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Noir Alley

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7 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Aargh !  I'm sorry, I can't help it,  I get so annoyed with some of you who keep declaring that you don't like foreign language films.  Or don't like watching foreign language films.      

 I'm not sure if you people have a problem with just following the film  (yes, I get it, if you're reading the subtitles you can't be paying attention to facial expressions and other things going on on the screen, I understand that concern), maybe that's it.  You would find that you'd kind of get used to it, if you watched a lot of movies with sub-titles you'd just gradually be better able to read the sub-titles and still see what's going on.  Practice.  But I can't help suspecting that it's more than that, it's not just the extra work of reading the sub-titles and keeping up with the visuals on the screen at the same time,  it's that a lot of you just don't like "furren movies".  Maybe I'm being unfair and judgemental. 

But honestly,  get over it.  Yes, who doesn't love American noir, it's great, we all love those American cities and the snappy American dialogue and seeing all the aspects of post-war American culture, etc.   But you're depriving yourselves of so many fantastic movies if you avoid  those made in a language other than English.  I know that those who don't like foreign-language movies only watched "Elevator to the Gallows" because that was the feature on Noir Alley this week.    It was a great film, so much so that I'm saving my comments for it for another post.

Do yourselves a favour.   Get over that "only American English-language movies are what I want to watch" thing.  

OK. You're right. I guess I do have to get out of my "comfort zone". Also, as my hearing deteriorates; sub-titles are helping. I actually find following the dialog on many of the foreign films on Netflix (even British) more difficult.  Hard to admit for or a guy who claims he likes women with British accents. 

Also, I forgot to comment on the film's score. Miles Davis is a jazz icon. 

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I liked the smooth way Malone "called out" Eddie for neglecting to include Agnes Varda as not only part of the French New Wave but pointing out that she actually anticipated that movement with her 1955 LA POINTE COURTE.  He was rattling off the usual male names when she nicely interrupted to "remind" him.   Way to go, Alicia!

I think she should be Muller's permanent partner, to maybe tone down a bit of his arrogance since he didn't even respond when she mentioned Varda.

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Btw...

While watching this film last night, was I the only one here who started wondering what a Miles Davis version of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" might've sounded like???

(...probably am, huh) 

;)

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As far as "Elevator to the Gallows" is concerned, I thought it was a cool movie.  I enjoyed the cockeyed romanticism in Veronique about how she and her boyfriend were destined to be tragic lovers and giving one the impression that authors and song writers would tout their affair after they were dead.   It was brought up in the final wrap by Alicia Malone that while the Jeanne Moreau and Maurice Ronet characters were the plotting lovers, they never were shown together except at the end of the film and only then it was in still photographs of the two of them sharing intimate moments.

Since I got Roku back in December, I have watched several foreign language films, along with lesser-known American pictures that I never remember seeing trailers from even though the movies are only 10 to 15 years old.  I signed up for Hulu late last month, and they have a nice collection of foreign language films.  I've watched movies that were made in Germany, Mexico, Argentina, Kosovo, Italy, France, Spain, Russia, Denmark, Iran, and China.  For those who say they can't get into foreign films because they find the subtitles too distracting, I would encourage them to give these films another chance.  Like CigarJoe said previously, re-watch a film if you find it too distracting to follow at first glance.  If you're like me, you'll come around to enjoying these kinds of pictures who explore themes and storylines that most people on these message boards would be familiar with.

Side-note:  One thing that is annoying about subtitled films is when the words cannot be seen due to a film being in bad need of restoration, or the white letters showing up on a white background in a black and white picture.  I have seen some black and white movies with yellow subtitles, and that makes viewing and following the action much more enjoyable and easy to watch.

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34 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Do yourselves a favour.   Get over that "only American English-language movies are what I want to watch" thing.  

It would also give us more variety instead of the same ol same ol films presented in various ways to make their monotony seen fresh.

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26 minutes ago, midwestan said:

   It was brought up in the final wrap by Alicia Malone that while the Jeanne Moreau and Maurice Ronet characters were the plotting lovers, they never were shown together except at the end of the film and only then it was in still photographs of the two of them sharing intimate moments.

 

I'm glad you mentioned this, midwestan.   This really makes me believe that Alicia would be great paired with Muller.   Seems she has more insight and knowledge about film in general than "Czar of Noir" Eddie.  In my opinion he is letting this title go to his head, lol.  Don't get me wrong -- I enjoy him in this format, but I'd love to see Malone along for the ride, so to speak.  

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The best part of this series (for me) is the way Eddie throws out the facts, one after the other.

I think the natural dynamic between 2 people will destroy this, so I think it best to keep Eddie solo.

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13 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I'm glad you mentioned this, midwestan.   This really makes me believe that Alicia would be great paired with Muller.   Seems she has more insight and knowledge about film in general than "Czar of Noir" Eddie.  In my opinion he is letting this title go to his head, lol.  Don't get me wrong -- I enjoy him in this format, but I'd love to see Malone along for the ride, so to speak.  

 

6 minutes ago, omm said:

The best part of this series (for me) is the way Eddie throws out the facts, one after the other.

I think the natural dynamic between 2 people will destroy this, so I think it best to keep Eddie solo.

I don't know about whether or not 'Noir Alley' needs two presenters like 'Essentials' or some other special series with a guest programmer.  I think both Bronxgirl48 and omm make good points about what they would like or dislike about potential changes to the way 'Noir Alley' is shown.   Alicia was a nice change of pace, but I don't know if she or anyone else should be joining Eddie each week on a regular basis.  While she made a good point about the lack of physical contact between the male and female leads, I'd like to think one of our astute posters would have brought that up too.  Of course, the way some our posters' minds think (present company included), it may not have been until Monday or Tuesday!  😜

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On 3/16/2020 at 10:25 AM, Det Jim McLeod said:

I always thought both Mature and Wilde were much more talented than people gave them credit for. 

Wilde was very good and likable as the patient husband of klutzy June Allyson in Woman's World (1954). He did an excellent job as the honest cop with a soft spot for the ladies in The Big Combo (1955). His biggest artistic triumphs were in the 1960s where he became a great director as well. He did an outstanding job with the brutal and bloody adventure film The Naked Prey (1966) and the surprisingly tough war drama Beach Red (1967). He also gave two of his best performances in these as well. 

Wilde was also very good as Gene Tierney's husband in the Technicolor noir 1945's Leave Her to Heaven.  Of course, one of his most popular roles was as the Great Sebastian in 1952's The Greatest Show on Earth.  He received his only Oscar nod playing Chopin in 1945's A Song to Remember.

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I liked the smooth way Malone "called out" Eddie for neglecting to include Agnes Varda as not only part of the French New Wave but pointing out that she actually anticipated that movement with her 1955 LA POINTE COURTE.  He was rattling off the usual male names when she nicely interrupted to "remind" him.   Way to go, Alicia!

I think she should be Muller's permanent partner, to maybe tone down a bit of his arrogance since he didn't even respond when she mentioned Varda.

I'm sorry I missed seeing this. I like Eddie but sometimes he seems a little **** sure of himself. The fact that he didn't acknowledge Alicia's comment may reflect a guy not used to being reminded of omissions.

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Btw...

While watching this film last night, was I the only one here who started wondering what a Miles Davis version of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" might've sounded like???

(...probably am, huh) 

;)

HEY! Just thought of somethin' here regarding this.

Now that I think about it, Louis Malle DID incorporate the song "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" in his movie here, but not any version that Miles Davis did in it.

Uh-huh. SURE! It was during the scene where the police drive up to that cafe to pick up the Tavernier character while he's sittin' there!

What?! Haven't you guys ever realized that French police car sirens sound just like they're playin' the  "SOMEday I'LL wish UPon A star, AND wake UP  where THE clouds ARE far BEHIND me" second verse of this song?

(...well, if ya haven't, then I guess this joke won't go over very well, huh)

;)

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38 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I'm glad you mentioned this, midwestan.   This really makes me believe that Alicia would be great paired with Muller.   Seems she has more insight and knowledge about film in general than "Czar of Noir" Eddie.  In my opinion he is letting this title go to his head, lol.  Don't get me wrong -- I enjoy him in this format, but I'd love to see Malone along for the ride, so to speak.  

 

31 minutes ago, omm said:

The best part of this series (for me) is the way Eddie throws out the facts, one after the other.

I think the natural dynamic between 2 people will destroy this, so I think it best to keep Eddie solo.

Interesting.  I'm not  sure what I think about these two different views.  On the one hand, I kind of like the idea of a bit of a dialogue, a conversation, between two noir afficionados;  as Bronxgirl said, it could add something different to the usual intros and outros of Noir Alley, a fresh perspective.

On the other hand, I do really like Eddie Muller and the way he's been doing his Noir Alley "wraparounds" all along.    However,  the  one thing I find kind of frustrating is that he tends to talk more around whatever film we've just seen, rather than about it.  For instance, he'll give us a lot of information about how the film got produced in the first place, or how the original novel it's based on is different from the movie, or what happened to one of the actors after they made that film (whichever film he's talking about.)  ...He gives us a lot of extraneous information, but almost never says much about the film itself ,  that is, the story, the characters, etc.  This is my favourite thing about movies -- not just noir--all the different aspects of a film to appreciate and think about, why this or that character betrayed another character, or how a heist went wrong because of one unpredictable circumstance,  or how ironicly some part of the narrative played out, things like that.

Those things are much more interesting to me than who the producer knew to help him make the movie, how the cast all got along, or who became an alcoholic in later years.

But then again, it's not just Eddie who does that  (talks around the film rather than about the film. )  They all do it, Ben, Dave, Alicia...Alicia and Eddie did not discuss Elevator to the Gallows  in any depth after its screening  (ok,  Alicia mentioned that interesting thing about how the lovers are never actually seen together except in the photographs, but that was all...)    Instead they seemed more concerned with discussing the French Nouvelle Vague movement and who was and wasn't a part of it, etc.

Yet there was so much to say about the movie !   I don't really care that much when Eddie " throws out the facts, one after the other".  I'd love for the hosts to talk more about the films they show the way an English instructor talks about a novel.    I wish all the TCM hosts would talk more directly about whatever movies they've just aired, instead of all the stuff about the history of how much work went into producing it, or which actor had an affair with which leading lady,  or who served the sandwiches on set , and what kind they were...

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On 3/14/2020 at 5:08 PM, mr6666 said:

:huh:

Do you have Eddie's intro and exit comments about I Wake Up Screaming available?  I'd love to hear what he had to say.

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7 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

Do you have Eddie's intro and exit comments about I Wake Up Screaming available?  I'd love to hear what he had to say.

Comments when he introduced it at Noir City 2016 start at 8 minute mark.

 

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35 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I'm sorry I missed seeing this. I like Eddie but sometimes he seems a little **** sure of himself. The fact that he didn't acknowledge Alicia's comment may reflect a guy not used to being reminded of omissions.

Yeah, maybe. But I think it could've ALSO been the idea that whenever Eddie gets on theTCM noir set, he seems to kind'a transport himself back to those bygone days of film noir's heyday.

And so, back when men seldom acknowledged the knowledgeable input they'd receive from women!

(...yeah yeah I know, ladies...so what's really changed in the meantime, RIGHT?!) ;)

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1 hour ago, midwestan said:

 

  While she made a good point about the lack of physical contact between the male and female leads, I'd like to think one of our astute posters would have brought that up too.  Of course, the way some our posters' minds think (present company included), it may not have been until Monday or Tuesday!  😜

lol, I just perused ELEVATOR on Movie Chat, and that point was brought up initially by a poster fourteen years ago.

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3 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Aargh !  I'm sorry, I can't help it,  I get so annoyed with some of you who keep declaring that you don't like foreign language films.  Or don't like watching foreign language films.      

  Maybe I'm being unfair and judgemental. 

But honestly,  get over it.  

"Get over" my not liking movies in a foreign language and you are "being unfair and judgmental."

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I prefer to have Eddie do Noir Alley alone as it seems that he is talking to me.   He is educating me rather than  being involved in a discussion with another movie "expert."    That may work for The Essentials and other formats, but I think the solo presenter works better for NA.

As for the "revelation" that the two stars were never actually together during the movie, I think all of us know that.  Not sure what the significance of it was either.  Did Malone ever say why that was important?  One thing that aroused my curiosity was who shot the pictures of the two together?  Of course, obviously it was not a very secret affair as many people in the movie knew about it.

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17 minutes ago, TheCid said:

"Get over" my not liking movies in a foreign language and you are "being unfair and judgmental."

Forget it, Cid, it's Noir Alley.

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5 minutes ago, TheCid said:

Did Malone ever say why that was important? 

It's not important so much as daring.  It wasn't done. Also the  two parallel storylines running at the same time was probably innovative for 1958. 

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7 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Forget it, Cid, it's Noir Alley.

Yeah, couldn't resist replying to Miss Wonderly's  post though.

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14 minutes ago, TheCid said:

Yeah, couldn't resist replying to Miss Wonderly's  post though.

tumblr_owa3cmlS5W1upwnswo1_500.gifv

"See that, Wonderly, now you're driving another guy nuts. By the way, what's happening to your face?"

"Mine, Sam? Take a look at your own!"

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4 minutes ago, TomJH said:

tumblr_owa3cmlS5W1upwnswo1_500.gifv

"See that, Wonderly, now you're driving another guy nuts. By the way, what's happening to your face?"

"Mine, Sam? Take a look at your own!"

I understand this is how Evelyn Wood used to watch movies.

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2 hours ago, TheCid said:

"Get over" my not liking movies in a foreign language and you are "being unfair and judgmental."

Please re-read my entire post that you're quoting from, and you'll see that a big part of what I'm saying is, if you could "get over" your dislike of non-English movies, you'd be rewarded with a whole new batch of great films to watch that you'd probably like.

I think I was careful to not be nasty or snobbish about it.  I'm just saying that it doesn't make sense to avoid foreign films just because they're not in English.  (Although, come to think of it, I think a lot of posters on these boards have very little interest in British movies also.)

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This wasn't my first elevator ride. I've always thought the secondary plot about the young punks not on

dope was kind of cliched and unoriginal, though it helps in the overall plot to put Ronet on the spot for

the murders he didn't commit. If only he had not forgotten to get the rope and grappling hook back.

At first it seemed such a dumb move I thought maybe he did it on purpose for some reason. But no ,it

was just a stupid mistake that, like many stupid mistakes, starts the whole plot going. Breathless had a

certain self-parody, nod and wink aspect to it, like Belmondo looking at a Bogart poster and taking a

drag on his cig, saying Bogie. You can't imagine Ronet doing that, he plays it totally straight with no

irony. I noticed that in the intro there were two glasses about half full. At the outro they are still about

half full. Poseurs. 

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