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1 minute ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Tom,  I agree with you 100 per cent on Jack Carson's performance in THE HARD WAY.   

And I have to say that Dennis Morgan acquitted himself admirably as the cynical half of that show biz partnership.   

I enjoyed watching Morgan and Carson teamed and re-teamed by Warners, their later comedic efforts together the studio's "answer" to Crosby and Hope. I wish Warners had given them better material but I feel their final effort together, the spoofy It's A Great Feeling (with a lot of cameos by Warners stars) had their screen partnership end on a high note. It's nice to note that off screen these two actors were the best of friends, having originally met in Milwaukee before their Hollywood careers took off. After Carson died of cancer in 1963 Morgan became a spokesperson for the American Cancer Association.

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1 minute ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Tom,  I agree with you 100 per cent on Jack Carson's performance in THE HARD WAY.   

And I have to say that Dennis Morgan acquitted himself admirably as the cynical half of that show biz partnership.   

Speaking of which...

I don't know why it seems when the name Dennis Morgan is raised among the assembled here, it often gets met with a chorus of "Meh, he's okay I guess!"

(...'cause I always thought Morgan not only had a great tenor singing voice, but was also pretty darn good in almost any dramatic part he was cast in, to boot!) 

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3 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Speaking of which...

I don't know why it seems when the name Dennis Morgan is raised among the assembled here, it often gets met with a chorus of "Meh, he's okay I guess!"

(...'cause I always thought Morgan not only had a great tenor singing voice, but was also pretty darn good in almost any dramatic part he was cast in, to boot!) 

Morgan even stood up dramatically well to scene stealers James Cagney and Alan Hale in Captains of the Clouds, and was an amiable light leading man to Stanwyck in Christmas in Connecticutt. That takes some skill in both drama and romantic comedy.

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Enjoyable little picture. Hayward did put on a bit of the ham, but since his character is such an outright

bastard, little harm done. By the time the film comes to a conclusion, I'm kind of hoping he will be killed

a second time. I didn't find Basehart's character to be particularly gay. He's a sensitive poet who later on

is supported by Natalie Schaefer. Maybe he "services" her in exchange for those nice suits. Of course maybe

that's all it took in the late 1940s to be thought of as gay. He also seems to be in love with Joan Leslie, and in

more than just a "platonic" manner. And he can make a claim for self-defense as Hayward was about to

attack Joan. Maybe Raymond Burr will get him off.

Agree with this post  totally Vautrin.  As a matter of fact, when Basehart kills Hayward I was thinking exactly the same thing, he can get off due to self-defense, he saved Joan. Of course he does say he's insane, so he'll probably be put away anyway, although I thought he was the smartest character in the film. I loved that last line of his about fate not caring how to get to the outcome as long as the outcome is the same ( something to that effect_)

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2 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Hi, lavender!   You make some good points.  Sheila probably idealized him in the way an older, more "seasoned" woman maybe wouldn't have, although love is blind at any age, lol.

Hi, Bronxgirl , so glad to see you on the bds. , you've been missed :) Paula's character was a good example of what an older, "seasoned" woman would have thought of Hayward! She cut him down  to size ( of course she was a  b---h and had no problem hurting  Joan's character by having an affair with Hayward) 

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Saw another film today that was quite noir-ish and another fantasy with quite a cast John Garfield, Paul Henreid, Sydney Greenstreet, Eleanor Parker, Edmund Gwenn, George Tobias, George Coulouris, Faye Emerson, and a few others about a bunch of dead people on an ocean liner who don't know they're dead Between Two Worlds (1944).

Between Two Worlds Poster

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22 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Saw another film today that was quite noir-ish and another fantasy with quite a cast John Garfield, Paul Henreid, Sydney Greenstreet, Eleanor Parker, Edmund Gwenn, George Tobias    George Tobias, George Coulouris, Faye Emerson, and a few others about a bunch of dead people on an ocean liner who don't know they're dead Between Two Worlds (1944).

Between Two Worlds Poster

I'm sure you know this was a remake of this early talkie 1930 film...

ob2.jpg

(...it starred Leslie Howard, Doug Fairbanks Jr. and Helen Chandler)

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

No I didn't know, have you seen both?

Yep, a few years back after TCM showed the original.

Having been familiar with the remake since first watching it as a teenager back in the late-'60s and liking it quite a bit (it might've been my first exposure to John Garfield in fact), I found I was constantly comparing it to the original as I watched the original.

(...and ya know what?...even though the original was made during a time in which moviemaking was a little more primitive and thus prone to be more stagebound, I found it held my interest almost as well as the remake had done for these many years)

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4 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Agree with this post  totally Vautrin.  As a matter of fact, when Basehart kills Hayward I was thinking exactly the same thing, he can get off due to self-defense, he saved Joan. Of course he does say he's insane, so he'll probably be put away anyway, although I thought he was the smartest character in the film. I loved that last line of his about fate not caring how to get to the outcome as long as the outcome is the same ( something to that effect_)

I didn't pay over much attention to the details of Basehart's supposed insanity. Back then it was easier to get someone

into an asylum and with Schaefer's money and influence, who knows. After the year starts over again it seems that

whatever Joan does to avoid a repeat of her husband's death doesn't work and fate will out, even when there is a

change in circumstance, like his leg injury.  I was amused when she thought it would be enough to bring Conway

back home with her to avoid a repeat of what happened before. Why not get in a car and head west? Yes, in the

end the same fate occurred, it was just carried out by a different person.

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13 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Hi, Bronxgirl , so glad to see you on the bds. , you've been missed :) Paula's character was a good example of what an older, "seasoned" woman would have thought of Hayward! She cut him down  to size ( of course she was a  b---h and had no problem hurting  Joan's character by having an affair with Hayward) 

Oh thank you so much, lavender.

It took me a while to figure out that "Paula" (Virginia Field) was Vivian Leigh's roommate, best friend, and fellow, um, "good-time girl" in the 1940 WATERLOO BRIDGE.  

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Tom, the first time I saw Jack and Dennis as Runkel and Collins in THE HARD WAY (back in the 1960's!) I do remember thinking to myself that they made a great screen team.  Imagine my surprise when I found out Warner Bros. had the same idea, lol.

 

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Woke up two hours ago with TCM running to come upon the middle of what looked and sounded like a scene-by-scene, word-for-word remake of HIGH SIERRA.   

Except that Shelley Winters does the mambo.

Why did they even bother???

I slept a thousand times.

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47 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

One more important element about Dennis Morgan.....

He was GORGEOUS.

I'd take him over Errol Flynn, Ty Power, Clark Gable and any number of classic Hollywood male sex symbols.

 

I don't have a horse in this race for what I hope is understood for obvious reasons, yet I get the proverbial perverse satisfaction to see what might be perceived as an "unpopular" opinion burst to the refreshing light of day. To see a sleeper candidate eclipse the old and tired exaltation of those you mention as HMSS, especially that miserable, phony Tyrone who was such a mediocre actor and gets the mushy, gushy, praise. Maybe I just like the underdog. Way to go, Dennis ...

:lol:

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I didn't realize this re-make of High Sierra even existed. I looked at the synopsis on Wikipedia and it sounds like you are right, Bronx Girl; "why did they bother". As a Bogart fan I can't imagine anyone else in the role. Also, the Wiki recap didn't mention Pard. I thought he was a key part of the "bad guy/good guy" irony that was Roy Earle.

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30 minutes ago, laffite said:

I don't have a horse in this race for what I hope is understood for obvious reasons, yet I get the proverbial perverse satisfaction to see what might be perceived as an "unpopular" opinion burst to the refreshing light of day. To see a sleeper candidate eclipse the old and tired exaltation of those you mention as HMSS, especially that miserable, phony Tyrone who was such a mediocre actor and gets the mushy, gushy, praise. Maybe I just like the underdog. Way to go, Dennis ...

:lol:

Have you seen Power in Nightmare Alley or Abandon Ship? If not, you may change your opinion about him as an actor afterward to see how effective he could be when he had a good dramatic role.

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42 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Have you seen Power in Nightmare Alley or Abandon Ship? If not, you may change your opinion about him as an actor afterward to see how effective he could be when he had a good dramatic role.

I will try those. I appreciate your reason and civility. My effusive attack is at least a small part untoward and irascible. In my right mind (if I have one) I suppose I must admit that he can't be that bad. I am "victimized" by your assertive stance (as opposed to an aggressive one, which is the norm) in being somewhat disarmed in general, and amenable in particular with this commitment I now own to see those films.

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2 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Oh thank you so much, lavender.

It took me a while to figure out that "Paula" (Virginia Field) was Vivian Leigh's roommate, best friend, and fellow, um, "good-time girl" in the 1940 WATERLOO BRIDGE.  

 Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year., Bronxgirl  :)

LOL Yes Virginia Field, she was Paula, the author of the play that Joan's character stars in. She had the affair with Hayward. She's the older woman I was referring to. 

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31 minutes ago, laffite said:

I will try those. I appreciate your reason and civility. My effusive attack is at least a small part untoward and irascible. In my right mind (if I have one) I suppose I must admit that he can't be that bad. I am "victimized" by your assertive stance (as opposed to an aggressive one, which is the norm) in being somewhat disarmed in general, and amenable in particular with this commitment I now own to see those films.

Well, I'm glad to see your flexibility on the subject. One more Power film I would recommend is The Mark of Zorro in which he is not only a romantic swashbuckling presence (indulging in one of the great screen duels near the end) but also demonstrates a sly facility for dry wit in the scenes in which he poses as a fop. A few ladies on these boards have also expressed an appreciation for how well he filled out some tight fitting pants in a dance sequence. The latter appraisal may, indeed, be of less interest to you.

Abandon Ship, by the way, was Power's third last film and he completely eschewed his glamour image in favour of a strong dramatic portrayal in a gripping tale of survival at sea. Nightmare Alley is a film with which many film noir fans are familiar and appreciate. It has to be ranked as a classic.

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1 hour ago, Hoganman1 said:

I didn't realize this re-make of High Sierra even existed. I looked at the synopsis on Wikipedia and it sounds like you are right, Bronx Girl; "why did they bother". As a Bogart fan I can't imagine anyone else in the role. Also, the Wiki recap didn't mention Pard. I thought he was a key part of the "bad guy/good guy" irony that was Roy Earle.

The remake did include Pard but I preferred the original HS doggie.

HIGH SIERRA made Bogart (I'm a big fan too) a bone fide star; he brought a brittle, unsentimental yet genuine pathos to that role.   Jack Palance, just.....no.

And poor Shelley.   Could not improve upon Ida Lupino. 

 

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10 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

 Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year., Bronxgirl  :)

LOL Yes Virginia Field, she was Paula, the author of the play that Joan's character stars in. She had the affair with Hayward. She's the older woman I was referring to. 

The same to you, lavender!  

Yep, I did know that was the character; just couldn't automatically connect Field with "Kitty" in WATERLOO BRIDGE as I was watching REPEAT PERFORMANCE.  I knew she looked familiar, though....

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