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5 minutes ago, mr6666 said:

"..... due to the somewhat poor sound quality of the film. "

-agree........

what was THAT all about?? :(

Yes, I noticed that sometimes the soundtrack had a static-y kind of sound , which interfered with hearing the dialogue.Also, there were times when the music - whether background or part of the scene (like in that nightclub) was so loud it overwhelmed the dialogue. The second thing couldn't be helped, but as for the background white noise that occurred sometimes, I'm surprised it wasn't "cleaned up". But maybe that's hard to do, I don't know.

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Breaking news !  Ah ! I found the library scene in "The Big Sleep" !  Thanks to a very helpful and knowledgable source here, I researched this and found the scene in question. Bogart is indeed in an actual library. I remember now, he's just trying to garner some esoteric information about rare books so he can have an excuse to go to Geiger's Rare Books shop and inquire about "Ben Hur" with a missing page or something.  He needed some legitimate rare book fact(s) to research Geiger's Rare Book Shop.  Why did I not remember this?  No excuse, except it's quite a short scene, less than a minute I think - and there's no dialogue. And certainly no sexy librarian. (Not that anyone claimed there was.)

I do enjoy that scene where Bogart adjusts his hat and puts on some nerdy looking glasses to look , well, nerdy. His conversation with Agnes is hilarious, especially when he goes, "You do sell books here, don't you?  Hmm?"  and Agnes snaps, "What do these look like, grapefruit?"  Fun stuff.

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THE BIG NIGHT,  eh.  Poor Jack Junior, inherited none of the Barrymore talent.

Weird little movie.  I wonder if Scorcese saw this -- that sidewalk scene with the beautiful nightclub singer reminded me a bit of Harvey Keitel's tentative overtures towards the African American go-go dancer in MEAN STREETS. 

Dorothy Comingore had what?  Five minutes tops in this thing? I didn't find her  memorable so I'm wondering what Eddie saw in order to tell us "she gives a vivid performance".   In CITIZEN KANE yes, but not here.

 

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6 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

In my experience, the "hotness" of librarians is due to their going through menopause.  ;)

Sepiatone

I think we're talking about two different types of hotness. 

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Fairly entertaining flick, as interesting for the late night peregrinations as for the revenge angle. I still

don't get why Foster groveled and let himself be beat up by Judge, except for the fact that there were

two thugs in the background who were ready to take action if he didn't. So he didn't marry Judge's

sister and the airhead killed herself. Big deal. I wouldn't stand a beating for that. Johnny was right to

seek revenge, though I would have limited it to breaking Judge's cane and kicking the hell out of

him. The professor was an interesting character for a while, but he quickly got tiresome. Put a cork

in it buddy.  I was somewhat puzzled by the ending. Since Judge wasn't killed and Barrymore admitted to

being the one who was there, why are the cops not letting his father go at the end? Whatever. And

as a four eyes I admire Barrymore's freedom to wear or not wear his glasses. At only 75 minutes,

this is a pretty easy ride. 

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Seems like most of us generally like the same parts of The Big Night and are less fond of the teen angst. John Barrymore Jr. is an adequate actor, perhaps more, but without the kind of star power that would make us care more about his character. I think some of the supporting performances are very good. I'm not sure I've ever seen a better performance by Preston Foster; Howland Chamberlin puts so much into the small role of the bartender Flanagan who has been a kind of substitute parent (mother, in effect?) to Johnny; Howard St. John is a hissable but believable villain; Dorothy Comingore does well with a small role (I actually find her rather hard to take in Citizen Kane); and Philip Bourneuf makes the alcoholic doctor of philosophy a memorable character. I also like the long take where Barrymore goes on and on to Joan Lorring, who is at the left of the shot and seems about to respond or interrupt several times but doesn't. That's clever directing. Losey has quite a few nice directorial touches. The two twists toward the end of the film are nice, too.

I also like the kind of free-floating sexual attraction Barrymore feels toward Comingore, Lorring, and Mauri Lynn, without his having much idea of how to proceed. Losey and the actors handle this well, I think. It seems very true to life.

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14 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Fairly entertaining flick, as interesting for the late night peregrinations as for the revenge angle. I still

don't get why Foster groveled and let himself be beat up by Judge, except for the fact that there were

two thugs in the background who were ready to take action if he didn't. So he didn't marry Judge's

sister and the airhead killed herself. Big deal. I wouldn't stand a beating for that. Johnny was right to

seek revenge, though I would have limited it to breaking Judge's cane and kicking the hell out of

him. The professor was an interesting character for a while, but he quickly got tiresome. Put a cork

in it buddy.  I was somewhat puzzled by the ending. Since Judge wasn't killed and Barrymore admitted to

being the one who was there, why are the cops not letting his father go at the end? Whatever. And

as a four eyes I admire Barrymore's freedom to wear or not wear his glasses. At only 75 minutes,

this is a pretty easy ride. 

I also did not understand the ending either.  Also, why couldn't Preston Foster tell the girl that he was married, but that he was filing for divorce under abandonment?

Overall, entertaining but not one I'll watch again.  Story just does not seem to be that tight.

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16 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I think we're talking about two different types of hotness. 

No doubt,  but I was referring to the only "hotness" the librarians I'VE dealt with over the years was capable of.  The only sexy librarians I've ever seen were in movies.

Usually PORN.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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No one's mentioned there's a loose end plot thread at the end of "The Big Night".  After the boxing match, George  (John Barrymore Jr.) slugs a man who's trying to prevent him from exiting the washroom. The man is the same guy who earlier bullied him into giving up the money from the ticket he'd sold (by pretending he was police.) The actor, by the way, is Emile Meyer, who's appeared in many noirs and other films of the '50s  (notably "Shane".)

Anyway, George finally punches the bully in frustration, because he 's in a hurry to leave and pursue Al Judge.  It's suggested that Peckinpaugh (the bully), has been rendered unconsciousness or pehaps even killed by George. We saw one or two people rushing out of the men's room looking alarmed. And later, when George finally meets with Judge, Judge says something about it -- a rap for "manslaughter" or something??

So,  (a) am I right about that, that this bully (played by Emile Meyer) has been accidentally killed or seriously injured by George  and (b) if so, how come it never comes up again?

Any suggestions?

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

No one's mentioned there's a loose end plot thread at the end of "The Big Night".  After the boxing match, George  (John Barrymore Jr.) slugs a man who's trying to prevent him from exiting the washroom. The man is the same guy who earlier bullied him into giving up the money from the ticket he'd sold (by pretending he was police.) The actor, by the way, is Emile Meyer, who's appeared in many noirs and other films of the '50s  (notably "Shane".)

Anyway, George finally punches the bully in frustration, because he 's in a hurry to leave and pursue Al Judge.  It's suggested that Peckinpaugh (the bully), has been rendered unconsciousness or pehaps even killed by George. We saw one or two people rushing out of the men's room looking alarmed. And later, when George finally meets with Judge, Judge says something about it -- a rap for "manslaughter" or something??

So,  (a) am I right about that, that this bully (played by Emile Meyer) has been accidentally killed or seriously injured by George  and (b) if so, how come it never comes up again?

Any suggestions?

My interpretation from what I understood The Judge to say was that Peckinpaugh had filed charges for assault and battery.  As you note that is another loose end.  Seems Barrymore should be under arrest rather than Preston.

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20 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

THE BIG NIGHT,  eh.  Poor Jack Junior, inherited none of the Barrymore talent.

Weird little movie.  I wonder if Scorcese saw this -- that sidewalk scene with the beautiful nightclub singer reminded me a bit of Harvey Keitel's tentative overtures towards the African American go-go dancer in MEAN STREETS. 

Dorothy Comingore had what?  Five minutes tops in this thing? I didn't find her  memorable so I'm wondering what Eddie saw in order to tell us "she gives a vivid performance".   In CITIZEN KANE yes, but not here.

 

Yeah, Or the looks. Film had a few good sequences, but overall, not a film I'd watch again.

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22 minutes ago, TheCid said:

My interpretation from what I understood The Judge to say was that Peckinpaugh had filed charges for assault and battery.  As you note that is another loose end.  Seems Barrymore should be under arrest rather than Preston.

The whole thing with Judge was handled badly. I couldnt figure out why a sportswriter would be caning some saloon owner as if he were some sort of mobster. (Judge). Even when its sorted out at the end, it's so hard to hear the dialogue, it can still be confusing.

In the night club scene, it was so hard to hear the dialogue, I wasnt sure what the relationship was with the blonde and Barrymore's drinking buddy until later.

Did anyone else feel there was a homosexual vibe with the older prof.? It felt like he was picking up the young kid and getting him drunk. It later turns out he's married and a cheater, but I still felt it was there even after that.

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3 hours ago, TheCid said:

I also did not understand the ending either.  Also, why couldn't Preston Foster tell the girl that he was married, but that he was filing for divorce under abandonment?

Overall, entertaining but not one I'll watch again.  Story just does not seem to be that tight.

Yeah, agree. Not something I'd watch again. Had some good scenes here and there, but the writing and plot wasn't "tight" as you say.......

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23 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

I wasn't that impressed with THE BIG NIGHT. I guess all of Noir Alley's features aren't going to suit my taste. I did find Eddie's outro about the blacklisting interesting too. 

Hopefully, next week will be more my cup of tea. It's only a couple of weeks before we lose Noir Alley until March to make room for 31 Days of Oscar.

I forgot about that! :(  I HATE FEBRUARY.

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21 hours ago, TheCid said:

I think it was something like: "You are very beautiful even if you are not.... "and he did not finish, but the implication was that he was going to say white.  He did apologize for what it is worth.

I think it was even if you are.....

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7 hours ago, TheCid said:

I also did not understand the ending either.  Also, why couldn't Preston Foster tell the girl that he was married, but that he was filing for divorce under abandonment?

Overall, entertaining but not one I'll watch again.  Story just does not seem to be that tight.

Maybe Foster was one of those guys who still holds out hope, however unlikely that hope is. It does give the audience

something to wonder about for most of the picture--why did Judge humiliate and beat Foster to the extent he did.

The answer is fairly logical, if not all that believable. 

 

I occasionally put CC on if it's hard to hear an important piece of dialog. 

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6 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

No doubt,  but I was referring to the only "hotness" the librarians I'VE dealt with over the years was capable of.  The only sexy librarians I've ever seen were in movies.

Usually PORN.  ;) 

Sepiatone

Yeah, the type of librarian who wears her hair in a bun and glasses and then starts to get down. I'm talking about

a very small personal sample of course. There's more to check out at the library than books.

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On 1/13/2020 at 1:45 PM, Hibi said:

Yeah, Or the looks. Film had a few good sequences, but overall, not a film I'd watch again.

Strangely, I thought he actually looked better (and more like his father) as the Lipstick Killer in WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS, with the make-up.

I wonder if the real storyline behind Judge's over-the-top sadism was because the sister was pregnant and Preston wanted her to get an abortion.  

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I agree with anyone who felt JOHN DREW BARRYMORE was at best a pale shadow of his father.  THE BIG NIGHT was not so big. 

A couple of weeks ago I watched REPEAT PERFORMANCE (1947) on Noir Alley and it was better. 

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44 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Strangely, I thought he actually looked better (and more like his father) as the Lipstick Killer in WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS, with the make-up.

I wonder if the real storyline behind Judge's over-the-top sadism was because the sister was pregnant and Preston wanted her to get an abortion.  

Yeah, that could be.

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On 1/14/2020 at 2:45 PM, Allhallowsday said:

I agree with anyone who felt JOHN DREW BARRYMORE was at best a pale shadow of his father.  THE BIG NIGHT was not so big. 

A couple of weeks ago I watched REPEAT PERFORMANCE (1947) on Noir Alley and it was better. 

"Repeat Performance" was  good, and yes, I'd say it was a better film than "The Big Night".

However, I'm not sure what your point is. Noir Alley is a TCM program that's been around for several years now, normally it airs one noir film a week.   Of course over the weeks and months and years it's been showing, there's going to be a broad range of noir films, the quality is going to vary a lot, just as with any programming on TCM (or programming on any other station, for that matter.)

I'm assuming that those two films might be the only ones you've watched in the Noir Alley time slot. Believe me, Eddie Mueller features a wide selection of movies one could label as "noir", the two you mention are not necessarily a typical sample.

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24 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

"Repeat Performance" was  good, and yes, I'd say it was a better film than "The Big Night".

However, I'm not sure what your point is. Noir Alley is a TCM program that's been around for several years now, normally it airs one noir film a week.   Of course over the weeks and months and years it's been showing, there's going to be a broad range of noir films, the quality is going to vary a lot, just as with any programming on TCM (or programming on any other station, for that matter.)

I'm assuming that those two films might be the only ones you've watched in the Noir Alley time slot. Believe me, Eddie Mueller features a wide selection of movies one could label as "noir", the two you mention are not necessarily a typical sample.

No, I watch Noir Alley every Saturday, and sometimes Sunday noon.  Those were just the last two I watched.  I had not seen REPEAT PERFORMANCE before and decided to mention it. 

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