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5 hours ago, Cigarjoe cellph said:

Bracketing Christmas we have Cash On Demand and Repeat Performance. I haven't seen the first that I can remember. The latter is a sort of Twilight Zone Noir

I thought your screen name was "Cigarjoe Caliph".

Cash On Demand is a solid if minor British crime drama, with good performances from Peter Cushing and Andre Morell. The scope of the action is rather limited, and it comes across more TV-like than cinematic.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

I thought your screen name was "Cigarjoe Caliph".

Cash On Demand is a solid if minor British crime drama, with good performances from Peter Cushing and Andre Morell. The scope of the action is rather limited, and it comes across more TV-like than cinematic.

Looks like Cigar Joe has created a new user for his post that come from the smart-phone.

I assume this since he did mention that he was using a smart-phone when this website was updated to make it more smart-phone "friendly".

 

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11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I thought your screen name was "Cigarjoe Caliph".

No I just finally connected to TCM with my cell phone finally but couldn't remember the TCM  password so just used another email to create a new account. 😎

I'll just use Cell Phone CJ when I'm away from the laptop. But yes the boards are definitely more user friendly on a smart phone, no scrolling involved.

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Cash On Demand is a solid if minor British crime drama, with good performances from Peter Cushing and Andre Morell. The scope of the action is rather limited, and it comes across more TV-like than cinematic.

Yes you know now that I think about it I think  I have seen Cash On Demand.  If its the film where it almost all takes place in the bank's office  (it's pretty BLAH visually) then I've seen it.

It does seem a strange choice for a British Noir for Noir Alley when there are far better British Noirs that could be showcased.

Now hopefully Repeat Performance is a restored print. I do own an AVI copy of it and will be jacked to see a good print.  

On a side note growing up as a kid my first contact with Film Noir was in two areas. The first was Classic Noir  films such as Murder My Sweet, The Maltese FalconThe Big Sleep, Double Indemnity, and even Lost Weekend, the other films that. to me, fit that same dark category were the Noir-styled  Dramas of Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire, and The Fugitive Kind are two that come to mind.  The second contact was on 50s TV with the Noir-ish episodes of  Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and The Twilight Zone which blended Noir with Fantasy, Supernatural, and SyFy.  The Classic Noirs  that were supernatural and fantasy based Alias Nick Beal (1949),  The Amazing Mr. X (1948), Fear in the Night (1947), The Night Has a Thousand Eyes (1948), Nightmare (1956), covered roughly the same territory as Repeat Performance (1947), there are probably a few more. You can possibly even include It's a Wonderful Life (1946) for the Noir-ish sequence and Val Lewton's The Seventh Victim (1943).

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On 12/16/2019 at 8:10 PM, lavenderblue19 said:

Thanks glad you also like those films.  There's another 2 that I'm not quite sure if considered noirs but I think they could be  -

Five Miles To Midnight. Sophia Loren and Anthony Perkins and Chase A Crooked  Shadow - Anne Baxter and Richard Todd

I remembered your quote again when I thought about a recent film I saw that was filmed stylistically Noir but just tipped a bit way too far over into Horror/Slasher film, which is what it;s marketed as.  There is no denying it's heavy  Noir style roots, but rather that balance on the cusp of Noir it just went ridiculously over the edge. It a 2012 remake of Maniac (1980) starring Elijah Wood doing a great job of annihilating his cute-sie  Frodo Hobbit persona.  For someone with a more inclusive idea of Noir it could make their list.

I've never seen the first, but I'm sure LawrenceA can fill us in on what the original was like.  I'd give it 6/10.

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On 12/12/2019 at 8:05 AM, Hoganman1 said:

You're right. One film that would qualify is BODY HEAT. It has all the characteristics of noir.  Also,  LA CONFIDENTIAL and BLACK DAHLIA are tributes to the film noir era. SEA OF LOVE and BASIC INSTINCT are considered neo-noir by many.  Everyone has their own definition of "film noir". While I generally consider the genre to be limited to B&W films from the 40s and 50s, I certainly respect the opinions of those who have a much broader view.  

My favorite neo-noir is Chinatown.  Followed by Body Heat and LA Confidential.  And I agree with your definition of film noir.  When the French critics came up with that phrase they were referring to black & white crime dramas/detective stories of the 1940s & 50s.

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

It a 2012 remake of Maniac (1980) starring Elijah Wood doing a great job of annihilating his cute-sie  Frodo Hobbit persona.  For someone with a more inclusive idea of Noir it could make their list.

I've never seen the first, but I'm sure LawrenceA can fill us in on what the original was like.  I'd give it 6/10.

Maniac (1980) is a very sleazy, graphic, uncomfortable psycho-killer flick. It's a showcase for sweaty character actor Joe Spinell, who appeared in a lot of major films (The Godfather Part IITaxi Driver) in small roles, and larger roles in more dubious fare (Starcrash). The story was inspired by the Son of Sam killings, with Spinell as the ranting, depraved killer. The film was notorious for its (at the time) very graphic killings, featuring the work of make up FX legend Tom Savini. The movie's appeal will be limited, but if one enjoys that particular brand of late-70's/early-80's NYC grime and sleaze, it's a must-see. Director William Lustig made several other genre films (VigilanteManiac Cop) before starting the Blue Underground home video company, who are the prime source for Italian genre films on disc (horror, giallo, spaghetti westerns, crime thrillers, etc.).

spinelli300.jpg

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1 hour ago, filmnoirguy said:

When the French critics came up with that phrase they were referring to black & white crime dramas/detective stories of the 1940s & 50s.

What they actually said was that the American Films reminded them of the French poetic realist films of 1930's that critics called "Film Noir" because they dealt with dark subject matter. 

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Maniac (1980) is a very sleazy, graphic, uncomfortable psycho-killer flick. It's a showcase for sweaty character actor Joe Spinell, who appeared in a lot of major films (The Godfather Part IITaxi Driver) in small roles, and larger roles in more dubious fare (Starcrash). The story was inspired by the Son of Sam killings, with Spinell as the ranting, depraved killer. The film was notorious for its (at the time) very graphic killings, featuring the work of make up FX legend Tom Savini. The movie's appeal will be limited, but if one enjoys that particular brand of late-70's/early-80's NYC grime and sleaze, it's a must-see. Director William Lustig made several other genre films (VigilanteManiac Cop) before starting the Blue Underground home video company, who are the prime source for Italian genre films on disc (horror, giallo, spaghetti westerns, crime thrillers, etc.).

spinelli300.jpg

So would you say this is one of his defining parts?

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I just watched "Cash on Demand". I thought it was delightful. Perhaps not quite noir but worthwhile for the acting of Peter Cushing and André Morell. It is more like a play made into a movie, in my opinion. I love British movies of that era so it's hard for me to dislike this one. P.S. Merry Christmas to all Noir Fans!

Edited by ClassiqueFan
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I agree with Classique Fan. Though not really a noir CASH ON DEMAND was delightful and entertaining. As a fan of Hammer productions, anything with Peter Cushing draws my attention.  Andre Morelli was great too. I remember him from HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES. ALL in all I'm glad Eddie chose this film as his Christmas gift to all of us that love Noir Alley.

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15 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Anybody watch Cash On Demand last night?

Only the first 1/2 hour of it CJ, and then recorded the rest of it and so I could catch Eddie Murphy hosting SNL last night, and which turned out to be one of the better and funier SNL broadcasts in recent memory.

(...and I probably will not end up watching the rest of COD later,  because at least from that first 1/2 hour of it, it looked pretty stagebound, slow moving and a little too filled with that standard old British reserve)

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On 12/19/2019 at 6:31 PM, LawrenceA said:

Cash On Demand is a solid if minor British crime drama, with good performances from Peter Cushing and Andre Morell. The scope of the action is rather limited, and it comes across more TV-like than cinematic.

 

On 12/20/2019 at 7:39 AM, cigarjoe said:

Yes you know now that I think about it I think  I have seen Cash On Demand.  If its the film where it almost all takes place in the bank's office  (it's pretty BLAH visually) then I've seen it.

It does seem a strange choice for a British Noir for Noir Alley when there are far better British Noirs that could be showcased.

 

 

6 hours ago, Dargo said:

(...and I probably will not end up watching the rest of COD later,  because at least from that first 1/2 hour of it, it looked pretty stagebound, slow moving and a little too filled with that standard old British reserve)

No,  all three of you are really underestimating this film. I thought Cash on Demand was great: beautifully acted,  entertaining ( as in never a dull moment entertaining), suspenseful,  clever, and in an odd way, quite moving.

And I say this as someone who doesn't usually like films that are set all in one  place, especially one room, films that look like they're based on a play. But in the case of Cash on Demand, the one setting idea really works.  Lawrence observes that "the scope of the action is limited" ; and while this is true, it does not take away anything from the tension of the story. In fact, limiting the "scope" like that makes the film tighter, more suspenseful. It's true that a film has to be very good in terms of acting and dialogue to get away with one set throughout, but I think Cash on Demand has those qualities.

And what's wrong with "standard British reserve"? I  love British films, and it's often because of that reserve that I do.  

Sorry to say, and no offense intended towards any of the three of you, but I think you guys somehow missed the point of this movie.  To me it was a fascinating study in character. As Eddie pointed out, in some ways the "villain" was more sympathetic than the "good guy" - and there were a few surprises along the way, especially in the last ten minutes. I think anyone who thought Cash on Demand was dull was not paying sufficient attention to what was going on in it. There may not have been much "action " per sec, but there was plenty going on.

Sometimes I think most of the posters here don't have an appreciation for any films that aren't American. Certainly British films are made with a different sensibility, but I think that's a good thing.

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9 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Sometimes I think most of the posters here don't have an appreciation for any films that aren't American. Certainly British films are made with a different sensibility, but I think that's a good thing.

Not true, you jump to easily to conclusions British film Noir that are top notch and visually satisfying.

They Made Me A Fugitive (1947) 

Poster%2BIBAC.jpg

 I would almost call this the best UK Best Noir, but I'd have to watch Night and the City again, and then of course there are probably many others that are off our noirdar screens here in the U.S. Films never watched. Anyway this has two titles not to be confused with the Garfield flick of the same name.

Brighton Rock (1948)

Image result for Brighton Rock (1948) Poster

For Them That Trespass (1949)

_For_Them_That_Trespass%2Bposter.jpg

Night And The City (1950)

Image result for Night And The City poster

The Blue Lamp (1950) 

Poster.jpg

The Long Memory (1953)

Image result for The Long Memory (1953) Poster

Pool Of London (1951)

POL%2BPoster.jpg

Never Let Go (1960)

Never%2BLet%2BGo%2Bposter.jpg

I'm  visually oriented  it's the same reason I don't rate In A Lonely Place all that high its visually Blah to me also.

 

 

 

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Maybe a Spoiler- so here's an Alert

MissW, I also liked Cash On Demand very much. Thought the acting was great, the story held my attention. I also agree, an interesting character study. Cushing as a Scrooge like character who does a turn around in the end, and  Andre Morell as the criminal who turns  out to be likeable and turns Cushing's  character around. The film may not have been visually thrilling but it worked. I had no problem with the film only having scenes in the bank and a couple outside the bank. the character study was what was important.  I enjoyed the film very much, thought the dialogue was witty, the film suspenseful and glad I watched it this morning.

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3 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I thought Cash on Demand was great: beautifully acted,  entertaining ( as in never a dull moment entertaining), suspenseful,  clever, and in an odd way, quite moving.

I wholeheartedly agree.  I enjoyed it thoroughly. Stellar performances and well worth my time!

Kudos to Eddie. It sounded as if he had this one on his list for some time now. This is exactly the kind of film I'm grateful to TCM for finding and showing.

I hope the powers that be continue to follow Eddie's requests in bringing these obscure crime films to the channel.

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Well, it sounds as if I should finish watching this film.

Remember here, I earlier said I only watched the first half hour of it, but commented that its "staginess" and rather slow buildup made it seem at the time that I'd have a difficult time getting into it.

And no MissW, like CJ said above here, in my case too, there ARE many British films over the years which I have found I like very much, and yes, often with them containing that "standard British reserve" that I mentioned earlier. I could list 'em for ya, but it would take hours and hours to compile such a list. However, a film containing a LOT of "standard British reserve" which first comes to mind and which I absolutely love would be Brief Encounter.

(...yep, there are MANY films that have been made by those superfluous-u users over there that I've watched and have found to be exceptional cinema) ;)

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9 hours ago, Dargo said:

a little too filled with that standard old British reserve

I, for one, am jolly well fond of that old British reserve myself, and old man (i.e., my dear fellow and all that rot) you must admit that the perpetrator of the crime in question let on early that he much detested "brutality" and preferred instead the "smoothness" and "sociability" in the commission of a crime and though he didn't go so far as to say that good old English reserve would serve so much better for that than old Hollywood vulgarity in the rendering, I'm sure he would agree with it. I am also jolly well fond of talkiness and staginess and that it is all the better with those stuffy English accents, all of which goes to show that I am much more the "square" than all of you "hepcats" out there. So much depends on one's humours.

It crossed my mind somewhere fairly early on that old Pearson there was going to pull another faux pas that would in effect blow the whole scheme and save the day and that poor Fordyce would have to eat all those nasty words about the dignity of the banking profession and his gestapo tactics in ensuring good form and actually be forced to actually say something nice to Pearson. But he had say something nice anyway in the end and even shook his hand.

//

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28 minutes ago, laffite said:

I, for one, am jolly well fond of that old British reserve myself, and old man (i.e., my dear fellow and all that rot) you must admit that the perpetrator of the crime in question let on early that he much detested "brutality" and preferred instead the "smoothness" and "sociability" in the commission of a crime and though he didn't go so far as to say that good old English reserve would serve so much better for that than old Hollywood vulgarity in the rendering, I'm sure he would agree with it. I am also jolly well fond of talkiness and staginess and that it is all the better with those stuffy English accents, all of which goes to show that I am much more the "square" than all of you "hepcats" out there. So much depends on one's humours.

It crossed my mind somewhere fairly early on that old Pearson there was going to pull another faux pas that would in effect blow the whole scheme and save the day and that poor Fordyce would have to eat all those nasty words about the dignity of the banking profession and his gestapo tactics in ensuring good form and actually be forced to actually say something nice to Pearson. But he had say something nice anyway in the end and even shook his hand.

//

LOL

Terry-Thomas.jpg

"I say ol' boy! Did I just detect a fellow Cambridge man, here?!"

;)

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I'll repeat I'm visually oriented, I watched Cash On Demand the last time it was on TCM  didn't remember that I did,  and when Lawrence described the plot I realized that I did see it and didn't feel the need to see it again.

Two other films BTW in the same vein as Cash On Demand  for me are Detective Story with Kirk Douglas and Hitchcock's Rope.  But hey if Cash On Demand floats your Noir boat there's nothing wrong with that. 😉

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I'll repeat I'm visually oriented, I watched Cash On Demand the last time it was on TCM  didn't remember that I did,  and when Lawrence described the plot I realized that I did see it and didn't feel the need to see it again.

Two other films BTW in the same vein as Cash On Demand  for me are Detective Story with Kirk Douglas and Hitchcock's Rope.  But hey if Cash On Demand floats your Noir boat there's nothing wrong with that. 😉

I had the same thought about ROPE. I don't think I've seen DETECTIVE STORY so I'll add that to my list. COD also reminded me of SLEUTH in that it all takes place in one location and still manages to maintain the suspense we've all come to enjoy.  

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1 hour ago, Hoganman1 said:

I had the same thought about ROPE. I don't think I've seen DETECTIVE STORY so I'll add that to my list. COD also reminded me of SLEUTH in that it all takes place in one location and still manages to maintain the suspense we've all come to enjoy.  

Deathtrap is another. A film that also takes place indoors and in basically one location. It's an excellent,  suspenseful film, with witty dialogue, and although the plots and characters are totally different and have nothing to do with each other, for me,  it's similiar in a sense to Cash On Demand in  that it's also a character driven film.  

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