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2 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Lol. Brenda Marshall wasn't much of an actress.  She's very wooden in her films with Flynn.  And against Flynn's charisma, her woodenness is even more apparent.  If only Olivia de Havilland hadn't turned down The Sea Hawk, I think she would have been much better in the part. Marshall is a pretty face without much else.

For years, I only knew of Marshall as "Mrs. William Holden," I had no idea that she was actually an actress, or even what her first name was. Brenda Marshall isn't even her real name. Her real name is Ardis or something  like that. 

Brenda Marshall is surprisingly sexy and vivacious playing a "loose woman" in CAPTAINS OF THE CLOUDS, as opposed to her wooden performance in THE SEA HAWK.

marshall.jpg?w=387&h=292

 

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1 minute ago, speedracer5 said:

I did a Google Image Search for the second photo and it's also from The Killers

I saw a Google source that said the same thing about that photo.

Question: Does anyone remember that image in The Killers, because I don't?

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6 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I saw a Google source that said the same thing about that photo.

Question: Does anyone remember that image in The Killers, because I don't?

I don't either.  I last watched the film a few months ago during my Edmond O'Brien kick.  I should give that a re-watch at some point as well.

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11 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Brenda Marshall is surprisingly sexy and vivacious playing a "loose woman" in CAPTAINS OF THE CLOUDS, as opposed to her wooden performance in THE SEA HAWK.

marshall.jpg?w=387&h=292

 

I haven't seen this film. I'll have to look out for it on TCM's schedule.

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24 minutes ago, TomJH said:

You know your noirs, lavenderblue. I'm not certain about the second one or the last one either. That last one is a beautiful composition but I'm wondering if it might be a still pose, rather than actually coming from a film. Maybe someone here recognizes it, however.

ece6524367b91d031ae9af93a010ca57.jpg

And now I'VE done a Google Image Search for the last one above, and it seems it's from the little remember noir titled, I Was a Teenaged Gumshoe, starring Huntz Hall (minus the rest of the Bowery Boys), Edward Everett Horton AND a very young Thelma Ritter (pictured above) and before her unfortunately accident reduced her playing only character parts.

(...naaaah, just kiddin' of course...my guess would be just as you guessed here, Tom...that it's some sort of staged still shot taken in recent years as an homage to this film genre, and especially because the young lady there appears to be of more recent vintage, hair and clothing-wise)

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3 minutes ago, Dargo said:

ece6524367b91d031ae9af93a010ca57.jpg

And now I'VE done a Google Image Search for the last one above, and it seems it's from the little remember noir titled, I Was a Teenaged Gumshoe, starring Huntz Hall (minus the rest of the Bowery Boys), Edward Everett Horton AND a very young Thelma Ritter (pictured above) and before her unfortunately accident reduced her playing only character parts.

(...naaaah, just kiddin' of course...my guess would be just as you guessed here, Tom...that it's some sort of staged still shot taken in recent years as an homage to this film genre, and especially because the young lady there appears to be of more recent vintage, hair and clothing-wise)

Lol.

I tried doing a Google Image Search on this and all I got was "Noir Photography" and "Noir Femme Fatale" but it didn't actually say who the femme fatale was.  The matches I got made it seem like this was a stock image of a femme fatale.

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4 minutes ago, Dargo said:

ece6524367b91d031ae9af93a010ca57.jpg

And now I'VE done a Google Image Search for the last one above, and it seems it's from the little remember noir titled, I Was a Teenaged Gumshoe, starring Huntz Hall (minus the rest of the Bowery Boys), Edward Everett Horton AND a very young Thelma Ritter (pictured above) and before her unfortunately accident reduced her playing only character parts.

(...naaaah, just kiddin' of course...my guess would be just as you guessed here, Tom...that it's some sort of staged still shot taken in recent years, and especially because the young lady there appears to be of more recent vintage, hair and clothing-wise)

My guess was this was also a still shot,   and maybe it is from This Gun For Hire;  The guy on the right looks like a young Alan Ladd and the character he played in the film Raven.

Hey,  just a wild guess.

 

 

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Okay. I've solved the mystery of the first film still.

It's not from any film.  It's a photo that someone took of a woman acting the part of a femme fatale.  They used lighting and black and white to emulate the look of film noir.

https://www.prophotonut.com/2013/02/17/film-noir-a-hollywood-style-reborn/

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4 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

My guess was this was also a still shot,   and maybe it is from This Gun For Hire;  The guy on the right looks like a young Alan Ladd and the character he played in the film Raven.

Hey,  just a wild guess.

 

 

Yeah, I actually first thought of using a take on This Gun for Hire for my little joke up there James, as it also made me think of the Alan Ladd flick.

 

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35 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Brenda Marshall is surprisingly sexy and vivacious playing a "loose woman" in CAPTAINS OF THE CLOUDS, as opposed to her wooden performance in THE SEA HAWK.

marshall.jpg?w=387&h=292

 

Ya know Tom, sometimes I think you and I share the very same brain (no offense intended here ;) ), and 'cause after I read speedy's less than glowing review of Brenda Marshall's acting abilities, THIS very film came to my mind, also.

(...yep, I also remember thinking she was actually pretty good opposite Cagney and Dennis Morgan in this movie when I caught it a few years back on TCM)

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2 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Ya know Tom, sometimes I think you and I share the very same brain (no offense intended here ;) ), and 'cause after I read speedy's less than glowing review of Brenda Marshall's acting abilities, THIS very film came to my mind, also.

(...yep, I also remember thinking she was actually pretty good opposite Cagney and Dennis Morgan in this movie when I caught it a few years back on TCM)

Lol. I do like Cagney and Dennis Morgan. I'll definitely need to keep an eye out for this film.

Maybe Brenda saw her performance in The Sea Hawk and decided to spice things up a bit.  

Honestly, I don't think she's terrible, I just think she isn't anything special.  She's watchable, and I'll watch movies that she's in, but I don't think I'd watch a film specifically because she was in it. But I wouldn't avoid her in a film either. Heck, I won't even avoid a film because of Mickey Rooney, and I can't stand him. 

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29 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Okay. I've solved the mystery of the first film still.

It's not from any film.  It's a photo that someone took of a woman acting the part of a femme fatale.  They used lighting and black and white to emulate the look of film noir.

https://www.prophotonut.com/2013/02/17/film-noir-a-hollywood-style-reborn/

Thanks very much, Sherlock. Okay, that last shot wasn't from a film (which i suspected) but it's still a very nice homage to the genre.

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14 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Lol. I do like Cagney and Dennis Morgan. I'll definitely need to keep an eye out for this film.

Maybe Brenda saw her performance in The Sea Hawk and decided to spice things up a bit.  

Honestly, I don't think she's terrible, I just think she isn't anything special.  She's watchable, and I'll watch movies that she's in, but I don't think I'd watch a film specifically because she was in it. But I wouldn't avoid her in a film either. Heck, I won't even avoid a film because of Mickey Rooney, and I can't stand him. 

Captains of the Clouds comes on TCM quite often, and it's definitely worth watching, particularly the first half shot on location near North Bay, Ontario (I believe). Trout Lake, in fact, when it portrays Cagney and company as bush pilots. There must have been something about those Ontario locations and weather that helped to bring out the best in Brenda Marshall because it's difficult to believe she's the same actress you previously saw posing like a statue beside Flynn.

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So with that posed shot out of the way I guess that leaves ony this image to identify

Dxu9Po_WsAAaqxD.jpg

And this one does look like it comes from a film but I doubt very much it's The Killers, as Google indicates. Does anyone have any ideas? (And no, Dargo, I don't think that figure in the background is Thelma Ritter before she had that special operation).

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On 3/8/2020 at 12:26 PM, Dargo said:

Yep, as I watched it last night, the thought that another Bob with the last name of Mitchum could have made me believe in the Gagin character a little more.

I don't know what it is about Montgomery's portrayals of tough guys, but generally when he plays 'em  I never quite buy into the idea. It's like I can "see the strings" and notice his acting.

(...and as if his clipped style of speech always seems forced and unnatural for him)

You is absolutely right, Dargs, there's something self-consciously "hard" or "curt" in Robert Montgomery's performances in the noirs he was in  (which wasn't many, I think just the two he directed.)  

His acting style is the same in Lady in the Lake:  in both films, Montgomery plays a hard-boiled, cynical, tough kind of guy. I understand that the actor wants to get that "toughness" across; you know,  he's nobody's fool, he's not to be taken in by pretty women or hard-luck stories.  Also, I think Montgomery wants to convey the disillusionment and disappointment that veterans returning from the war  (as in WW 2 of course) would have been experiencing.  Especially in Ride the Pink Horse, where there's more than one allusion to his ex-soldier status, his character is embittered and suspicious.  He and his buddies fought hard in the war, and what do they get when they return home to America?  Nothin'.  No jobs, no recognition, no future.    

Of course this is one of the classic tropes of noir  (that is, late '40s noir).  And it appears in many noirs from that period  -- the alienation and disillusionment of veterans. But having said all that, to me, Montgomery's depiction of both Marlowe in Lady in the Lake  (ok, I'm not sure Phillip Marlowe was ever a war vet)  and especially Gagin in Ride the Pink Horse does not strike me as an embittered cynical ex-soldier so much as just a guy who has no manners.

He's unbelievably bad-tempered and rude in both these films.  Look at how nasty and even insulting he is to everyone in Ride the Pink Horse  (except to maybe Pancho).   Especially poor Pila;  I think one flaw in the story is, we don't really get a reason why Pila is so dedicated to helping out this guy she doesn't even know.  I really hope it isn't that she thinks she's in love with him, since she's about 17  ( and looks even younger) and he's got to be all of 30, probably older.  At least Gagin never puts the moves on her, that's good.

But he's incredibly rude and disrespectful to her, constantly criticizing her appearance and snapping  at her. Yet it is Pila who saves Gagin's life and who unconditionally helps him in every sketchy situation he finds himself in.  Ok, Pancho too.  But Pila is almost, as someone  (sorry, I forget who) suggested here, is almost like his guardian angel.  The only clue we get as to the reason why she helps him so much is, she may be psychic.  She stares at him in alarm when she first sees him, and later we find out that when this happened (her first sight of him), she saw him as a dead man.  Perhaps she has the sixth sense.  

...and why Gagin keeps criticizing her appearance is almost bizarre, as she is undeniably and exceptionally beautiful.

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5 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Great point.  This was kind of a disconnect for me but after the movie was over I thought that perhaps she was "putting it on" for her peers so they'd continue to just think of her as that regular kid, when in reality she was always a mystical, set-apart person who had to hide that "specialness".   Loved Wanda's performance.

There was also the small town girl visiting a big city, okay a bigger village, in the mix too. That comes out in the

ending where she has gone back to her ponytails and has something to brag on that she didn't have before, I guess

it's a bit disappointing that she isn't just a mystic figure. Either way, I agree that Wanda Hendrix was very convincing

in this role.

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10 minutes ago, TomJH said:

So with that posed shot out of the way I guess that leaves ony this image to identify

Dxu9Po_WsAAaqxD.jpg

And this one does look like it comes from a film but I doubt very much it's The Killers, as Google indicates. Does anyone have any ideas? (And no, Dargo, I don't think that figure in the background is Thelma Ritter before she had that special operation).

Well then, I guess there goes my "same brain" theory here then, huh Tom!

(...and besides, there of course would be NO way I'd ever spell certain words with that oh so needless and unnecessary superfluous-u, ya know)

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On 3/8/2020 at 10:14 PM, Vautrin said:

 

...Montgomery is rather dismissive of the locals. Can you be an ugly American without leaving the

U.S. ?

What ? I thought he did leave the U.S.   Oh, silly me...was Ride the Pink Horse set in an American border town?? For some reason I thought it was set in a Mexican town.

Either way, Gagin is offensively dismissive, as you say, to the local Mexican Indian population.  His lack of respect for them is basically the kind of casual, unconscious racism so many white Americans seemed to possess at that time.

Also sexist.  Although he does express gratitude to Pancho, I don't remember his doing the same, except maybe at the very end, to Pila.

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On 3/9/2020 at 11:28 AM, Hibi said:

 

.... What was that stuff with the gum supposed to mean? I didn't get that.

 

They made a big deal out of Gagin buying a stick of gum and chewing it for a minute or so because he had decided to hide the locker key (the locker where he's put  the incriminating cheque ) behind a wall map in the bus station.  He attached the key to the chewed up gum and then stuck 'em both behind that map.  I think it's laffite who says that's not a very good hiding place, but you know that expression, "hiding in plain sight".  Maybe Gagin thought he'd come up with an ingeniously clever hiding place for that key. Anyway, that was the reason for the gum thing.

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

What ? I thought he did leave the U.S.   Oh, silly me...was Ride the Pink Horse set in an American border town?? For some reason I thought it was set in a Mexican town.

Either way, Gagin is offensively dismissive, as you say, to the local Mexican Indian population.  His lack of respect for them is basically the kind of casual, unconscious racism so many white Americans seemed to possess at that time.

Also sexist.  Although he does express gratitude to Pancho, I don't remember his doing the same, except maybe at the very end, to Pila.

Ya know MissW, and while I might be confusing this with another film somehow (and which is possible), but I seem to recall some info regarding this very thing  and which I don't recall Eddie mentioning in either his intro or out-tro this time, nor one I can now find in the IMDb trivia section for this film for that matter. But, I remember either hearing or reading the reason the name of the fictional town of San Pablo being substituted for the city of Santa Fe NM, was that the city fathers of Santa Fe at the time insisted upon this and due to the seedy and violent storyline of the film.

I only remember Eddie mentioning the famous La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe being referenced within it and thus placing its setting there in a vague manner, but not Eddie mentioning anything about the whole "city fathers" things this time.

(...and as you might know, Santa Fe isn't actually a border town, as it's located in the more northern part of that state, but its local culture is still quite heavily influenced by both the Mexican and Native American cultures)

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Lol. Brenda Marshall wasn't much of an actress.  She's very wooden in her films with Flynn.  And against Flynn's charisma, her woodenness is even more apparent.  If only Olivia de Havilland hadn't turned down The Sea Hawk, I think she would have been much better in the part. Marshall is a pretty face without much else.

For years, I only knew of Marshall as "Mrs. William Holden," I had no idea that she was actually an actress, or even what her first name was. Brenda Marshall isn't even her real name. Her real name is Ardis or something  like that. 

It's interesting -- I always thought that Brenda Marshall resembled Audrey Hepburn.

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18 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Ya know MissW, and while I might be confusing this with another film somehow, but I seem to recall some info regarding this very thing  and which I don't recall Eddie mentioning in either his intro or out-tro this time, nor one I can now find in the IMDb trivia section for this film for that matter. But, I remember either hearing or reading the reason the name of the fictional town of San Pablo was substituted for the city of Santa Fe NM, was that the city fathers of Santa Fe at the time insisted upon this and due to the seedy storyline of the film.

I only remember Eddie mentioning the famous La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe being referenced within it and thus placing its setting there in a vague manner, but not Eddie mentioning anything about the whole "city fathers" things this time.

(...and as you might know, Santa Fe isn't actually a border town, as it's located in the more northern part of that state, but its culture is still quite heavily influenced by both the Mexican and Native American cultures)

Actually, Dargo, I did not know where Sante Fe is, or even if it's an American or a Mexican town  (or at least I didn't know before I read your post.)  My knowledge of certain areas of American geography are sketchy, I'm afraid.  But then, I bet you wouldn't be able to tell me where Omemee is, either,   right?

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2 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

It's interesting -- I always thought that Brenda Marshall resembled Audrey Hepburn.

So in THIS case, NOT Lola Bunny, Bugs' girlfriend then, eh Bronxie?!

Well, that's good! I was startin' to worry about you here.

(...ya know, I've heard that dreaded disease "Rabbititus" and where people start seein' rabbits everywhere, can be as contagious and insidious as this Corona thing that's goin' around right now!) ;)

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