Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

Recommended Posts

40 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I hear yea.    Miss W,  makes a solid point that if Eddie would show Berlin Express as part of Noir Alley,   that The Third Man,  clearly would "qualify" as well.

I guess much of my "take" on this film is due to the friend being the noir protagonist instead of Harry Lime and the fact that Harry has no redeeming qualities;  i.e. nothing that makes him a sympathetic character.            

 

Well, Alida Valli's character Anna must have thought so anyway, as even though once she learned of his vile black marketeering, she still thought Harry sympathetic enough to still love him and even help protect him, and thus at the end rejected Cotten's character Holly Martins advances due to her feeling that Martins had betrayed Lime. And in my view, what makes this movie even more an interesting take on the idea of how some people view the concept of sympathy in different shades.

(...and is perhaps the very reason the ending shot of her walking past Cotten and ignoring him on that tree-lined avenue is so memorable)

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harry Lime may have been a blaggard (when's the last time you saw that word used?) but when he is the fox with the hounds on his tail in the Vienna sewer system, all audience sympathy is with the fox. Perhaps it's just natural human empathy inasmuch as you can see Lime doggedly trying to escape despite the fact that the odds are heavily against him. The audience can, at that moment, envision itself in Lime's fleeing position. There has to be something going for his character inasmuch as,  scoundrel that he may have been, you're still rooting for him to beat the odds and get away (at least, I am).

Don't forget, Harry Lime had earlier demonstrated a charm and clever wit in his conversation with Holly, even if he lacks a conscience. You get a glimpse of his charismatic attraction in that scene, of why Anna defends (and loves) him, and of why, for a while, Holly also defended him. I see Lime as a fascinating but flawed (okay, severely flawed) human being who, somehow, changed from his earlier days as Holly's friend in America, turning in those cold bombed out streets of Vienna into something greedy, dark and deadly.

00-ThirdMan-resize-crop_1000_420_90_c1.j

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/8/2019 at 1:01 AM, Cleo noir said:

It's  too bad that you only air one film noir movie on Saturday, and repeat it on Sunday morning.  It would be great if you could expand your film noir programming.  There's another cable station that airs film noir on Thursday and Sunday nights. TCM needs to increase film noir movies, as there are many fans out there. 

What cable channel is that, Cleo Noir?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/12/2019 at 3:21 PM, filmnoirguy said:

What cable channel is that, Cleo Noir?

MOVIES channel;     They show 4 - 5 noir films every Thursday and Sunday night.      Note that MOVIES is co-owned by Fox so most of the films are from that studio.

Since TCM doesn't lease a lot of Fox films,    MOVIES is a good place to see Fox noirs,    but there are commercials and sometimes context is 'censored' (even for 40s films like The Dark Corner,  where there is a nude 16th century statue and the breasts are covered-up!!!).

But one does get to see those Dana Andrews,  Richard Widmark,  Victor Mature,  and Richard Conte,   noirs from the 40s and 50s.

  

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TomJH said:

Harry Lime may have been a blaggard (when's the last time you saw that word used?) but when he is the fox with the hounds on his tail in the Vienna sewer system, all audience sympathy is with the fox. Perhaps it's just natural human empathy inasmuch as you can see Lime doggedly trying to escape despite the fact that the odds are heavily against him. The audience can, at that moment, envision itself in Lime's fleeing position. There has to be something going for his character inasmuch as,  scoundrel that he may have been, you're still rooting for him to beat the odds and get away (at least, I am).

Don't forget, Harry Lime had earlier demonstrated a charm and clever wit in his conversation with Holly, even if he lacks a conscience. You get a glimpse of his charismatic attraction in that scene, of why Anna defends (and loves) him, and of why, for a while, Holly also defended him. I see Lime as a fascinating but flawed (okay, severely flawed) human being who, somehow, changed from his earlier days as Holly's friend in America, turning in those cold bombed out streets of Vienna into something greedy, dark and deadly.

00-ThirdMan-resize-crop_1000_420_90_c1.j

Great post here, Tom.

Yep, I defy anyone with at least an once of empathy in 'em to not feel for Lime as his fingers...well, this memorable shot in the film here...

tumblr_mzxd2uiD0g1ql2w65o9_r1_500.gif

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yep, I defy anyone with at least an once of empathy in 'em to not feel for Lime as his fingers...well, this memorable shot in the film here...

How about the parents of those kids that died by taking the bogus medicine he was pedaling?      

Ok,  those are fictional characters.         So hats off to Carol Reed's fine direction for making the audience have empathy for a man-on-the-run.   (as well as Welles' find acting,  as the charming rouge).

Of course one group that may not feel empathy towards Lime are the Swiss.       From what I understand they love their cuckoo clock!

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/12/2019 at 3:57 PM, Dargo said:

Great post here, Tom.

Yep, I defy anyone with at least an once of empathy in 'em to not feel for Lime as his fingers...well, this memorable shot in the film here...

tumblr_mzxd2uiD0g1ql2w65o9_r1_500.gif

Those dark, twisted noir streets in THE THIRD MAN could change any man. I bet even Balloon Man has his little secrets.

source.gif

Who knows what evil lurks in the . . . "Hey, heeere kitty, kitty, kitty."

81cf6edc3f5b6c888ba6de6f4d3acc04.gif

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Criss Cross tonight!

"Eddie Muller puts it #2 on his Top 25, right behind In A Lonely Place. And he offers this in justification: "De Carlo in the parking lot pleading straight to the camera might be noir's defining moment.""

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/12/2019 at 3:37 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

MOVIES channel;     They show 4 - 5 noir films every Thursday and Sunday night.      Note that MOVIES is co-owned by Fox so most of the films are from that studio.

Since TCM doesn't lease a lot of Fox films,    MOVIES is a good place to see Fox noirs,    but there are commercials and sometimes context is 'censored' (even for 40s films like The Dark Corner,  where there is a nude 16th century statue and the breasts are covered-up!!!).

But one does get to see those Dana Andrews,  Richard Widmark,  Victor Mature,  and Richard Conte,   noirs from the 40s and 50s.

  

I'm a fan of MOVIES; being of a certain age the commercial interruptions  do not strike me as strange. And I like the bare-bones programming style, though I think intro/outro commentary would help me appreciate several films I've watched there.

But a nagging question to me is this: why do they keep scheduling DAISY KENYON (1947) in the Noir blocks? It's got Joan Crawford and Dana Andrews, and it's directed by Otto Preminger. But it's not noir.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Criss Cross tonight!

"Eddie Muller puts it #2 on his Top 25, right behind In A Lonely Place. And he offers this in justification: "De Carlo in the parking lot pleading straight to the camera might be noir's defining moment.""

My first exposure to Yvonne DeCarlo, like many others, was seeing her play Lilly Munster on television (in black & white).  Then I saw her in living color as Moses' wife, Sephora in "The 10 Commandments".  I think she had the most beautiful eyes for an actress; smoky, penetrating, and sensual are adjectives that come to mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One again whats wrong with THE THIRD MAN???

 

Night and the City (l950) ^ ithers were done overseas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Brrrcold said:

I'm a fan of MOVIES; being of a certain age the commercial interruptions  do not strike me as strange. And I like the bare-bones programming style, though I think intro/outro commentary would help me appreciate several films I've watched there.

But a nagging question to me is this: why do they keep scheduling DAISY KENYON (1947) in the Noir blocks? It's got Joan Crawford and Dana Andrews, and it's directed by Otto Preminger. But it's not noir.

But it is shot like one- lots of shadows and lines.

Which actually brings to mention that the entry this week CRISS CROSS (1948?) is worth literally looking at. I apologize if this sounds a little goofy, but many scenes almost remind me of a black-and-white comic book with their framing and continuity.

steranko.GIF

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Brrrcold said:

I'm a fan of MOVIES; being of a certain age the commercial interruptions  do not strike me as strange. And I like the bare-bones programming style, though I think intro/outro commentary would help me appreciate several films I've watched there.

But a nagging question to me is this: why do they keep scheduling DAISY KENYON (1947) in the Noir blocks? It's got Joan Crawford and Dana Andrews, and it's directed by Otto Preminger. But it's not noir.

As for you're last question,    I believe you answered it:      Some young-kid programmers sees Crawford,  Andrews and Preminiger,,,,   must be noir!

I also watch MOVIES despite the commercials since they show Fox films TCM doesn't.     Often an NBA game is on and I can watch both (which drives the wife nuts).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Criss Cross tonight!

"Eddie Muller puts it #2 on his Top 25, right behind In A Lonely Place. And he offers this in justification: "De Carlo in the parking lot pleading straight to the camera might be noir's defining moment.""

Criss Cross is a first rate noir;    Also a Los Angeles noir that highlights some areas of L.A.  I recall as a child when my dad worked there during the 60s.

Seeing Lancaster and Duryea going at it over a stunning and vulnerable De Carlo,,,       can't be missed!

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Criss Cross is a first rate noir;    Also a Los Angeles noir that highlights some areas of L.A.  I recall as a child when my dad worked there during the 60s.

Seeing Lancaster and Duryea going at it over a stunning and vulnerable De Carlo,,,       can't be missed!

 

AND, the very first appearance by young Bernie Schwartz in a movie too!

(...otherwise known as...well, I'm sure you know) ;)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Criss Cross made a huge impression upon me when I first saw it on TV as a kid. I had never heard the term "noir" at the time. I only knew that I liked the film and could feel for Lancaster's character. As the years rolled by I forgot most of the film except for the its final image - that was seared into my brain, and remains, I feel, as definitive an ending of the genre as any noir film ever had.

Burt Lancaster was largely in his '40s films a beefcake actor to me. There always seemed to be a moment in which he would show off his impressive physique in an under shirt (as there is in Criss Cross) but it wouldn't be until a few years later that he really started to shine as a dramatic actor.

A HUGE SPOILER ALERT ON ALL THAT FOLLOWS:

However, in watching Criss Cross again, I have to say that Burt is far more than just a hunk. He really is quite wonderful in a role that can be seen as largely a reprise of his character from The Killers. Lancaster is alternately tough and macho but also sensitive and emotionally vulnerable in many of his scenes with de Carlo. Certainly that vulnerability was on full display in the film's  final scene in which he is shocked and hurt to see the girl who is his obsession suddenly running out on him when the chips are down but quickly becomes resigned to his fate (much as he had in The Killers) because, with her gone from his life, he just doesn't care what happens any more.

The other comment I want to make about that memorable final scene is Dan Duryea's performance in it. He is about to hand out street code "justice" but he speaks softly and, with his words ("You really loved her, didn't you, Steve? I did too. Hold her tight") is strangely sympathetic towards the man he is about to kill. It adds an irony to the scene, with a killer emotionally connecting, at least to a degree, with a man who is about to become his victim. In fact, Duryea says nothing at all to de Carlo, almost as if she isn't even there. It's Burt only that he addresses in those final seconds of the lovers' lives. Duryea plays the scene low key,  like a man emotionally resigned to what is about to happen and the sheer fatalistic inevitability of it all.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, CRISS CROSS was very entertaining. It was my first time seeing the film. Though it didn't make my top five favorites, all my favorite elements except the hard boiled detective were there.

Which brings me to another question. I'm sure this has been done many times before (maybe even by me; I forget), but I'd like to know everyone's top five noirs. Mine are THE MALTESE FALCON. DOUBLE INDEMNITY, LAURA, DARK PASSAGE and OUT OF THE PAST. 

Also, I mentioned to my wife while we were watching that DeCarlo's dance partner looked a lot like Tony Curtiss.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course it was Tony Curtis as her dance partner.

Naming 5 favorite noirs is impossible. Just off the top of my head  these are some favs  but I could list many more. 

Out of the Past

Laura

Double Indemnity

The Killers

Nightmare Alley

Dark Passage

The Killing

On Dangerous Ground

Sudden Fear

The Asphalt Jungle

Tension

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Criss Cross is so intensely bleak!  I've seen it before, but not for a long, long time.  Great, as always to get Eddie's insights.  I also really like that he'll feature clips from a film to highlight what he's talking about.  That isn't done that often on TCM.  It's a visual medium so just yakking about a scene isn't always helpful.  Thanks for that Eddie (and I assume) your producer/s.

I agree with a previous poster who noted Lancaster's range.  Early for him, before he became BURT LANCASTER, and was still listening to his director and playing off his co-stars with more subtlety than he'd display later in his career.

The final scene is a miracle of noir, from DeCarlo's monologue, to Lancaster's utter defeat and resignation, to the "Pietå" framing.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lancaster had been in  7 noir\crime films prior to Criss Cross so in this regard he had experience.    

Lancaster wouldn't do another noir \ crime film until 8 years later with Sweet Smell of Success (with Tony Curtis doing more than just a dance).

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

Yes, CRISS CROSS was very entertaining. It was my first time seeing the film. Though it didn't make my top five favorites, all my favorite elements except the hard boiled detective were there.

Which brings me to another question. I'm sure this has been done many times before (maybe even by me; I forget), but I'd like to know everyone's top five noirs. Mine are THE MALTESE FALCON. DOUBLE INDEMNITY, LAURA, DARK PASSAGE and OUT OF THE PAST. 

Also, I mentioned to my wife while we were watching that DeCarlo's dance partner looked a lot like Tony Curtis.

Either you didn't read my earlier post up there Hogan, or else you didn't know that Tony's real name was Bernard or "Bernie" Schwartz.

And re this film...

This is probably my third or fourth time watching it, and yeah, it seems to get better each time. And yeah again, like Tom mentioned up there, this time one of the things I noticed was how good Lancaster was in his role.

And once again, Eddie didn't disappoint in this wraparounds, and especially liked how he brought up some of L.A.'s old and no longer existing haunts such as Bunker Hill and the original Angel's Flight, and of course some old haunts that do still exist such a Union Station and L.A. City Hall, and which director Siodmak used to great effect. Being an old native Angeleno myself, I always love seeing these sorts of things of which I have vague childhood memories of when as a kid my family would go to Downtown to see a first-run film at one of the great old movie palaces there.

(...btw, now days there are no more "little cottages" up in the now extremely toney area of Palos Verdes, and where this film closes)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Either you didn't read my earlier post up there Hogan, or else you didn't know that Tony's real name was Bernard or "Bernie" Schwartz.

And re this film...

This is probably my third of fourrh time watching it, and yeah, it seems to get better each time. And yeah again, like Tom mentioned up there, this time one of the things I noticed was how good Lancaster was in his role.

(...and once again, Eddie didn't disappoint in this wraparounds)

SPOILER ALERT:

It's a small thing, perhaps, but it's rather touching. In that final scene in Criss Cross, as de Carlo screams and cringes in Lancaster's arms and death for both of them is just seconds away, Burt's last gesture is to try to confort her, the woman who was about to run out on him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, TomJH said:

SPOILER ALERT:

It's a small thing, perhaps, but it's rather touching. In that final scene in Criss Cross, as de Carlo screams and cringes in Lancaster's arms and death for both of them is just seconds away, Burt's last gesture is to try to conform her, the woman who was about to run out on him.

Well, as I'm sure you know Tom, there was no "conforming" Yvonne's character in this thing, because as you may remember, one of the lines she says to Lancaster is something about not wanting a life where she has her hair cut short and works some boring 9-to-5 job. 

(...yeah yeah, I knew you really meant to say "comfort" her up there) ;) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Well, as I'm sure you know Tom, there was no "conforming" Yvonne's character in this thing, because as you may remember, one of lines she says to Lancaster is something about not wanting a life where she has her hair cut short and works some boring 9-to-5 job. 

(...yeah yeah, I knew you really meant to say "comfort" her up there) ;) 

Oops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Dargo said:

Either you didn't read my earlier post up there Hogan, or else you didn't know that Tony's real name was Bernard or "Bernie" Schwartz.

 

Yes, I read your post and realized you were referring to Tony Curtiss. I was just saying I thought I recognized him while viewing the movie before Eddie confirmed it.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...