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Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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Barry Nelson played against type as one of the few unconflicted characters in AIRPORT (1970) - not a dim-bulb gangster or cheating husband (his usual type) but the decent and capable pilot and father of seven who gently explains to Dean Martin why he should be stand-up guy and marry his pregnant girlfriend - all this while flying a cracked-open 707 through a snowstorm.

p.s. Van Heflin shows up too, as the broken man who blows open the 707.

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Johnny Eager reminds me of a comment Eddie Muller has made about Double Indemnity.  "It's a love story, alright, but it's not about a man and woman, it's about the relationship between the two men."  Robert Taylor and Van Heflin make an interesting team.  While I am not generally a Taylor fan, he does a decent job in this film.  But, Van Heflin is the standout to me  -- What a great character played by a great actor  --  funny, literate, tragic, loyal  --  no wonder he won the Oscar for this role.  

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I don't want to restart an old controversy, but Barry Nelson and his smirk should have played David Larrabee (the William Holden role), and William Holden should have played Linus Larrabee (the Humphrey Bogart role) in SABRINA (1954).

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UGH. Not for me. He would've ruined the movie for me. I could never stand Barry Nelson. Can't explain why......Glad he kept mostly on stage and not the movies.........

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Now that I think of it I don't believe that Eddie mentioned that many folks suspect that Lana

actually killed Stompanato herself and let her daughter take the blame because a jury would

be more sympathetic to the daughter. 

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4 hours ago, Brrrcold said:

I don't want to restart an old controversy, but Barry Nelson and his smirk should have played David Larrabee (the William Holden role), and William Holden should have played Linus Larrabee (the Humphrey Bogart role) in SABRINA (1954).

Nope, sorry Brrrcold, but I've said for years that the ONLY character in Sabrina who needed a change in the actor who played him was Linus. Holden was fine as David. And while Bogart is of course one of the great film actors of all time, he just wasn't quite right for the Linus role because of being just a little too old for the part by the time it was made. Bogart had lost any of his sex appeal from his earlier Casablanca days, and this making the thought that the young and beautiful Sabina would ever find him sexy and attractive enough to fall for him quite a stretch.

Nope, and ironically considering the last dozen or so posts in this thread have been about the film Johnny Eager, I've said for years the PERFECT actor to have played Linus when this film was shot would have been the actor who played the lead in that movie...Robert Taylor, and because by the early-'50s Taylor was the right age (middle aged), still had the "sex appeal" enough to star as romantic leads in films, AND his so-called "woodenness" that many people consider his acting to often be (I don't necessary, btw) would play into the character of Linus' buttoned-down staidness perfectly.

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5 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Maybe you remember Nelson from The Shinning as the hotel manager who interviews Jack Nicholson for a job opening?    Nelson had the largest part in Shadow (after Nick and Nora of course) and was paired with a young Donna Reed, who like Nelson was just signed by MGM.   

Yea,  both films being MGM there were a few other bit-players in each of the films.  One remember-able one was Lou Lubin as Rainbow Benny in Shadow.  

image.jpeg.beac7d46e41cb9eeb6953c93be001b29.jpeg

That could possibly be it? But I can't remember.  I try to block out memories of seeing The Shining if at all possible. That movie is so boring.

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Well some bonus gifs as a gift for all you Aficio-Noir-dos and Noir-istas....

I was able to visit what's left of... 

HHA01.jpg

...otherwise know as Honolulu's Chinatown and can report that there are still some fragment's of Noir alive and well for those adventurous enough to explore it after dark.

 Here is the Sin Lounge

 Oahu GIF

And The Hubba Hubba Club

Cityscape GIF

 

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11 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Nice intro and outro for The Hitch-Hiker, thanks Eddie.

I just saw this for the first time. 8/10

I liked that Muller compares it to two of my 1970s faves-Deliverance and Straw Dogs. The Hitch Hiker was a short, lean, mean exercise in suspense about two average non violent guys confronted with unimaginable evil. William Talman is one of most creepy, hateful villains I have ever seen in a film. His character not only wants to control and frighten his hostages, he seems to take a sadistic glee in humiliating and belittling them. Edmond O'Brien once again proves he is one of the more reliable character actors of his time, he is the more emotional of the two hostages. Frank Lovejoy was known mostly for playing tough, commanding lawmen in films like House Of Wax and I Was A Communist For The FBI. Here he is a victim, and is calm and thoughtful. 

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10 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Nice intro and outro for The Hitch-Hiker, thanks Eddie.

Yeah.  I almost forgot his Father was a sportswriter.:unsure:  Did he ever mention it before?  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

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The Hitch-Hiker was everything Eddie promised.  As usual, his intros and outros give new reasons to appreciate the movies on Noir Alley. I have Road House (1948) with Ida Lupino on DVD and will need to watch it again.  It is a good movie, but I don't like the way Richard Widmark played his role.  But this is about The Hitch-Hiker.

Liked that Eddie pointed out how well Frank Lovejoy performed in it.  As for William Talman, definitely not Ham Burger.

I noticed that in the opening sequences a pack of Chesterfield cigarettes fell out of the car after Talman shot the couple.  Chesterfields seem to show up a lot in movies from that period.  There was also a pack in the glove compartment of O'Brien's car.

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On ‎11‎/‎15‎/‎2019 at 6:35 PM, speedracer5 said:

That could possibly be it? But I can't remember.  I try to block out memories of seeing The Shining if at all possible. That movie is so boring.

THE SHINING is many things but boring IMO is NOT one of them. It's been a childhood classic for me since I was a child.

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10 hours ago, TheCid said:

The Hitch-Hiker was everything Eddie promised.  As usual, his intros and outros give new reasons to appreciate the movies on Noir Alley. I have Road House (1948) with Ida Lupino on DVD and will need to watch it again.  It is a good movie, but I don't like the way Richard Widmark played his role.  But this is about The Hitch-Hiker.

Liked that Eddie pointed out how well Frank Lovejoy performed in it.  As for William Talman, definitely not Ham Burger.

I noticed that in the opening sequences a pack of Chesterfield cigarettes fell out of the car after Talman shot the couple.  Chesterfields seem to show up a lot in movies from that period.  There was also a pack in the glove compartment of O'Brien's car.

I have to give the ROAD HOUSE version with Ida Lupino a look. The only ROAD HOUSE film I've ever seen was the one with Patrick Swayze.

I'm guessing the Swayze film is NOT a remake of the earlier movie.

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On 10/20/2019 at 12:30 PM, laffite said:

Didn't I read somewhere you can get TCM on Sling for an extra $5 a month, for a total of $35?

So I was scanning what I have missed in the passed several weeks and saw this, but never saw that laffite was given and answer and I didn't answer sooooo. LOL  When I originally signed up for Sling there was a $20 package, so with TCM it would have been $25.  There was also a $25 package - which I have-, with TCM $30.  Of course I don't know what their current pricing is, but I probably should.  :D (Note I did go looking from pricing and what I found says the pricing is as I stated, but that wasn't actually on Sling's site so I don't know if it is still accurate.)

THIS GUN FOR HIRE (1942) - I can't say much about this one.  The intro and the outro were the most interesting points for me.  I just wasn't in the mood to sit through it that night.

FORCE OF EVIL (1948) - Totally missed this one due to having one of the worst nights of my life.  44 year old men should not go out with 23 year old insane sexpot women.  (It wasn't a date.  She is a co-worker and it originally started as a group outing.)

SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS (1957) - What a movie.  I loved every minute of it.  I hate people like the people in this movie. LOL   But WOW is that a fantastic movie that should have won MANY awards.

JOHNNY EAGER (1941) - I did not get into this movie at all.   I watched the excellent intro.  The first twenty minutes.  Let myself fall asleep and thankfully woke back up to hear the closing remarks.

THE HITCH-HIKER (1953) - Since it seems like I watched it just a few short months ago I didn't bother to put the effort in.

So as you can see Looney is still around, but not paying too much attention.  Sorry.  I wish I had the energy and motivation to keep current, but I haven't lately.  I hope that will change soon. :unsure:

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8 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I liked that Muller compares it to two of my 1970s faves-Deliverance and Straw Dogs. The Hitch Hiker was a short, lean, mean exercise in suspense about two average non violent guys confronted with unimaginable evil. William Talman is one of most creepy, hateful villains I have ever seen in a film. His character not only wants to control and frighten his hostages, he seems to take a sadistic glee in humiliating and belittling them. 

The part where he tries to get the two friends to shoot each other William Tell style is extremely creepy.

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4 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

THE SHINING is many things but boring IMO is NOT one of them. It's been a childhood classic for me since I was a child.

Got to cut speedracer5 some slack.... favorite actress Lucille Ball favorite film The Long Trailer devotee of the mouse, etc., etc. 😊

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1 hour ago, Looney said:

44 year old men should not go out with 23 year old insane sexpot women

More details please.......

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5 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Got to cut speedracer5 some slack.... favorite actress Lucille Ball favorite film The Long Trailer devotee of the mouse, etc., etc. 😊

Thank you. I have seen the movie 3 times. Bored to tears each and every time. Having been born a few years after “The Shining” came out in theaters, it is definitely not a childhood classic of mine.

i also am not a big fan of horror films. Most of them are so dull. As far as horror goes, I like bad slasher films (because they’re funny), Vincent Price, or the James Whale films. 

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5 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

More details please.......

I am also interested in the details. i think this story would be more interesting than my opinion on “The Hitch-Hiker,” which I loved. 

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The more details are depressing.  Just know that it is not fun to be out with such a woman and watch her rub her **** on literally every person on a dance floor, but you for hours.  Well briefly you, but only briefly.  The rest of the time she tried to get rid of you.  Until she needed you again for a ride.  And again later when she needed you to possibly bail her out of jail.  That is the briefest outline of what happened.  (This is a basic outline of Looney's entire life experience.)

 

Oooo TCM Edit.  How about "booty" TCM?

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14 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

The part where he tries to get the two friends to shoot each other William Tell style is extremely creepy.

The way our friend keeps "an eye" on his captives is a bit on the creepy too. Wonderful little plot detail. He probably really practiced that. Keep still while dozing and for God's sake, no snoring.

I wasn't particularly enthused by the movie while watching but it has rallied in retrospect, not sure how that happens. I don't have TCM and caught it on the Criterion Channel. I would be interested to hear Muller's spiel on this since it has been touted already. I've been on the outside for a long time and have never seen nor heard a single intro/outro of Muller's. I haven't lived, right?

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18 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I have to give the ROAD HOUSE version with Ida Lupino a look. The only ROAD HOUSE film I've ever seen was the one with Patrick Swayze.

I'm guessing the Swayze film is NOT a remake of the earlier movie.

Totally different movies.  Road House is noir/mystery.  Jeffy (Widmark) owns Jeffy's Roadhouse and hires Lupino as a singer.  She does sing in the movie.  One of the exterior shots of Jeffy's is used in another movie, but I don't remember which one.

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8 minutes ago, Looney said:

The more details are depressing.  Just know that it is not fun to be out with such a woman and watch her rub her **** on literally every person on a dance floor, but you for hours.  Well briefly you, but only briefly.  The rest of the time she tried to get rid of you.  Until she needed you again for a ride.  And again later when she needed you to possibly bail her out of jail.  That is the briefest outline of what happened.  (This is a basic outline of Looney's entire life experience.)

 

Oooo TCM Edit.  How about "booty" TCM?

Well, if you changed your avatar, she might like you more.

:lol:

 

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6 minutes ago, laffite said:

The way our friend keeps "an eye" on his captives is a bit on the creepy too. Wonderful little plot detail. He probably really practiced that. Keep still while dozing and for God's sake, no snoring.

I wasn't particularly enthused by the movie while watching but it has rallied in retrospect, not sure how that happens. I don't have TCM and caught it on the Criterion Channel. I would be interested to hear Muller's spiel on this since it has been touted already. I've been on the outside for a long time and have never seen nor heard a single intro/outro of Muller's. I haven't lived, right?

Muller's Spiel:  The story is based on the crime spree of Billy Cook who actually committed the Hitch-Hiker killings.  Lupino interviewed him in prison for the movie as well as the two actual kidnap victims.  Cook actually had the eye deformity that Lupino added to the movie.  He was executed at San Quentin.

Muller also had lot of interesting information re: Lupino's career and so forth.  One thing he noted is that there is no credited female in the movie which was unusual for the times. 

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