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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

I understand this is how Evelyn Wood used to watch movies.

It's also how Evelyn Waugh composed his novels.

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Continuing  with International Noir I've watched three more between Elevator to the Gallows and 7:00 AM this morning.

Salon Mexico (1949) Directed by Emilio Fernández, written by Emilio Fernández and  Mauricio Magdaleno.

Salón México Poster

You all know Emilio Fernández this guy below,

Emilio Fernández Picture

He was in The Night of the Iguana, The AppaloosaReturn of the SevenThe War WagonThe Wild BunchPat Garrett & Billy the KidBring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

Mercedes (Marga Lopez) is a hooker working out of a dance hall  the Salon Mexico, a famous ballroom/club in Mexico City. She lives in a Mexico City  tenement. Most of her money goes to her younger sister Beatriz (Derbez) who is enrolled  in a private school.  Beatriz doesn't know her sister is a ****.  Everything unravels when Mercedes wins a dance contest with Paco her pimp and he doesn't want to giver her share so she steals it from him while he's sleeping with another **** in his stable. Also in the mix is a friendly policeman who's had a crush on Mercedes ever since his wife died.

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Death of a Cyclist (1955) Director: Juan Antonio Bardem.

Death of a Cyclist Poster

Juan a professor and María José a socialite, are lovers. Maria is married to wealth, bored but attached to her comforts. Driving back from a weekend tryst Maria kills cyclist on a side road. They leave the man to die because they fear scandal.  Rafa, an eccentric social gadfly who hints that he knows something, and he threatens to expose them to María José's husband, Miguel.  Things don't quite work out the way Juan and Maria plan.

Image result for death of a cyclist film

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Pale Flower (1964) Directed stylistically by Masahiro Shinoda

Pale Flower Poster

Excon Maraki, a yakuza, returns to his old haunts in Tokyo. He resumes his place within the Funada gang.  He is a gambler and returns to the illegal card games he loves, there he meets the much younger Saeko a well dressed, beautiful young woman with lots of cash and a gambling addiction who is bored with life. When Saeko tells him she tried heroin he tells her there is a bigger high and asks if she wants to watch him carry out another Yakuza hit. 

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Image result for Pale flower

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15 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Please re-read my entire post that you're quoting from, and you'll see that a big part of what I'm saying is, if you could "get over" your dislike of non-English movies, you'd be rewarded with a whole new batch of great films to watch that you'd probably like.

I think I was careful to not be nasty or snobbish about it.  I'm just saying that it doesn't make sense to avoid foreign films just because they're not in English.  (Although, come to think of it, I think a lot of posters on these boards have very little interest in British movies also.)

I wasn't bothered by your post. You were simply pointing out that those of us who love this genre of movies are cheating ourselves if we ignore foreign films.  

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16 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Please re-read my entire post that you're quoting from, and you'll see that a big part of what I'm saying is, if you could "get over" your dislike of non-English movies, you'd be rewarded with a whole new batch of great films to watch that you'd probably like.

I think I was careful to not be nasty or snobbish about it.  I'm just saying that it doesn't make sense to avoid foreign films just because they're not in English.  (Although, come to think of it, I think a lot of posters on these boards have very little interest in British movies also.)

I don't dislike foreign movies, just those in a foreign language that requires subtitles.  While you may not have intended your post to "be nasty or snobbish," it certainly came across that way to me.

And I did read and re-read your entire post carefully.

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1 hour ago, TheCid said:

I don't dislike foreign movies, just those in a foreign language that requires subtitles.

You must not like silent movies either then?

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On 3/22/2020 at 1:08 PM, misswonderly3 said:

Aargh !  I'm sorry, I can't help it,  I get so annoyed with some of you who keep declaring that you don't like foreign language films.  Or don't like watching foreign language films.      

 I'm not sure if you people have a problem with just following the film  (yes, I get it, if you're reading the subtitles you can't be paying attention to facial expressions and other things going on on the screen, I understand that concern), maybe that's it.  You would find that you'd kind of get used to it, if you watched a lot of movies with sub-titles you'd just gradually be better able to read the sub-titles and still see what's going on.  Practice.  But I can't help suspecting that it's more than that, it's not just the extra work of reading the sub-titles and keeping up with the visuals on the screen at the same time,  it's that a lot of you just don't like "furren movies".  Maybe I'm being unfair and judgemental. 

But honestly,  get over it.  Yes, who doesn't love American noir, it's great, we all love those American cities and the snappy American dialogue and seeing all the aspects of post-war American culture, etc.   But you're depriving yourselves of so many fantastic movies if you avoid  those made in a language other than English.  I know that those who don't like foreign-language movies only watched "Elevator to the Gallows" because that was the feature on Noir Alley this week.    It was a great film, so much so that I'm saving my comments for it for another post.

Do yourselves a favour.   Get over that "only American English-language movies are what I want to watch" thing.  

 

3 hours ago, TheCid said:

I don't dislike foreign movies, just those in a foreign language that requires subtitles.  While you may not have intended your post to "be nasty or snobbish," it certainly came across that way to me.

And I did read and re-read your entire post carefully.

Ok, but I actually think it's you who's being a little unfair, since you quoted just the "judgemental" sounding bits from my post about foreign films, and left out all the other things I said , which, instead of repeating here, I have bolded above.  Things such as  I absolutely understand why someone might not enjoy watching a foreign language movie because it's distracting to try and read the sub-titles and still see what's happening on the screen at the same time,which I said I have experienced myself and understand.  But I also said you kind of get used to it after a while, and it becomes a little easier to do. 

That's why I made a distinction between disliking foreign films in and of themselves,   and disliking trying to deal with watching the film and keeping up with the dialogue as well.  

I take back that admittedly snobbish-sounding comment about  "maybe some of you just don't like "furren" movies".  I shouldn't have said that.

Come on, Cid, let's stop fighting. 🙂

 

 

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Nix the Eddie and Alicia foreign language blabberthon. The longer they talk the later I have to go to

bed. I liked Death of a Cyclist, though it's not quite as good as Death of a Disco Dancer. As soon

as Maria got into the car at the end of the film you were pretty sure that Jose was not long for this

world. And then when she was speeding during the rainstorm, what were the odds she wouldn't

get into a crash and die? Near zero. Whenever I see a femme fatale get into a car near the finale of

the movie death is usually not far behind. That she crashed due to the actions of the cyclist was kind

of cool, as she had killed a bicyclist at the start of the film. Taking into account the practicalities, since

killing the cyclist was an accident, I doubt the prison time would have been too severe. I don't think

Rafa was that creepy. He just liked to taunt them and make some quick money into the bargain. Third

degree creep.

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18 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I don't think

Rafa was that creepy. He just liked to taunt them and make some quick money into the bargain. Third

degree creep.

He reminded me more of Dan Duryea than Peter Lorre.

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

He reminded me more of Dan Duryea than Peter Lorre.

Yes, physically he doesn't remind one of Lorre. Both Lorre and Duryea could do that I know something

about you and you're going to have to pay, Duryea more forcefully. Rafa was more sophisticated and

light-hearted in going about his game. 

 

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1 minute ago, Vautrin said:

Yes, physically he doesn't remind one of Lorre. Both Lorre and Duryea could do that I know something

about you and you're going to have to pay, Duryea more forcefully. Rafa was more sophisticated and

light-hearted in going about his game. 

 

Come to think of it he also looks a lot like Dort Clark

wH7d34L.jpg

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1 hour ago, Hoganman1 said:

I'm looking forward to CRIME WAVE next weekend. I haven't seen that one. 

You're gonna like it, Hogan.

Some things you'll notice are all the great shots of mid-century L.A., the fast-paced direction, the fine performances by the entire cast...oh, and of course those terrific cheekbones of Phyllis Kirk's. ;)

(...and if you're like me, you'll probably also begin wondering while you're watching it why song and dance man Gene Nelson was never able to change his image and become better identified with noir films and like Dick Powell and John Payne were able to do, and because Nelson is pretty good in this one)

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

You're gonna like it, Hogan.

Some things you'll notice are all the great shots of mid-century L.A., the fast-paced direction, the fine performances by the entire cast...oh, and of course those terrific cheekbones of Phyllis Kirk's. ;)

(...and if you're like me, you'll probably also begin wondering while you're watching it why song and dance man Gene Nelson was never able to change his image and become better identified with noir films and like Dick Powell and John Payne were able to do, and because Nelson is pretty good in this one)

John Alton's great noir cinematography is yet another plus for Crime Wave. You also get to see Timothy Carey play one of those small crazy roles he acts so well . . . or is he acting?? I don't want to oversell Crime Wave, but if you like noir, this is one to check out.

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Gene Nelson was never able to change his image and become better identified with noir films and like Dick Powell and John Payne were able to do, and because Nelson is pretty good in this one)

He's in another Transitional Noir that's pretty good called 20,000 Eyes (1961) starring with Merry Anders, Paul Maxey (The Narrow Margin) and John Banner (Sergeant Schultz  from Hogan's Heroes) as the bad guy.

20,000 Eyes Poster

He zooms around L.A, in one of these it looks like a little jet plane

20000-eyes%2B16.jpg

1961 Chrysler New Yorker convertible

20000-eyes%2B15.jpg

Merry Anders & Gene Nelson

20000-eyes%2B33.jpg

20000-eyes%2B60.jpg

Paule Maxey

20000-eyes%2B12.jpg

John Banner

20000-eyes%2B72.jpg

 

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7 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Come to think of it he also looks a lot like Dort Clark

wH7d34L.jpg

There is a resemblance, though the actor who played Rafa had sharper features and a rather

unusual angular dimension to his face. He reminds me a bit of someone one might see in a

Fellini film.

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On 3/22/2020 at 12:04 PM, TheCid said:

 

Been a while, but I did spend a week in Australia and have had discussions with Australians since then.  Add in all the movies and TV shows with Australians playing Australians.  No one ever sounded remotely like Malone.  Her accent is becoming annoying.  Is it unique to a certain place in Australia or maybe her?

I kept silent about this,but it is annoying me also,many months ago i read somewhere she was taking lessons to lose her accent..  obviously it is not working...

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I was in Melbourne in the 80's and my impression was most Australian accents were indistinguishable from British accents. When I traveled -especially to Sydney- I found the accents stronger with harder tones like Alecia Malone's. I found notable accent variations especially in rural areas.

Most of noir discussions mention "the City" locations. Are there any notable "rural" noirs or is urban setting part of what makes it noir? 

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Are there any notable "rural" noirs or is urban setting part of what makes it noir? 

Border Incident, Highway Dragnet, The Scarf, most of Detour, Ace In The Hole, Cry Vengeance, The Hitch-Hiker, House By The River, Jeopardy, Key Largo, Moonrise, the last half of On Dangerous Ground, parts of Out of The Past, The Red HouseStorm Fear, The Girl In Black StockingsWoman On The Beach. Depending on what you consider rural add Ride The Pink Horse, Road House and Suddenly. Probably a few more like Beyond The Forest.

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 

Most of noir discussions mention "the City" locations. Are there any notable "rural" noirs or is urban setting part of what makes it noir? 

Well, based on this---

  1. Film noir (/ n w ɑːr /; French: ) is a cinematic term used primarily to describe stylish Hollywood crime dramas, particularly those that emphasize cynical attitudes and sexual motivations. The 1940s and 1950s are generally regarded as the "classic period" of American film noir.

    I don't see any specific reference to urban settings being a requirement. 

    Sepiatone

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6 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Well, based on this---

  1. Film noir (/ n w ɑːr /; French: ) is a cinematic term used primarily to describe stylish Hollywood crime dramas, particularly those that emphasize cynical attitudes and sexual motivations. The 1940s and 1950s are generally regarded as the "classic period" of American film noir.

    I don't see any specific reference to urban settings being a requirement. 

    Sepiatone

 

But technically you could actually stretch beyond that "classic period" all the way to 1967-68. 

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Yep, there are actually quite a few noirs that are set in a rural environment.

(...and the first one which came to my mind here for some reason was 1949's Border Incident starring Ricardo Montalban)

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Just now, cigarjoe said:

 

But technically you could actually stretch beyond that "classic period" all the way to 1967-68. 

But, as the query was about "settings" and not the "classic period", I saw no need to address it.

Sepiatone

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