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Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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5 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

The same to you, lavender!  

Yep, I did know that was the character; just couldn't automatically connect Field with "Kitty" in WATERLOO BRIDGE as I was watching REPEAT PERFORMANCE.  I knew she looked familiar, though....

Thank You :)

It's funny, as much as I love Waterloo Bridge, if someone had written the name Paula, Greer Garson in Random Harvest would have popped into my head ( even though she was such a good girl) We really do know and love our classic films.

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2 hours ago, laffite said:

I don't have a horse in this race for what I hope is understood for obvious reasons, yet I get the proverbial perverse satisfaction to see what might be perceived as an "unpopular" opinion burst to the refreshing light of day. To see a sleeper candidate eclipse the old and tired exaltation of those you mention as HMSS, especially that miserable, phony Tyrone who was such a mediocre actor and gets the mushy, gushy, praise. Maybe I just like the underdog. Way to go, Dennis ...

:lol:

lol, I think a lot of ladies love Dennis just for his looks -- so how nice to discover he could act as well!  And the voice.....(sigh)  A triple threat.  Mind you, I don't see him playing anything like Stanton Carlisle in NIGHTMARE ALLEY -- for me the thing that Tyrone had going for him was a somewhat serious, even saturnine persona  that seemed to be appreciated even back in 1939 when he played an anti-hero in that movie (the title escapes me right now) which I believe was a thinly disguised biography of Fannie Brice.  Power was the Nick Arnstein character.   

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10 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Thank You :)

It's funny, as much as I love Waterloo Bridge, if someone had written the name Paula, Greer Garson in Random Harvest would have popped into my head ( even though she was such a good girl) We really do know and love our classic films.

Ha!  Yes, we do!  

Oooh, and I'm also thinking of another Paula -- Ingrid Bergman in GASLIGHT.

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58 minutes ago, laffite said:

I will try those. I appreciate your reason and civility. My effusive attack is at least a small part untoward and irascible. In my right mind (if I have one) I suppose I must admit that he can't be that bad. I am "victimized" by your assertive stance (as opposed to an aggressive one, which is the norm) in being somewhat disarmed in general, and amenable in particular with this commitment I now own to see those films.

Nightmare Alley and Abandon Ship are outstanding films and Ty was outstanding in them. Also add The Eddy Duchin Story to the list. Watch his hands as he plays the piano, he trained and took lessons for months and months to make it realistic. His performance is great and he was a great Zorro.

Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year laffite

ps I'm not holding your TY post against you :D

 

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Oh it just popped into my head (I resisted googling; need to exercise my Baby Boomer brain) -- ROSE OF WASHINGTON SQUARE.   Ty looked nothing like the real Nicky Arnstein, thank God!  

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Lafitte, you've never seen NIGHTMARE ALLEY?

Put it first thing on your must-see list for 2020!

Ty is tremendously effective.  He's surrounded by a terrific supporting cast -- Joan Blondell, Ian Keith, Helen Walker and Coleen Gray.

 

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37 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Nightmare Alley and Abandon Ship are outstanding films and Ty was outstanding in them. Also add The Eddy Duchin Story to the list. Watch his hands as he plays the piano, he trained and took lessons for months and months to make it realistic. His performance is great and he was a great Zorro.

Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year laffite

ps I'm not holding your TY post against you :D

 

Lavender, if you're interested there's a review of The Eddy Duchin Story in I Just Watched written at the beginning of this month.  I couldn't agree more with the reviewer.

 

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Glad you agree with the reviewer LOL. Well written  review as usual Tom. Glad that you mentioned Ty was "dramatically effective" and that you mention how well he managed his portrayal of Eddie Duchin at the piano. Yes, while I agree it's a soap opera type of biography, it's a very good, enjoyable one. Between the incredibly beautiful location shots of Manhattan ( remember I grew up in NY) so I really appreciated the look of the film. The scenes of Kim and Ty walking thru Central Park in the rain were gorgeous. All the NY shots were glorious. As you wrote The Eddy Duchin Story was a big box office hit and was nominated for 4 Oscars although Ty was left out and I thought he deserved the nomination.

I thought your review was pretty accurate, although, I would have given it a 4 out 5, but I guess I'm either more generous than you or just not as tough LOL. 

At any rate, I have a tape of the film and I do watch it when ever TCM shows it, I enjoy the film that much and most certainly enjoy watching Ty in another of his excellent performances.

Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year, Tom :)

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46 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Well written  review as usual Tom. Glad that you mentioned Ty was "dramatically effective" and that you mention how well he managed his portrayal of Eddie Duchin at the piano. Yes, while I agree it's a soap opera type of biography, it's a very good, enjoyable one. Between the incredibly beautiful location shots of Manhattan ( remember I grew up in NY) so I really appreciated the look of the film. The scenes of Kim and Ty walking thru Central Park in the rain were gorgeous. All the NY shots were glorious. As you wrote The Eddy Duchin Story was a big box office hit and was nominated for 4 Oscars although Ty was left out and I thought he deserved the nomination.

I thought your review was pretty accurate, although, I would have given it a 4 out 5, but I guess I'm either more generous than you or just not as tough LOL. 

At any rate, I have a tape of the film and I do watch it when ever TCM shows it, I enjoy the film that much and most certainly enjoy watching Ty in another of his excellent performances.

Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year, Tom :)

It really is tragically ironic, isn't it, that just as Power finally started to get the kind of dramatic roles that effectively showed off his skill as an actor (Long Gray Line, Eddy Duchin, Abandon Ship, Witness for the Prosecution) he should suddenly be gone at 44 from a heart attack.

Eddy Duchin sure has a wonderfully romantic view of NYC, doesn't it? (Unlike the noirs discussed on this thread).

Happy New Year to you, too, lavender.

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4 minutes ago, TomJH said:

It really is tragically ironic, isn't it, that just as Power finally started to get the kind of dramatic roles that effectively showed off his skill as an actor (Long Gray Line, Eddy Duchin, Abandon Ship, Witness for the Prosecution) he should suddenly be gone at 44 from a heart attack.

Eddy Duchin sure has a wonderfully romantic view of NYC, doesn't it? (Unlike the noirs discussed on this thread).

Happy New Year to you, too, lavender.

Thanks Tom  :)

Yes, it's terribly tragic and ironic and a great loss to classic films. He certainly had become a great actor and important presence on the screen.  The location scenes in NY were incredibly romantic  and that alone makes The Eddy Duchin Story a worthwhile watch. Thanks for mentioning The Long Grey Line and Witness For the Prosecution, love both those films and again, both show us  "his skill as an actor".  We should recommend those 2 to laffite.

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20 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Saw another film today that was quite noir-ish and another fantasy with quite a cast John Garfield, Paul Henreid, Sydney Greenstreet, Eleanor Parker, Edmund Gwenn, George Tobias, George Coulouris, Faye Emerson, and a few others about a bunch of dead people on an ocean liner who don't know they're dead Between Two Worlds (1944).

Between Two Worlds Poster

I'm a big fan of Between Two Worlds, with the Warner Brothers stock company sinking its teeth into some meaty roles. Edward A. Blatt must be the most obscure director who ever made a film this good. The cinematography is definitely noir-influenced. I do like Outward Bound, but prefer the remake, where I think every actor is an improvement on the actor in the original, as good as they are. I also like the added characters. Sutton Vane, author of the very successful play Outward Bound, was a veteran of WWI who suffered from what we would now call PTSD. He was gay, and unfortunately, he eventually killed himself, IIRC.

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5 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Lafitte, you've never seen NIGHTMARE ALLEY?

Yeah, I know. And I have experienced profound guilt about that. However, help is on the way. I now have TCM for the first time in years. Now, don't tell me that TCM doesn't play it.

5 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

ps I'm not holding your TY post against you  :D

And, no kidding, I was thinking about you while I was executing that post. I thought, oh well, maybe she'll forgive me. And you did! Thanks, dear friend. ❤️

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31 minutes ago, laffite said:

.And, no kidding, I was thinking about you while I was executing that post. I thought, oh well, maybe she'll forgive me. And you did! Thanks, dear friend. ❤️

I figured you were thinking of me when you wrote that post LOL and of course I forgive you   ;)❤️

the list for you is

Nightmare Alley

Abandon Ship

The Long Grey Line

Witness for the Prosecution

The Eddy Duchin Story

Zorro

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2 hours ago, laffite said:

Yeah, I know. And I have experienced profound guilt about that. However, help is on the way. I now have TCM for the first time in years. Now, don't tell me that TCM doesn't play it.

 

Forget that guilt stuff!   It's not a movie TCM plays as much as something like  A FACE IN THE CROWD, so be patient, lol.

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14 hours ago, laffite said:

Yeah, I know. And I have experienced profound guilt about that. However, help is on the way. I now have TCM for the first time in years. Now, don't tell me that TCM doesn't play it.

And, no kidding, I was thinking about you while I was executing that post. I thought, oh well, maybe she'll forgive me. And you did! Thanks, dear friend. ❤️

Nightmare Alley is currently available on You Tube with two copies (one very nice, the other too dark). Ty Power had to battle Zanuck to have the film made and Stan Carlisle remained his favourite role, even if the film was seen by few as it bombed at the 1947 box office. The actor would probably be thrilled that we're still talking about it seventy years later and some call it as classic. It's the first Hollywood "A" production that dealt with the "spook racket," charlatans who exploit those who believe in an after life. The film also has fine work by a calculating, ice cold Helen Walker, a sensual Joan Blondell and Ian Keith in a great performance as a former great con man who has turned into a rummy.

It could be a very long wait for TCM to show it as it is a Fox film.

nightmare-alley-cinematography.jpg

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About Between Two Worlds: I've seen it, I think, three times.  TCM actually airs it relatively often. The first time I saw it, I did not like it at all.  Then I saw it again, a year or two later. Somehow in the intervening time between these two viewings, the film had got better!  I think part of my problem with it the first time was, I did not like the Eleanor Parker character. I thought she was silly. But then, at that time (first viewing several years ago), I did not much like Eleanor Parker anyway.  But I've since changed my mind about her, I quite like this actress now.

My change of mind came about partly because I've since seen her in other films where she plays really interesting characters, but it's also thanks to lavenderblue, who drew my attention to one or two of Eleanor's better roles (for instance,  "Scaramouche".) She pointed out that Eleanor Parker is actually quite a talented and versatile actress, capable of both serious drama (as in "Between Two Worlds" and "Man with the Golden Arm")  but also comedy, as in "Scaramouche" and "A Millionaire for Christy". And look how good she was in "Caged". 

Anyway, now I quite like "Between Two Worlds". A heavenly piece of film-making (sorry couldn't resist.)

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John Garfield ranked Between Two Worlds as his worst film. "It was strange and it was mystic and it was bad," he said.

On the other hand, legendary musical composer Erich Wolfgang Korngold, best remembered today for his film scores for Robin Hood, The Sea Hawk and Kings Row, ranked his impressive score for Between Two Worlds as the favourite of his career.

 

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I couldn't care less about who killed who in Howard Hawks' marvelously entertaining The Big Sleep. In fact trying to understand the film's intricate plot is a bit of a bore to me (though I understand whose who enjoy the challenge). What counts for me is the stylish black and white noir ambience, the sexual word bantering, the women swooning before the ultra cool Marlowe, who is virtually a sexual magnet in this film, and a couple of memorable scenes of violence.

So many moments from this film stay in my memory even though I probably haven't watched the film all the way through for at least a decade.

"What's the matter? Afraid it's poison?" a cold blooded Canino asks poor Jonesy as he hands him a fatal drink. That is arguably the moment seared into my memory more than any other.

But there are also the film's lighter moments, such as the famous racetrack analogy sexual bantering scene between Bogart and Bacall.  At this moment these two actors and the witty rapartee bring us a delicious sense of worldly sophistication that is impossible to resist.

But then there is the moment of thumb sucking Carmen (Martha Vickers in the role for which she will be remembered) impulsively falling back into Marlowe's arms, of that cute perky female cabbie (Joy Barlow) giving the private eye her phone number and, of course, a sleepy eyed Dorothy Malone taking off her glasses and literally letting down her hair for an afternoon frolic with the P.I. in a bookshop suddenly closed for the day. Why do I never see cab drivers or book store sellers like these?

But that, of course, is one reason, among many others, why I tune into the tough guy romantic fantasy world of The Big Sleep, a film I am definitely due to watch again, and soon.

1946-the-big-sleep-bogart-bacall.jpg

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Yeah, I mentioned that exchange of innuendo between Bogey and Bacall before in these forums and long considered it one of the "raciest" conversations in movie history.  ;)   And the plot always seemed straightforward to me...

Sternwood hires Marlowe to find out if his daughter Carmen's "gambling debts" are really that, and who's applying the muscle.  Then Vivian butts in thinking he was hired to find out who's blackmailing her and why.  Everything else is just designed to interfere with Marlowe getting at the truth,  and this causes Marlowe's curiosity to not let it go.  All that extracurricular shooting and killing is what confuses the story.   But then, that's my take on it, which could be as far off as anybody else's guess.  ;) 

And too,  like Tom said,   there's many reasons to like this "stylish black and white" noir.  For me, the earliest scene "burned" into my memory(from WAY back) is the close set line of bullet holes in Geiger's front door as a Tommy gun cuts Mars near in half.  As I got older with each viewing,  what burned into my memory were the leggy  "broads" working in Eddie Mars' casino.  ;)   

:( and how come I never  got a cab with a driver as cute as Marlowe did?  ;)    

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

Yeah, I mentioned that exchange of innuendo between Bogey and Bacall before in these forums and long considered it one of the "raciest" conversations in movie history.  ;)   And the plot always seemed straightforward to me...

Sternwood hires Marlowe to find out if his daughter Carmen's "gambling debts" are really that, and who's applying the muscle.  Then Vivian butts in thinking he was hired to find out who's blackmailing her and why.  Everything else is just designed to interfere with Marlowe getting at the truth,  and this causes Marlowe's curiosity to not let it go.  All that extracurricular shooting and killing is what confuses the story.   But then, that's my take on it, which could be as far off as anybody else's guess.  ;) 

And too,  like Tom said,   there's many reasons to like this "stylish black and white" noir.  For me, the earliest scene "burned" into my memory(from WAY back) is the close set line of bullet holes in Geiger's front door as a Tommy gun cuts Mars near in half.  As I got older with each viewing,  what burned into my memory were the leggy  "broads" working in Eddie Mars' casino.  ;)   

:( and how come I never  got a cab with a driver as cute as Marlowe did?  ;)    

Sepiatone

I think the female cab drivers were a left over from WW II when all the male cab drivers were driving trucks for the military.   Hollywood probably hung onto it as a good way to place more starlets in roles.  As with the "leggy  broads."

I never realized the movie didn't make sense until people on TCM and elsewhere began to say it didn't.  Regardless, makes enough sense to me and as Eddie said, it's good entertainment.

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Thanks to Eddie Muller in his comments today for giving a plug to the performance of Sonia Darrin, as Agnes, the bookstore clerk Jonsey is crazy about, in THE BIG SLEEP. She gives a very solid performance in the film but, incredibly, the actress was unbilled. According to both IMDB and Wiki Darrin, born in 1924, is still alive at 95. Anyone else find it a bit ironic that an unbilled player in the film (with a fair sized role including sharing a couple of dialogue scenes with Bogart) is, possibly, the only living cast member of this famous film today?

tumblr_pdza9e4L831w3xsa8o1_400.jpg

800px-The_Big_Sleep_-_Behind_the_scenes_

That's Sonia, second from the left behind director Hawks.

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I think the lady cab driver was not really a cab driver, just a ho with a driver's license.

 

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So much has been said  about "The Big Sleep",  I don't think I have anything original to add. I'll just say I agree with Eddie M. that it's not what could be called a "classic" noir. In fact, as I've said here more than once, it's kind of a noir comedy. Bit of a dark comedy, maybe, what with all those murders (especially the one of poor Jonesy- why did the menacing Canino have to kill him?), but still, there are many scenes that make me laugh. I'll argue with anyone that it's a comedy almost as much as it is a noir.

It is a crime that Sonia Darrin isn't credited. Agnes is an important character, and a very entertaining one. Why on earth was she not credited in the film? She's pretty funny too. I love the way she keeps trying to say that Joe Brody gives her a pain "right in the----" and keeps getting interrupted. 

The thing about "The Big Sleep" is, it's a lot of fun. I'm one of those who couldn't care less about the plot. I just love the world of the film, the streets of L.A., all those luggage and grocery and of course book shops (yes I know it's all a set), the big old cars, the almost continuous rain and mist, and that cool old house at the top of the hill where so much bad stuff takes place, the one with the Buddha head doubling as a camera. I'd like to rent it from Eddie Mars myself. 

By the way, I worked in a book store for years, and I never had any customers like Humphrey Bogart, pulling a bottle of whiskey (?) out of his pocket and asking me to take off my glasses. And I never got to decide "I guess we're closed for the rest of the afternoon." Such a delightful scene, that.

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Okay, lets see here. At last count we have:

Tom and Sepia disappointed that they've never encountered  a cab driver or female book store clerk as hot as Joy Barlow or Dorothy Malone.

MissW disappointed that while working as a book store clerk, no customer she ever encountered was intriguing enough to tempt her close her shop early and, ahem,  party with him.

Cid who's never cared one way or the other about the minutia.

Vautrin who's still looking forward to someday encountering a female cab driver that moonlights into another profession during work hours.

And THEN there's always James, and who'll have the hots for Martha Vickers until the day he goes to his final reward.

(...did I miss anyone here???)

;)

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A lady cab driver?! 
 

How revolting. 

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