'm saying more about the movie than it deserves. But as I said, I enjoyed it more this time around (I think my 4th viewing) and got more out of it.

ps: cute dog. Too bad he kept getting banished to the kitchen.

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6 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

What ?  Where are all the Noir Alley fans today? Didn't anyone watch Johnny Eager ? Come on, guys, not noirish enough or something?  (Having got that out of my system, I can hardly complain, since lately I've often been away from this thread for weeks at a time.)

Anyway, to the matter at hand (I just enjoy saying "to the matter at hand".): Johnny Eager. random thoughts and comments, and possible SPOILERS so don't read if haven't watched.

As usual, this was maybe my third go-round viewing, and as usual, I liked it a lot more than the previous times I'd seen it. I think maybe this happens partly because after the first time (or two), I'm not watching for plot, so I have time to notice other things. For instance, I get a big kick out of checking out the decor in the various settings of these films. It's fun to notice, say, the difference between how the big fancy rich gangster types have their homes decorated, and the "classy" characters. Johnny Eager's apartment (his real apartment, not the fake one where he meets the probation officer), is ritzy looking, yes. But it's full of gew-gaws and kind of "loud" accessories, like that frilly lamp next to the bar. Compare that  to Lana Turner's family residence, very "tasteful", luxurious but far fewer pictures and knick-knacks. I dunno, I think the set designers definitely thought about these kinds of details - the gangster may be rich, but he lacks the natural -born "class" or elegance of the "respectable" rich people.  Although at least he has the sense to not go for the "loud" tie his flunky tries to get him to wear.

I think the character actors in this film had a blast. Look at the one scene where Johnny meets the probation guy in his "home"...the mother and her daughter are a riot, especially the daughter, who transitions from the brassy tough teen who stays out all night dancing and skips school, to the dedicated serious school girl, studying English at the family dinner table - I love the big bow in her hair, nice touch .

Then there's "Julio", most entertainingly played by Paul Stewart. I love this guy. Remember him in Citizen Kane, as the butler (or whatever position that is) Raymond, who's supervising the tossing of all Kane's household effects into the fire? Stewart's in lots of other interesting films, including The Window and Deadline - USA. He has an interesting face, what with those vaguely sad-looking shadowed eyes, along with a kind of shoulder-shrugging insouciance that really suits the kinds of characters he plays.

Of course the two most important characters in Johnny Eager are Lana Turner's (Elizabeth) and Van Heflin's (Jeff). I know everyone's crazy about Lana, and I've nothing against her per sec, but I've never been the biggest fan either. However, she does a nice job in this film as the "classy" innocent who falls for Johnny, presumably because he's dangerous and (therefore) exciting. Actually, there's no "presumably" about it, the expression on her face when her friend reads the list of convictions against him tells it all - she's fascinated. (random trivia: Lana and Paul Stewart are in at least one other film together, The Bad and the Beautiful , although offhand I can't recall if they're in any of the same scenes...)

Van Heflin's Jeff is to me the most interesting character in the film. I mean, you can't help but wonder, what's he doing there? He's obviously not one of Johnny's thugs or flunkies, he has no part in any of that. His main role seems to be to hang around and look in equal parts poetic and drunk. No explanation is ever given as to how they ever became friends.  This guy's clearly an "intellectual" (I use the quotation marks because in 1941 I think there was a very definite idea of "intellectuals", apparently people who drank a lot and went around quoting Shakespeare and Sophocles and making extremely dry observations about everything that went on around them.) How on earth did Jeff's world and Johnny's ever collide?

I know Jeff's supposed to be the one true friend to Johnny, the only one who speaks the truth to him. That's his role in the story. But I can't help but think there's something else to all this. I am NOT one of those people who sees a gay sub-text in every other old film they see, honestly. But in the case of Johnny Eager it's hard not to think Jeff's in love with Johnny. He's so devoted to him, he takes verbal ( and at one point, physical) abuse from him in a way reminiscent of female characters in love with a gangster in other movies. Then there's that bit where he tells Johnny they should run away together to the mountains and just forget their past lives. And it's not Elizabeth, it's Jeff, who SPOILER cradles Johnny in his arms at the end, tears flowing down his face as Johnny draws his last breath. And finally, it kind of explains why Jeff drinks so much; back then a closeted man would know he would never be accepted as he was, that he had a life of misery ahead of him; also back then, it's not hard to believe that some closeted gay men would be in denial about their sexuality and also live with self-loathing; this would all explain why Jeff is so unhappy and why e enver stops drinking.

I dunno - - Johnny Eager isn't that deep a film, really, and I'm sorry if this post goes on too long; maybe I'm saying more about the movie than it deserves. But as I said, I enjoyed it more this time around (I think my 4th viewing) and got more out of it.

ps: cute dog. Too bad he kept being shut into the kitchen.

Thanks for a great post, MissW. I'm happy to see Johnny Eager shown on Noir Alley or anywhere else. It's one of the best films of its year. Spoiler ahead: I also expected the film to end with Johnny dying in Elizabeth's arms. Jeff also takes verbal potshots at Johnny's various girlfriends. And I believe you're right: drinking a lot and quoting Shakespeare was exactly Hollywood's idea of an intellectual, possibly because so many of the screenwriters had read Shakespeare and drank a lot.

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I normally enjoy Van Heflin's performances, but I found off-putting the drunken blubbering and pretentious dialogue in this film. Doubtless a minority view.

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20 hours ago, Thenryb said:

I normally enjoy Van Heflin's performances, but I found off-putting the drunken blubbering and pretentious dialogue in this film. Doubtless a minority view.

No, I know what you mean. My husband really dislikes the character Van Heflin plays in Johnny Eager, and for those very reasons, he's pretty much used the same words as you...the "drunken blubbering and pretentious dialogue" is off-putting.

I too normally like Van Heflin's performances, in fact I'd say I'm a fan. I'm not sure if the pretension and and almost over-the-top drunken scenes were Van's idea, or the director's. Jeff is an interesting character, as I said in my earlier post, but I do agree he's also a bit annoying. I choose to attribute that to either the direction or the screenplay (or both), since it's the first last and only time I ever saw Van Heflin act like that, and I like him in just about everything else I've seen him in. 

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I really loved JOHNNY EAGER. Robert Taylor was great as was Lana Turner. However, I thought Van Heflin stole the show. His portrayal of a drunken intellectual constantly talking over everyone's head was spot on.  I had the same thoughts  about his character being gay. Especially, in that last scene. No offense to you Ms. W. I can see how a blubbering know-it-all drunk might be irritating to some. Maybe I don't mind it because I've been guilty of that myself  

I also enjoyed Eddie's opening and closing comments. I remembered Lana's relationship with mobster Johnny Stompanato. There was a brief scene in the neo-noir movie LA CONFIDENTIAL that highlighted them as a couple.

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3 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

.the mother and her daughter are a riot, especially the daughter, who transitions from the brassy tough teen who stays out all night dancing and skips school, to the dedicated serious school girl, studying English at the family dinner table - I love the big bow in her hair, nice touch .

She was incredibly good. Boy, I wonder how much they had to give her to perform that little charade. She was also quite a kick just being her own gritty tough-talking little self. Boy, if I had a daughter like her I would need therapy just to deal with her --- and maybe a course in martial arts just to defend myself.

I also remember being mildly smitten by Lana's little sidekick there. She is probably not a draw for that kind of attention but I am always falling for the little oddball cuties that grace (IMO) the silver screen. I have a whole list of them.

Though I am liberal enough to allow for most things, I am probably against the idea of a gay relationship there, despite some of the evidence. I think it's a buddy-buddy thing with perhaps a touch of idolatry with an added touch of servile worship. Or perhaps a mancrush of a sort. I am lukewarm toward Van Heflen as an actor. I have seen him in roles that i believe were over his head, where he tries to do what actors are supposed to be able to do but falls short. Not to open a horrific can of worms but he is totally ineffective as the so-called cad in Possession. If he is truly that bad of a guy in that film, then Van Heflen fails to deliver, IMHO. Ducking for cover, as the saying goes. Maybe I need to jump in a foxhole.

I haven't seen Johnny Eager for years and it is a rare thing indeed for me to comment at all for that reason, but I do remember really enjoying it. I'm not sure if Robert Taylor had the demeanor for real a gangster type, but he serves as the likable rogue in any case. He gets to slap Lana Turner unconscious, I wonder how he liked that. Actually he punched her. Alas, poor Lana.

//

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You mean Lana's pal, her fellow Sociology student ?  (Why do I find that idea somehow ludicrous )  the babe on the left?  (sorry the pic is so large, I couldn't find a smaller one.) Apparently she was happily married to none other than William Powell.

Image result for film johnny eager diana lewis

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4 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

You mean Lana's pal, her fellow Sociology student ?  (Why do I find that idea somehow ludicrous )  the babe on the left?  (sorry the pic is so large, I couldn't find a smaller one.) Apparently she was happily married to none other than William Powell.

Image result for film johnny eager diana lewis

MissW, you can't believe Lana as a sociology student? Next you'll be telling me you couldn't believe that Troy Donahue was going to write the great American novel in Susan Slade!

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5 hours ago, laffite said:

She was incredibly good. Boy, I wonder how much they had to give her to perform that little charade. She was also quite a kick just being her own gritty tough-talking little self. Boy, if I had a daughter like her I would need therapy just to deal with her --- and maybe a course in martial arts just to defend myself.

I also remember being mildly smitten by Lana's little sidekick there. She is probably not a draw for that kind of attention but I am always falling for the little oddball cuties that grace (IMO) the silver screen. I have a whole list of them.

Though I am liberal enough to allow for most things, I am probably against the idea of a gay relationship there, despite some of the evidence. I think it's a buddy-buddy thing with perhaps a touch of idolatry with an added touch of servile worship. Or perhaps a mancrush of a sort. I am lukewarm toward Van Heflen as an actor. I have seen him in roles that i believe were over his head, where he tries to do what actors are supposed to be able to do but falls short. Not to open a horrific can of worms but he is totally ineffective as the so-called cad in Possession. If he is truly that bad of a guy in that film, then Van Heflen fails to deliver, IMHO. Ducking for cover, as the saying goes. Maybe I need to jump in a foxhole.

I haven't seen Johnny Eager for years and it is a rare thing indeed for me to comment at all for that reason, but I do remember really enjoying it. I'm not sure if Robert Taylor had the demeanor for real a gangster type, but he serves as the likable rogue in any case. He gets to slap Lana Turner unconscious, I wonder how he liked that. Actually he punched her. Alas, poor Lana.

//

Patricia Dane, who played Johnny's "moll" Garnet, was the one who did it for me in this regard, laffite...

Annex%20-%20Taylor,%20Robert%20(Johnny%2

Secondly, I'm definitely in MissW's camp in regard to Heflin's Jeff character being gay and basically having an unrequited love/attraction for Taylor's Johnny, and with Johnny being clueless about it.

Thirdly, while also very much like MissW, I too have never been a big Lana Turner fan, I've always felt her performance in this film and along with another of her performances in 1948's The Three Musketeers in which she co-starred with Heflin, was some of her better work.

Fourthly, and in regard to Heflin's performance in this film, Heflin was always very good at playing the more "ineffectual" types onscreen such as in this film, his turn as the cuckold husband in 1949's Madam Bovary and as the rancher husband in Shane, to name just a few.

(...and fifthly, I've noticed there has been little mention of what I felt was a very good performance by Robert Taylor in this film, as very often he's mentioned by more than a few around here as being a "wooden actor"...in this case he wasn't, anyway)

 

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Secondly, I'm definitely in MissW's camp in regard to Heflin's Jeff character being gay and basically having an unrequited love/attraction for Taylor's Johnny, and with Johnny being clueless about it.

Though I don't take Jeff is gay (necessarily anyway), if he is gay I wouldn't except that Johnny was clueless. He must know but either accepting Jeff's behavior and as a straight man prudently silent on the subject, or be it tacitly understood by the viewer to be gay himself and have an occasional roll in the hay with the guy. The former is the most likely.

Annex%20-%20Taylor,%20Robert%20(Johnny%2

Beware, Miss Dane, lest this feller unleash a haymaker on that sweet chinny-chin-chin of yours. He may be measuring you right now. Just kidding. Yes, Dargo, she is a lovely, you have a good eye for the fair ones.

:)

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22 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

What ?  Where are all the Noir Alley fans today?

I'm on Oahu the last week or so, and out of the loop. Though I have some great images of whats left of "Hell's Half Acre" that I'll share with Noir Alley fan's when I get back. 😎

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11 hours ago, laffite said:

Though I don't take Jeff is gay (necessarily anyway), if he is gay I wouldn't except that Johnny was clueless. He must know but either accepting Jeff's behavior and as a straight man prudently silent on the subject, or be it tacitly understood by the viewer to be gay himself and have an occasional roll in the hay with the guy. The former is the most likely.

 

laffite, I'm still laughing at that idea...  perhaps Johnny and Jeff have "an occasional roll in the hay", it sounds so funny and incongruous.

We could debate endlessly about possibly closeted gay characters in old movies, how back then the filmmakers were not allowed to show it, and perhaps there were various codes to suggest it, all left up to the viewer. I'm pretty sure there have been threads about it here on these forums. We'll never know, and I suppose it doesn't really matter. What I said about Jeff's thing for Johnny was just my take on it, yours' is equally valid.

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Glossy gangster pic with nothing very particular about it, except for Taylor's incognito as a cabbie and Van the Man's alcoholic soliloquies. At the beginning of the movie Van says he hangs around Johnny Eager because he is playing Boswell to Eager. Eager doesn't seem to be interesting enough to have a Boswell, but maybe Van just wants to cage free drinks. I noticed that Taylor's pencil mustache has a space both above and below it. That thing must have been a pain in the neck to shave. Van was amusing for the most part, but he's no Oscar Wilde. Lana and her gal pal are Sociology students? I think it's more likely they were in the employ of Dr. Kinsey. 

I read in the book Flesh and Fantasy that Taylor became so attracted to the young Elizabeth Taylor when they were in a movie together that Bob asked the cameraman to try not to photograph him from the waist down. His johnny was too eager.

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Sorry to be late to the discussion on Johnny Eager.  I was out of town last weekend and forgot to record Noir Alley. Thankfully, it was on On Demand, and even better, it was in HD! Usually the On Demand options are in SD and I'm forced to watch the movie inside of a small box. 

Eddie's commentary, per usual, was fascinating--full of all kinds of salacious stories, which I enjoyed.

I'm usually indifferent to both Robert Taylor and Lana Turner.  I don't dislike them, but they aren't the reason why I would watch a film that either appeared in.  I was impressed by both of their performances in this film and perhaps would seek them out more.  I know Taylor was held up as some type of heartthrob back in his heyday.  I've seen another movie or two with him, and I've always thought "meh" about him--especially in that photo that Eddie showed (twice) of Taylor with wife Barbara Stanwyck.  He was not attractive at all in that photo! He had a very greasy, gummy smile appearance in that photo.  However, I thought he looked good in Johnny Eager, the mustache suits him. I could do without the widow's peak, but that's his normal hairline, so I'll let it pass. Lol.

Lana, I've always thought, was rather basic as an actress.  She wasn't terrible, but she wasn't amazing.  While I think she's very beautiful, I also find her having a rather generic type of beauty--kind of like the wives of the NFL QB's.  I have a theory that all the NFL QBs are married to the same tall, skinny, blonde woman. Anyway, I thought Lana was great in Johnny Eager, and she was excellent in another of her films--Imitation of Life.  I may need to give Lana another chance. 

I really liked Van Heflin in this film. Heflin reminds me of a cross between Arthur Kennedy and Brian Keith.  I didn't find Heflin's drunkness or intellectual ramblings off-putting, I thought he was there to somewhat serve as Taylor's moral compass.  Heflin is the one who encourages Taylor to come clean about the truth re: Julio to Lana.  Heflin tells Taylor to stop being selfish and do one thing that will help someone else.  I think that comment is what elicited the punch from Taylor.  Throughout the entire film, Taylor is doing what he needs to do to look out for himself--previous friendships and loyalties be damned.  Look what he did to Barry Nelson! When I heard Nelson speaking, for whatever reason, I thought I'd seen him in a film but as an old man. His voice seemed very distinctive.  But when I looked up his film credits, I didn't recognize any of them. So I'm not sure who I am thinking about. 

I also enjoyed the character actors.  The lady and her daughter at Taylor's decoy apartment were hilarious. I thought the daughter looked a little long in the tooth to be a teenager, but perhaps she leads a very rough life.  Poor Patricia Dane, she went off to Florida, never to be heard from again.  I was disappointed that Glenda Farrell was only in one scene, I was hoping she would have had a more integral role in the plot--but I suppose her sob story adds a little wink and a nod to the ending. I especially liked Edward Arnold as Lana's step father in this film. He always adds something to the films of his that I've seen.  I laughed though during a close-up of him. I noticed that on my TV, I could see the edges of Arnold's hairpiece. 

This was an excellent film and I look forward to tomorrow's feature--The Hitch-Hiker.  This is a fantastic film. I've seen it twice already and have yet to not find William Talman creepy. 

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One thing I was wondering about Johnny Eager:

The seemingly aloof Miss Mines, a secretary in the probation office, tips Johnny off that his parole officer is making an unexpected house call.  Was Miss Mines a plant that Johnny placed in the office to keep him informed of all goings on pertaining to him? Or are they having a romance? The way that Miss Mines informs Johnny led me to believe that this is something that happens regularly.  But then she isn't seen again. 

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20 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

This was an excellent film and I look forward to tomorrow's feature--The Hitch-Hiker.  This is a fantastic film. I've seen it twice already and have yet to not find William Talman creepy. 

Nice to see another fan of Johnny Eager.   I have liked the film for decades.  One reason might be that I "discovered" noir films mostly in chronological order;   E.g. The Maltese Falcon, The Glass Key,  and then this film,,,,.

I found Taylor to be a very charming tough-guy.   As for what he did to Barry Nelson (you sure you haven't seen Shadow of the Thin Man another MGM film?):   It was Nelson's character that was cheating Johnny and he made the first attempt on Johnny's life.  

As for Lana; Spot-on with that generic type of beauty.   I find the platinum blonde look to be "generic" but of all those that carried this look,  I feel Lana did it best (she had beautiful features that worked well with the hair).  As note,  Lana does fine as an actress here.

I also didn't find Van Helfin to be annoying but I believe that is due to the direction and editing.    I.e. just when he was pouring it on a little too thick,, CUT.

 

   

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5 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Nice to see another fan of Johnny Eager.   I have liked the film for decades.  One reason might be that I "discovered" noir films mostly in chronological order;   E.g. The Maltese Falcon, The Glass Key,  and then this film,,,,.

I found Taylor to be a very charming tough-guy.   As for what he did to Barry Nelson (you sure you haven't seen Shadow of the Thin Man another MGM film?):   It was Nelson's character that was cheating Johnny and he made the first attempt on Johnny's life.  

As for Lana; Spot-on with that generic type of beauty.   I find the platinum blonde look to be "generic" but of all those that carried this look,  I feel Lana did it best (she had beautiful features that worked well with the hair).  As note,  Lana does fine as an actress here.

I also didn't find Van Helfin to be annoying but I believe that is due to the direction and editing.    I.e. just when he was pouring it on a little too thick,, CUT.   

I have seen Shadow of a Thin Man, maybe that's where I remember him?? That's also where I recognized one of Johnny's henchmen-- he played Rainbow in that film.  For some reason, Barry Nelson seemed to have an "old man" voice that I could have sworn that I'd heard in another film--like maybe Nelson was a much younger version of a character I'd seen in a TV Show or film.  But no. So it must be the fourth Thin Man film where I recognized him from. 

I must have missed Barry's role in his own murder, I'll admit that I got lost a little bit on some of the plot points, but I will blame that on the bird trying to chew on my feet while I was watching the movie. I completely missed who Marco was, e.g. 

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20 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I have seen Shadow of a Thin Man, maybe that's where I remember him?? That's also where I recognized one of Johnny's henchmen-- he played Rainbow in that film.  For some reason, Barry Nelson seemed to have an "old man" voice that I could have sworn that I'd heard in another film--like maybe Nelson was a much younger version of a character I'd seen in a TV Show or film.  But no. So it must be the fourth Thin Man film where I recognized him from. 

Maybe you remember Nelson from The Shinning as the hotel manager who interviews Jack Nicholson for a job opening?    Nelson had the largest part in Shadow (after Nick and Nora of course) and was paired with a young Donna Reed, who like Nelson was just signed by MGM.   

Yea,  both films being MGM there were a few other bit-players in each of the films.  One remember-able one was Lou Lubin as Rainbow Benny in Shadow.  

image.jpeg.beac7d46e41cb9eeb6953c93be001b29.jpeg

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