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Just now, kingrat said:

Counsellor at Law is yet another film with basically one location, brilliantly directed by William Wyler, who also directed Detective Story. Sorry I missed Cash on Demand.

The Petrified Forest would be another "basically" one location film.    (the movie does add some very short outside scenes and their is the rooftop scene (my favorite of the film), but otherwise one location.

As for Cash on Demand;   I also missed it.    Hopefully TCM shows it again.

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I watched Cash on Demand and would give it a 3 out of 5.  Worth watching all of it, but not terribly interesting.  I never saw any real connection to A Christmas Carol.    I recorded it, but won't keep it as will never watch it again.

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TheCid said: " I never saw any real connection to A Christmas Carol. "  Really?  I saw it right away.  And without first looking up any information about the movie. Funny how movies affect people so differently. I was going to rate CASH ON DEMAND but refrained from doing so in my first post. Now, I'm ready to give it a 4 out 5.

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Well done and entertaining flick in the patented British subdued approach. There's nothing funnier than seeing

the tables turned on a hidebound control freak who now  finds himself under the thumb of someone else who is now

in charge of him just as he is in charge of his cringing subordinates. That has to hurt him tremendously. Granted,

Morell is a more charming and personable chap than Cushing, though that's a bit of a low bar. Still, if push came

to shove I wouldn't trust Morell at all. I think the Scrooge comparison is a bit of a stretch. While at the end of the

film Cushing manages a tiny smile and will come to the Christmas party, I wouldn't be surprised if he showed up

after the holidays are over as the same authoritarian pain in the neck as he was before. Redemption highly in

doubt. At least he got those volumes of Gibbon for all his troubles. 

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I assume that the showing of Repeat Performance (1947),  is for Noir Alley and thus Eddie will host.    Another British Noir (Eagle=Lion) film I haven't seen that sounds interesting.    Louis Hayward, Joan Leslie (1st film after her Warner Bros contract wasn't renewed) and Tom Conway.  

image.jpeg.7a9b330ce5e18b0748858b1b32f0539a.jpegimage.jpeg.62c44d26f3c4bc9fbcabe48b73deeed1.jpeg

 

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18 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I assume that the showing of Repeat Performance (1947),  is for Noir Alley and thus Eddie will host.    Another British Noir (Eagle=Lion) film I haven't seen that sounds interesting.    Louis Hayward, Joan Leslie (1st film after her Warner Bros contract wasn't renewed) and Tom Conway.  

image.jpeg.7a9b330ce5e18b0748858b1b32f0539a.jpegimage.jpeg.62c44d26f3c4bc9fbcabe48b73deeed1.jpeg

 

While I found it does say on the IMDb website and in Wiki that this film was distributed by the British Eagle-Lion concern James, it's not a British film, as it was filmed at the Universal Pictures lot, stars many an American actor and a few ex-pat British actors, and I believe is also set in the U.S.

(...and so I would say calling it a "British Noir" would be off the mark in this case)

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12 minutes ago, Dargo said:

While I found it does say on the IMDb website and in Wiki that this film was distributed by the British Eagle-Lion concern James, it's not a British film, as it was filmed at the Universal Pictures lot, stars many an American actor and a few ex-pat British actors, and I believe is also set in the U.S.

(...and so I would say calling it a "British Noir" would be off the mark in this case)

Thanks for the update.     The film does star two British actors,,,  oh,  wait,,,,    Hayward was born in South Africa,  and Conway in Russia  (Tom's parents  moved to Britain when he was 11).        And all along I though Eddie had some type of theme going on!    (after I missed seeing Cash on Demand). 

 

 

      

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Repeat Performance is the only noir that comes to mind with a fantasy element (shades of It's a Wonderful Life) to the story line. Its opening scene, set in a high rise apartment on a windy night, has all the classic visual elements of the genre. It's been a while since I last saw it but it's a film worth viewing.  Sadly, Joan Leslie, who was developing into a very attractive woman as she edged past her ingenue years at Warners, never appeared in any films of note afterward.

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34 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Repeat Performance is the only noir that comes to mind with a fantasy element (shades of It's a Wonderful Life) to the story line. Its opening scene, set in a high rise apartment on a windy night, has all the classic visual elements of the genre. It's been a while since I last saw it but it's a film worth viewing.  Sadly, Joan Leslie, who was developing into a very attractive woman as she edged past her ingenue years at Warners, never appeared in any films of note afterward.

Re your IAWL correlative comment to Repeat Performance here Tom, is something I found Eddie also mentions in the following YouTube video of him introducing it to a live audience in Seattle a few years back...

 

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

Hey, Eddie stole from me! He called it the film noir version of It's a Wonderful Life.

LOL

Yeah, well, you'll have to remember here Tom that with Eddie's natural bent toward the dark and sinister side of life, there would come a time when he'd occasionally turn to a life of thievery. 

(...and so this shouldn't have surprised you any, huh)

;)

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

LOL

Yeah, well, you'll have to remember here Tom that with Eddie's natural bent toward the dark and sinister side of life, there would come a time when he's occasionally turn to a life of thievery. 

(...and so this shouldn't have surprised you any, huh)

;)

This, indeed, is what comes from a lifetime devoted to noir. Let the Eddie Muller story be a warning to us all.

 

(Pretty dramatic stuff, huh?).

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4 hours ago, TomJH said:

Repeat Performance is the only noir that comes to mind with a fantasy element (shades of It's a Wonderful Life) to the story line. Its opening scene, set in a high rise apartment on a windy night, has all the classic visual elements of the genre. It's been a while since I last saw it but it's a film worth viewing.  Sadly, Joan Leslie, who was developing into a very attractive woman as she edged past her ingenue years at Warners, never appeared in any films of note afterward.

During the Classic Film Noir Era other Fantasy Noir films besides Repeat Performance (1947) were Alias Nick Beal (1949), The Amazing Mr. X (1948), Fear in the Night (1947), The Night Has a Thousand Eyes (1948), and  Nightmare (1956), covered roughly the same territory, there are probably a few more. You can possibly even include It's a Wonderful Life (1946) for the Noir-ish sequence and Val Lewton's The Seventh Victim (1943).

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7 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

During the Classic Film Noir Era other Fantasy Noir films besides Repeat Performance (1947) were Alias Nick Beal (1949), The Amazing Mr. X (1948), Fear in the Night (1947), The Night Has a Thousand Eyes (1948), and  Nightmare (1956), covered roughly the same territory, there are probably a few more. You can possibly even include It's a Wonderful Life (1946) for the Noir-ish sequence and Val Lewton's The Seventh Victim (1943).

Thanks, cigarjoe. I've actually seen three of the noirs you mentioned and had forgotten.

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33 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I haven't seen that one. Sounds interesting.

It has three tales of the supernatural. The middle episode is the one usually cited as the highlight of the film. Edward G. Robinson plays a cynic about palmistry who starts to change after fortune teller Thomas Mitchell (following a number of accurate predictions) sees MURDER in his hand.

gsv-jtv006321.jpg

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On 12/24/2019 at 7:23 PM, TomJH said:

The middle episode is the one usually cited as the highlight of the film. Edward G. Robinson plays a cynic about palmistry who starts to change after fortune teller Thomas Mitchell (following a number of accurate predictions) sees MURDER in his hand.

Yes, that was the most interesting, though the first one with Betty Field as the homely girl hiding behind the pretty mask was good too. I thought the final one with Charles Boyer was the weakest one. 

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An article on this website suggests that Noir Alley will be showing Big Night, the movie from the 90s starring Stanley Tucci. I'm guessing that the actual movie being shown will be Joseph Losey's The Big Night, a movie I've never seen. The Prowler, M, and The Criminal are all mighty good noirs, so I would like to see more of Losey's lesser-known crime films before he rebooted his career in England in the 1960s.

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I appreciate Eddie's impressive introductory comments on Repeat Performance.

He got one fact wrong, however, when he stated that this is the premiere presentation of the film on TCM. I know because I still have a copy on disc of the recording I made of the movie off the channel ten to twelve years ago. The print they had at the time was okay but perhaps a bit washed out, nothing to compare to the restoration of same shown on the channel this weekend. Here are a pair of images from the two versions shown on the channel. I don't know why my computer stretches out the old image to distort it even more.

2019 TCM Print:

evkttAT.png

2009 (or earlier) TCM print

JMVAi8e.png

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