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1 minute ago, Sepiatone said:

But, as the query was about "settings" and not the "classic period", I saw no need to address it.

Sepiatone

More of a heads up for TikiSoo 

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15 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

He's in another Transitional Noir that's pretty good called 20,000 Eyes (1961) starring with Merry Anders, Paul Maxey (The Narrow Margin) and John Banner (Sergeant Schultz  from Hogan's Heroes) as the bad guy.

20,000 Eyes Poster

He zooms around L.A, in one of these it looks like a little jet plane

20000-eyes%2B16.jpg

1961 Chrysler New Yorker convertible

20000-eyes%2B15.jpg

Merry Anders & Gene Nelson

Merry Anders is another of my favorites.  First became acquainted with her when Raiders from Beneath the Sea was shown on TV.  Not a very good movie, but she had a good role in it.

She was later featured in many second series Dragnet shows  Jack Webb made her wear a black wig because he did not think people would believe a blonde who looked that good would be a police officer.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

Border Incident, Highway Dragnet, The Scarf, most of Detour, Ace In The Hole, Cry Vengeance, The Hitch-Hiker, House By The River, Jeopardy, Key Largo, Moonrise, the last half of On Dangerous Ground, parts of Out of The Past, The Red HouseStorm Fear, The Girl In Black StockingsWoman On The Beach. Depending on what you consider rural add Ride The Pink Horse, Road House and Suddenly. Probably a few more like Beyond The Forest.

Great list Joe. maybe add Touch of Evil and Beware My Lovely  and  Nightfall.  Nightfall,  although some of it takes place in the city, quite a bit of the film is  also is set in a rural setting, I think Wyoming

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Nightfall is a fine Columbia noir film with Ado Ray,   Brian Keith and Anne Brancroft;   Yea,  lot of nice outdoor scenes with flashbacks to winter and the current setting of end-of-winter \ start of spring.      The film ends with a great outdoor scene with a snowplow.

image.jpeg.98bf9cb1a8687def2486ac2e4a4f97d1.jpeg

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Border Incident, Highway Dragnet, The Scarf, most of Detour, Ace In The Hole, Cry Vengeance, The Hitch-Hiker, House By The River, Jeopardy, Key Largo, Moonrise, the last half of On Dangerous Ground, parts of Out of The Past, The Red HouseStorm Fear, The Girl In Black StockingsWoman On The Beach. Depending on what you consider rural add Ride The Pink Horse, Road House and Suddenly. Probably a few more like Beyond The Forest.

i WOULD TENTATIVELY (oops, caps lock) add the 1934 film TWO ALONE, which I saw on TCM many moons ago but which made a strong impression on me to your list. it borders very much on being an EARLY "agrinoir." (again though, it has been a while since i saw it, so if i saw it again, i can't say whether i'd agree with myself (maybe i was high)- but it reminded me a lot of JIM THOMPSON'S WRITINGS.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0025923/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

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7 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Nightfall is a fine Columbia noir film with Ado Ray,   Brian Keith and Anne Brancroft;   Yea,  lot of nice outdoor scenes with flashbacks to winter and the current setting of end-of-winter \ start of spring.      The films with a great outdoor scene with a snowplow.

image.jpeg.98bf9cb1a8687def2486ac2e4a4f97d1.jpeg

I liked NIGHTFALL. It's interesting that DAVID GOODIS novels tend to make decent movies because he is hands-down my least favorite writer of the genre.

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Nightfall is a fine Columbia noir film with Ado Ray,   Brian Keith and Anne Brancroft;   Yea,  lot of nice outdoor scenes with flashbacks to winter and the current setting of end-of-winter \ start of spring.      The film ends with a great outdoor scene with a snowplow.

image.jpeg.98bf9cb1a8687def2486ac2e4a4f97d1.jpeg

Yea Nightfall for sure part LA part Wyoming, also The Come On with Sterling Hayden and a cute Anne Baxter (supposed to be Mexico), and probably The  3rd Voice, with Edmund O'Brien a hot Julie London and  Laraine Day (supposed to be Mexico also).  Also add in The Postman Always Rings Twice, Impact, Framed and Date With Death with Gerald Mohr and Liz Renay. 

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7 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Border Incident, Highway Dragnet, The Scarf, most of Detour, Ace In The Hole, Cry Vengeance, The Hitch-Hiker, House By The River, Jeopardy, Key Largo, Moonrise, the last half of On Dangerous Ground, parts of Out of The Past, The Red HouseStorm Fear, The Girl In Black StockingsWoman On The Beach. Depending on what you consider rural add Ride The Pink Horse, Road House and Suddenly. Probably a few more like Beyond The Forest.

The Girl in Black Stockings is fairly interesting.  As much for the location as anything else.  Almost all of it takes place at the Parry Lodge in Kanab UT.  Couple of off site visits to sheriff's office and lumber mill.  Parry Lodge is real and still exists.   The brothers who owned it had travelled to Hollywood some time back and sold it and the surrounding locations as ideal for filming.  Glen, Bryce and Zion Canyons are all close.  Mamie Van Doren is featured on the poster, but actually had a fairly minor role.  She is not the girl in black stockings.

Oh, and Lex Barkers' car is convertible version of my icon to the left.

Thegirlinblackstockings.jpg

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I liked NIGHTFALL. It's interesting that DAVID GOODIS novels tend to make decent movies because he is hands-down my least favorite writer of the genre.

Never read any David Goodis novels  but I have seen the 3 American versions of his films: Dark Passage,   The Burglar and of course Nightfall.      Some like The Burglar were also remade as foreign films (French in this case but since Dyan Canyon is also in it there is English dialogue),   but I haven't seen them.  

Goodis also wrote the screenplay for The Unfaithful (a somewhat remake of The Letter).  

I like The Burglar since it has Martha Vickers in one of her last film roles and Dan Duryea in a leading performance.    

Theburglarposter.jpg

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I love the film The Burglar. I think it's Dan Duryea's finest performance in a film. Wish TCM would show this one more often. Dark Passage, imo, is one the best noirs of all. I like Nightfall very much. I can't say I've read Goodis' novels I've only seen some of the films adapted from them so I can't comment about how true the films are to Goodis vision. I'm just ok with The Unfaithful. Good cast Ann Sheridan and Zachary Scott and Eve Arden. I think it's Eve Arden's character that bothers me about this film. Her turn around from gossip to understanding friend is awkward.  Since these are film examples of David Goodis' works and as I said don't know if they are true to his novels but if they are,then I think he was a great talent.

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10 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Great list Joe. maybe add Touch of Evil and Beware My Lovely  and  Nightfall.  Nightfall,  although some of it takes place in the city, quite a bit of the film is  also is set in a rural setting, I think Wyoming

Right, lav, all three of those are good noir titles that are not set in classic noir urban settings.  And all are fine noirs.  Touch of Evil  is in a class of its own. Beware My Lovely is interesting for a number of reasons, not least of which is, as of course you know,  it reunites Ida Lupino and Robert Ryan  (after On Dangerous Ground.) I think it's one of the earliest explorations in film of  the theme of a woman being  trapped in her home with a psycho person.  But it's very nuanced,  with good acting (hey, Lupino and Ryan, can't go wrong)  and some very suspenseful moments.

I love Nightfall.  You're right, I'd say about half the film, maybe more, takes place in a rural setting, mountainous and snowy.  It's so good, I've always liked Aldo Ray and think he's under-recognized. And anyone who's only seen Anne Bancroft in her later roles has got to check her out in Nightfall.  It's a really interesting story; parts of it reminded me of Fargo  (the treasure in the snow thing, and the crazy thug...)

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IN RE: the novels of DAVID GOODIS

I'm sorry if this comes off as harsh.

DARK PASSAGE- though it is VERY MUCH LIKE THE MOVIE- just did not do it for me.

NIGHT SQUAD- Have you ever read or seen something and 60 pages/minutes in you were like: "IF [SUCH AND SUCH] IS THE PLOT TWIST AT THE END OF THIS THING, I AM GONNA BE PEEVED" and SURE ENOUGH, you guessed right on both counts?

SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER aka DOWN THERE- This book is about 160 pages long. I ordered a copy off amazon. I got to page 150, realized I really didn't care how it ended, and took it straight to the donation bin at the library. Is there any more damning critique of a mystery novel than that?

I just don't like him as a writer. I know he wrote other things, and I want to say I have maybe read some of them and forgotten.

I'm awful.

edit- I mean I have read them and forgotten them. i never FOR A MOMENT forget that I am AWFUL.

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So just checking  TCM schedule here for Noir Alley and it curiously it shows Night And The City and Crime Wave on .....  Crime Wave BTW was just on Sterling Hayden day.  The official Noir Alley schedule shows Crime Wave and I think Eddie mentioned Crime Wave so what is it?

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

So just checking  TCM schedule here for Noir Alley and it curiously it shows Night And The City and Crime Wave on .....  Crime Wave BTW was just on Sterling Hayden day.  The official Noir Alley schedule shows Crime Wave and I think Eddie mentioned Crime Wave so what is it?

If you mean,  what is the title being featured on Noir Alley this weekend, it's Crime Wave

 Night and the City is undeniably a noir, and a very good one, that happened to be airing on TCM at noon today (March 28th), which is not the Noir Alley timeslot.  As you know, joe, TCM often shows film noir movies aside from the Noir Alley program. 

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12 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

If you mean,  what is the title being featured on Noir Alley this weekend, it's Crime Wave

 Night and the City is undeniably a noir, and a very good one, that happened to be airing on TCM at noon today (March 28th), which is not the Noir Alley timeslot.  As you know, joe, TCM often shows film noir movies aside from the Noir Alley program. 

Yes read it wrong  yes it's Crime Wave which was just on the other day.

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For anyone interested, even though Crime Wave is a repeat showing for Noir Alley (originally scheduled in 2018), Eddie is providing new pre- and post- material this time as well.  If you missed it Saturday night, Noir Alley completists have another chance to catch it Sunday morning.

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I've noticed this every time I've watched Crime Wave, notice how Hank Worden is probably the only flaw in the entire film. His reading of his line about  Steve Lacey being the "best A&E Mechanic" and ends with  "married to a motor" sounds like he's having trouble reading it off a cue card. What was Hank  Worden's story?

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10 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

For anyone interested, even though Crime Wave is a repeat showing for Noir Alley (originally scheduled in 2018), Eddie is providing new pre- and post- material this time as well.  If you missed it Saturday night, Noir Alley completists have another chance to catch it Sunday morning.

A good film and a good intro both. "I like cigarettes" :lol: 

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Crime Wave was OK, but most interesting part for me was the cast.  Phyllis Kirk later went on to both seasons of The Thin Man TV series co-staring with Peter Lawford.  I managed to record a few episodes of it from TV a few years ago.  Unfortunately it is not available on DVD.

The scene where the two patrol officers found the stolen gray Lincoln was interesting is that their call sign was phonetically 1-A-1-2.  Later would gain fame as 1 Adam 12 for the Adam 12 TV series.

I believe at some point later Sterling Hayden wrote novels.  While I can see some similarities between his character and that of Bud White in LA Confidential, I don't see as much as Eddie Muller indicated during the intro.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

I've noticed this every time I've watched Crime Wave, notice how Hank Worden is probably the only flaw in the entire film. His reading of his line about  Steve Lacey being the "best A&E Mechanic" and ends with  "married to a motor" sounds like he's having trouble reading it off a cue card. What was Hank  Worden's story?

Now this is funny;   I watched Crime Wave,  yet again,   and the one thing that really stuck out was that short scene with Worden.    It was weak.     This was a very short scene and at a one-time-only location.      Since the film had to be completed in two weeks,   I assume that after reviewing the rushes De Toth just felt it wasn't worth the time and cost of re-shooting.       The scene really wasn't necessary (e.g. one could have just shown the PO and Lacey getting into a car with the PO saying "I'm taking you back to the job").    Instead of just cutting it out De Toth decided to leave it in.

 

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19 minutes ago, TheCid said:

I believe at some point later Sterling Hayden wrote novels.  While I can see some similarities between his character and that of Bud White in LA Confidential, I don't see as much as Eddie Muller indicated during the intro.

Here is the actual quote from the Author of L.A. Confidential.

The Author James Ellroy on his commentary on the DVD for Crime Wave "Sterling Hayden-- That is my Bud White. That is my Bud White! f**k Russell Crowe in 'L A Confidential.' I mean he was okay, but he's a shrimpy little s**t  Bud White as Bud Whites go. Sterling Hayden is the real deal. Look at this! He's not even acting. Look at that hat!" 'nuff said.

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14 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Here is the actual quote from the Author of L.A. Confidential.

The Author James Ellroy on his commentary on the DVD for Crime Wave "Sterling Hayden-- That is my Bud White. That is my Bud White! f**k Russell Crowe in 'L A Confidential.' I mean he was okay, but he's a shrimpy little s**t  Bud White as Bud Whites go. Sterling Hayden is the real deal. Look at this! He's not even acting. Look at that hat!" 'nuff said.

Thanks.  Gets more confusing to me.  Has nothing to do with their heights or physical appearance, but Hayden was just plain mean/evil up until the final scene in the movie.  Bud White (Crowe) seemed to be a policeman of limited intellect who got to be a sergeant by being physically abusive.  But he also was not inherently mean or evil.  He would go no further in LAPD and knew it.  He participated in abusing people at the Victory Motel because he felt forced to.  Hayden's character would have done it because he liked to.  Also, Hayden's character was more intellectually developed and therefore a lieutenant in charge of the investigation.

Of course Elroy probably knew what he was trying to portray in the book, but I haven't read it.  Therefore not sure what the Bud White character was like in his book.

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2 hours ago, TheCid said:

Thanks.  Gets more confusing to me.  Has nothing to do with their heights or physical appearance, but Hayden was just plain mean/evil up until the final scene in the movie.  Bud White (Crowe) seemed to be a policeman of limited intellect who got to be a sergeant by being physically abusive.  But he also was not inherently mean or evil.  He would go no further in LAPD and knew it.  He participated in abusing people at the Victory Motel because he felt forced to.  Hayden's character would have done it because he liked to.  Also, Hayden's character was more intellectually developed and therefore a lieutenant in charge of the investigation.

Of course Elroy probably knew what he was trying to portray in the book, but I haven't read it.  Therefore not sure what the Bud White character was like in his book.

Come on Cid your second to last sentence is a hoot;     an author's mind-view portrayal of his charter is 100% "on-target" by default.    Probably knew?????    Please don't take this as harsh criticism but instead find the humor in even implying an author (or songwriter,  or actor,,,,  any creative person),  doesn't know in their mind-view what they are trying to portray.         (now how successful a creative person is at putting over their mind-view portrayal to an audience is a much different ball of wax).

Also,   I never viewed the Hayden cop in Crime Wave as mean/evil.      Instead he was situational:   he would use meanness and harsh techniques to try to trap someone to get information but I didn't believe it was the core of his persona as a detective.     E.g.   when they bring in all the low life characters right after the cop killing  and there is the guy that is an informer that says that he is willing to help but,,,; come on guys,    having the police pick me up so openly,    you're going to get me harmed.     He then wonders if he can go back to work.     Of course Hayden doesn't apologize but he does let the informer go back to work and tells the cop who picked him up that he made a mistake.    I.e. there was  understanding and compassion there towards the informer's situation.   This scene takes places right after it is confirmed that the hoods are the escaped prisoners.        Thus NO need for harsh techniques anymore (as it relates to all the low life characters they had brought in for questioning).      I.e. situational techniques not an indication of a persona.

 PS:  having a job and working was a sub-theme used throughout the entire film.        It comes up in about 5 or 6 different scenes between different people.    Of course there is Lacey having to keep his job,    his wife and her job (and Hayden allowing her to go back after taking Lacey to jail),    the hoods and how they mock work,   the veterinarian and the fact he was a doctor of humans but now can only work on animals (Hayden and the vet talk about his past work),     that informer,   and the ending where the detective sum up life for working class stiffs like Lacey and his wife.    

 

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