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I enjoyed REPEAT PERFORMANCE. However, I didn't care for Louis Heyward's performance. Eddie mentioned he was panned by the critics when the film was released. I can certainly see why. I am a big fan of Tom Conway. I first saw him in the Falcon movies. I didn't know he and George Sanders were brothers until I did a little research. I'm looking forward to THE BIG SLEEP next week. I've seen it many times, but always enjoy watching it again.

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REPEAT PERFORMANCE -- Joan Leslie acted with an arched left eyebrow (I couldn't figure out if she was doing this on purpose to show us how innately "theatrical" her stage actress character was), Louis  Hayward's performance was just bizarre and could someone explain "a toy store on 5th Avenue" in connection with Richard Basehart's admittance to the insane asylum?

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9 hours ago, TomJH said:

I appreciate Eddie's impressive introductory comments on Repeat Performance.

He got one fact wrong, however, when he stated that this is the premiere presentation of the film on TCM. I know because I still have a copy on disc of the recording I made of the movie off the channel ten to twelve years ago.

Tom,

Are you sure the previous recording was from TCM?  I believe you can verify by looking for the TCM logo at 20-minute intervals throughout.  Just asking to confirm the TCM showings database (not that it really matters much at this point).

As far as the stretching goes, sometimes recordings have an anamorphic-widescreen flag, which causes the display aspect ratio to be 16 by 9 instead of 4 by 3.

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1 hour ago, cmovieviewer said:

Tom,

Are you sure the previous recording was from TCM?  I believe you can verify by looking for the TCM logo at 20-minute intervals throughout.  Just asking to confirm the TCM showings database (not that it really matters much at this point).

As far as the stretching goes, sometimes recordings have an anamorphic-widescreen flag, which causes the display aspect ratio to be 16 by 9 instead of 4 by 3.

I definitely recorded Repeat Performance off TCM at least a decade ago, probably a little more. I know this because TCM was one of only two channels I ever recorded off, the other being Encore Westerns. And I don't think this film is a western. At the end of the print, by the way, it said it was distributed by Fox/Lorber, for what that's worth.

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6 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

REPEAT PERFORMANCE -- Joan Leslie acted with an arched left eyebrow (I couldn't figure out if she was doing this on purpose to show us how innately "theatrical" her stage actress character was), Louis  Hayward's performance was just bizarre and could someone explain "a toy store on 5th Avenue" in connection with Richard Basehart's admittance to the insane asylum?

Yeah, Bg. And I was starting to think that her whole arched eyebrow thing might've been the only way she felt she could project to the audience that she wasn't a COMPETELY saintly wife.

Man, I tell ya, I couldn't believe how so totally understanding and forgiving and, well, so damn NICE Joan made her character come across, and how much CRAP she put up with and without losin' her cool!

In FACT, like Hayward's character, I was beginning to get a little annoyed with how goody-goody she was, MYSELF!!!  LOL

(...and could see, as Eddie mentioned in his wraparound, why the producers swapped the genders of the leads from the original story, and because they feared Joan Leslie wouldn't be believable as the crazy and ultimately evil spouse of the two)

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OH, and btw...

While watching this movie, did anyone else here start noticing a facial resemblance between Louis Hayward and Desi Arnaz?! Or was that just me?

But yeah, and as mentioned by Eddie and by some here, while Hayward sure chewed his fair share of scenery in this flick, especially during the film's ending, I DO have to say I thought his earlier drunken scenes came across fair accurately.

(...but then again, I've known a few "mean drunks" in my life, and so thought he captured their damned craziness pretty darn well)

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Dargo, Louis Hayward always creeps me out.  It's his super-wide mouth -- that smile scares me no matter what role he's playing.

As for Joan Leslie -- remember her character in THE HARD WAY?  With manipulative sister Ida Lupino's help, she becomes a major Broadway star who has playwrights and audiences clamoring for her "talents" (weak singing, dancing and acting)   Totally unbelievable!  And I feel the same way with REPEAT PERFORMANCE.   In my opinion they needed someone with a more sophisticated persona for that part.   And older! 

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14 hours ago, omm said:

Looks to me like organ maestro Jimmy Smith at the piano in the bar scene.

Anyone know if that's really him?

 
 
 
Image result for jimmy smith organ
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

I don't recall seeing Jimmy Smith in a bar scene.    Wow,  I'll have to check that out.      I did see Jimmy in one of his last performances in Los Angeles.   He had to be carried onto the stage but he still swung hard.

 

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4 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

As for Joan Leslie -- remember her character in THE HARD WAY?  With manipulative sister Ida Lupino's help, she becomes a major Broadway star who has playwrights and audiences clamoring for her "talents" (weak singing, dancing and acting)   Totally unbelievable!  And I feel the same way with REPEAT PERFORMANCE.   In my opinion they needed someone with a more sophisticated persona for that part.   And older! 

We're on the same page about the credibility of Joan Leslie in The Hard Way as a Broadway star. It's a good movie, though, and maybe Eddie should schedule it for Noir Alley. After all, it starts with a dame in a mink coat jumping in the river.

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44 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Dargo, Louis Hayward always creeps me out.  It's his super-wide mouth -- that smile scares me no matter what role he's playing.

As for Joan Leslie -- remember her character in THE HARD WAY?  With manipulative sister Ida Lupino's help, she becomes a major Broadway star who has playwrights and audiences clamoring for her "talents" (weak singing, dancing and acting)   Totally unbelievable!  And I feel the same way with REPEAT PERFORMANCE.   In my opinion they needed someone with a more sophisticated persona for that part.   And older! 

While I don't disagree, I think that Joan Leslie's age had a lot to do with fitting the character. An older woman wouldn't have put up with Louis Hayward's  boorish, drunken, abusive behavior towards them. He even says a few times that she's young, probably thinking he could get away with it because she was young  An older woman wouldn't put up with his insults and treating his wife in the demeaning way he did to Joan. 

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Joan Leslie joins the ranks of other Warner Brothers stars who wanted freedom from that studio only to find their careers floundering once they left the studio or, at least, not prospering, as well. Davis and Flynn immediately come to mind (yeh, Bette had All About Eve but what else of real distinction in the immediate years after her departure?). Cagney turned around and returned to the studio after floundering on his own. Lupino would soon concentrate upon becoming a director. Robinson had little of note after Key Largo, though, in his case, the Red Scare hurt him, as well. Bogart, Garfield  and de Havilland seem to be the main exceptions, all three enjoying hits and misses and a few career highlights after leaving the studio. Ironically, though, the two men would both die young.

Joan Leslie? Repeat Performance is a masterpiece compared to what came afterward for her. All the films for which she is remembered today came during her Warners years, frustrated as she may have been cast in the role as ingenue.

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I liked Repeat Performance,what Leslie went through with Hayward was a bit too much,divorce was not a rarity in 1947 ! Hayward was overacting and it was annoying,i was happy when Muller mentioned th NY Times review about Hayward's super hammy performance.Muller gives so much detail on a film I was a bit surprised he did not mention George Antheil who made the music,Antheil worked with Hedy Lamarr,he owned the patent with her for the torpedo galloping frequency  that us now used for cell phones.They gave it to the US gouvernment

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1 hour ago, nakano said:

I liked Repeat Performance,what Leslie went through with Hayward was a bit too much,divorce was not a rarity in 1947 ! Hayward was overacting and it was annoying,

I also enjoyed Repeat Performance.      I wonder if the film would have been better if the A Star is Born theme was explored more,  thus making the husband a more sympathetic character.       The theme is implied with the husband's failing career,  the younger wife's successful one,  and his bitterness that she is somehow responsible .      Instead the husband just comes off as a jerk who deserves what is coming to him and one even a young wife would throw to the curb.

     

 

 

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4 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I don't recall seeing Jimmy Smith in a bar scene.    Wow,  I'll have to check that out.      I did see Jimmy in one of his last performances in Los Angeles.   He had to be carried onto the stage but he still swung hard.

 

I haven't thought of Jimmy Smith in decades. He had to be one of the best jazz organists of his generation, although I always heard Earl Grant was considered to be the top.

I have a Swingin 45 by him-- the theme to the movie "Walk on the Wild Side".

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Enjoyable little picture. Hayward did put on a bit of the ham, but since his character is such an outright

bastard, little harm done. By the time the film comes to a conclusion, I'm kind of hoping he will be killed

a second time. I didn't find Basehart's character to be particularly gay. He's a sensitive poet who later on

is supported by Natalie Schaefer. Maybe he "services" her in exchange for those nice suits. Of course maybe

that's all it took in the late 1940s to be thought of as gay. He also seems to be in love with Joan Leslie, and in

more than just a "platonic" manner. And he can make a claim for self-defense as Hayward was about to

attack Joan. Maybe Raymond Burr will get him off.

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5 hours ago, kingrat said:

We're on the same page about the credibility of Joan Leslie in The Hard Way as a Broadway star. It's a good movie, though, and maybe Eddie should schedule it for Noir Alley. After all, it starts with a dame in a mink coat jumping in the river.

"I love to dance, I love to sing!"  Joan even did a couple of back flips.  

Well, Ida in my book always makes everything noir-ish.  

At least Mildred Pierce Beragon had the good sense not to jump.   

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

While I don't disagree, I think that Joan Leslie's age had a lot to do with fitting the character. An older woman wouldn't have put up with Louis Hayward's  boorish, drunken, abusive behavior towards them. He even says a few times that she's young, probably thinking he could get away with it because she was young  An older woman wouldn't put up with his insults and treating his wife in the demeaning way he did to Joan. 

Hi, lavender!   You make some good points.  Sheila probably idealized him in the way an older, more "seasoned" woman maybe wouldn't have, although love is blind at any age, lol.

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I also enjoyed Repeat Performance.      I wonder if the film would have been better if the A Star is Born theme was explored more,  thus making the husband a more sympathetic character.       The theme is implied with the husband's failing career,  the younger wife's successful one,  and his bitterness that she is somehow responsible .      Instead the husband just comes off as a jerk who deserves what is coming to him and one even a young wife would throw to the curb.

    

Yeah, not a bad thought here, James!

And then considering the thought nobody in this movie ever really confronts Hayward about his boorish behavior when he's drunk, and especially Tom Conway's character who I felt should have, maybe have some character inserted into this flick like the one Jack Carson played in the '54 remake of A Star is Born ?

(...and 'cause I THEN would've REALLY enjoyed seein' that character smack around Hayward a bit and just like Carson did to James Mason at that racetrack, and with Hayworth's character being even MORE deserving of a good smackdown than Mason was!)  ;)

LOL

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6 hours ago, kingrat said:

We're on the same page about the credibility of Joan Leslie in The Hard Way as a Broadway star. It's a good movie, though, and maybe Eddie should schedule it for Noir Alley. After all, it starts with a dame in a mink coat jumping in the river.

When it comes to The Hard Way, which I think is a fine drama, aside from Lupino's edgy, impressive work (yet another performance of her's worthy of an Oscar nomination), I think, too, of Jack Carson's touching performance as a naive, nice guy who is exploited with tragic results. This is one of the highlight performances of Carson's career, bringing pathos and vulnerability to his character. We tend to think of Jack as being loud and boisterous in many of his portrayals. The Hard Way show us a sensitive side to this character actor's talent. I only wish he had had more dramatic opportunities as good as this one. Far too often Warners had a tendency to cast Jack in a lot of minor comedies, often with second tier material he had to enliven. In The Hard Way he brought tears to my eyes.

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I'm not sure I've ever watched The Hard Way, but after all these mentions of it from Bronxie, kingrat and now Tom, I'll have to keep my eye out for it, if and when TCM ever shows it.

(...sounds interesting)

 

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