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Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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10 hours ago, TomJH said:

I'm born and raised near Toronto. One time when I was in Vegas a store owner asked me if I was from Australia because of my accent. I had to explain to him that I had no accent (which was more than I could say for him).

I was born and raised in Toronto.  Yeah Tom,  we don't have any accent at all,  it's everyone else who does !  😜

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10 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I was born and raised in Toronto.  Yeah Tom,  we don't have any accent at all,  it's everyone else who does !  😜

That's right, MissW. It's just a fact of life.

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12 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I was born and raised in Toronto.  Yeah Tom,  we don't have any accent at all,  it's everyone else who does !  😜

That's why Southerners don't talk funny, it's everybody else.😀

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Because of the exodus from one area in the U.S. to Detroit for the auto industry jobs, whenever anyone spoke with a drawl it was hard to determine if they came from the South or Detroit!  :D  Funny thing....

I worked with a guy who was my age and moved up here with his folks in '53 so his dad could get a job in a plant( turned out to be the one I worked in too)  and this co-worker was 2 at that time and his Dad got him a job there too after the boy graduated high school( just like me and 90% of the "new hires" in the early '70's).  Anyway, after growing up here in MI and living here for near 50 years, he always said that when he retired, he was going  to go "back home"!  :o  (Mississippi).  And in all those years he once said he'd only been to Miss. once for a family member's funeral in '64.

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Because of the exodus from one area in the U.S. to Detroit for the auto industry jobs, whenever anyone spoke with a drawl it was hard to determine if they came from the South or Detroit!  :D  Funny thing....

I worked with a guy who was my age and moved up here with his folks in '53 so his dad could get a job in a plant( turned out to be the one I worked in too)  and this co-worker was 2 at that time and his Dad got him a job there too after the boy graduated high school( just like me and 90% of the "new hires" in the early '70's).  Anyway, after growing up here in MI and living here for near 50 years, he always said that when he retired, he was going  to go "back home"!  :o  (Mississippi).  And in all those years he once said he'd only been to Miss. once for a family member's funeral in '64.

Sepiatone

Had an uncle I really didn't who moved from LA  (the sate) to Detroit.  His son ended up working as an engineer or something for Ford - never even met him.

My father moved from LA to coastal S.C. in 1936 and lived there until 1974.  Then he moved back home to LA and really made my mother, my sister and me mad.  He assumed my sister and I (both born in S.C.) would follow him back to northeast LA.  We didn't.  He later admitted it was the biggest mistake he made.  But he stayed there.  We did go back once or twice a year for "vacations."  Not sure visiting relatives is really a vacation.

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More International Noir

Dedee d'Anvers (1948) Director Yves Allegret. French Film Noir


MV5BZWY0ZTQxMTYtZmFjNi00ZDkxLTkyMTMtOTE2

As kingrat mentioned to me  it's -The film that put Simone Signoret on the map, with Marcello Pagliero, Bernard Blier, and Marcel Dalio. Dedee (Signoret) is a popular prostitute working Mr. Rene's (Blier), nightclub in Antwerp's red light district. She sleeps with her pimp Marco (Dalio). Marco is in debt to a gangster and pushes Dedee to pull more tricks. Francesco an Italian ship captain falls in love with her and promises to take her with him. Marco gets desperate. It's got quite a surprising ending. Good story and nice cinematography. Signoret looks a lot like Lauren Bacall in this. 7/10

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51 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

More International Noir

Dedee d'Anvers (1948) Director Yves Allegret. French Film Noir


MV5BZWY0ZTQxMTYtZmFjNi00ZDkxLTkyMTMtOTE2

As kingrat mentioned to me  it's -The film that put Simone Signoret on the map, with Marcello Pagliero, Bernard Blier, and Marcel Dalio. Dedee (Signoret) is a popular prostitute working Mr. Rene's (Blier), nightclub in Antwerp's red light district. She sleeps with her pimp Marco (Dalio). Marco is in debt to a gangster and pushes Dedee to pull more tricks. Francesco an Italian ship captain falls in love with her and promises to take her with him. Marco gets desperate. It's got quite a surprising ending. Good story and nice cinematography. Signoret looks a lot like Lauren Bacall in this. 7/10

Another fine international noir which I have seen.    I seen 3 or so such post WWII French films with Marco Dalio since I knew him from his WB work during WWII in films like Casablanca and To Have and Have Not.         I kind of recall one film that stared Gabin and Dalio where they travel in the countryside in the snow.

 

 

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Address Unknown (1944) Drama Noir

Address Unknown Poster

Felt pretty Noir to me.  Two friends and partners in a San Francisco art gallery, one a German one a Jew get caught up in Nazi  intrigue. A Drama/Psychological and you can say in a way a Propaganda Noir. In the same vein as The Lost WeekendIn A Lonely Place. The Wrong Man,  A Streetcar Named Desire and for the propaganda "card carrying commie" noir I Married A Communist, all the conflicts, obsessions, and alienations are internal. Interesting seeing Frank Faylen in  another Noir. BTW he also has bit parts in The Lost WeekendThe Blue Dahlia, , Fourteen Hours, 99 River StreetDetective Story, The Sniper,  and  Western Noir Blood On The Moon. 7/10

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Watching that now and enjoying it.

I just wish they'd stop showing that "promo" for "Noir Alley" in which "noir poser" Eddie Muller wears that cheezy looking Dollar General straw Fedora.  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

Watching that now and enjoying it.

I just wish they'd stop showing that "promo" for "Noir Alley" in which "noir poser" Eddie Muller wears that cheezy looking Dollar General straw Fedora.  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

And I just wish you'd cease with the constant little digs at Eddie Muller.  No, I'm not a sycophantic "he can do no wrong" type fan of the guy, I just find your seemingly unending jibes at him, mostly about trivial things,  kind of annoying.  Eddie likes to be silly, which is one thing I like about him.  Look at the Noir Alley promo where he talks about Noir Alley, mentioning that it can  be seen either in its late night time slot, or its morning one.  So,  booze for Saturday night, coffee for Sunday morning.  Which beverage should he imbibe?  Easily settled...he pours the booze into his coffee cup !  Problem solved.   Just an example of how he's kind of playful, and as far as I can see, doesn't take himself too seriously.

I still don't understand why so many people seem to think he's a "noir poser".  I've seen no evidence of that. 

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12 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

And I just wish you'd cease with the constant little digs at Eddie Muller.  No, I'm not a sycophantic "he can do no wrong" type fan of the guy, I just find your seemingly unending jibes at him, mostly about trivial things,  kind of annoying. 

Well I find your constant little digs at others about their little digs,  kind of annoying  (but not unexpected).     Note that Sepia did end his sentence with a smiley,   which to me says he was just cracking wise (as well as the Dollar General crack which I found humorous).     Also he was just referring to the promo and not Eddie's presentation last night.

With regards to last night;   We enjoyed the film and Eddie's comments.    What I liked most about the film was the photography;   some stunning b&w photography in this film,  both indoor and outdoor scenes.       Nice.

 

 

 

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I thoroughly enjoyed ADDRESS UNKNOWN. It wasn't a true noir, but it had many of the elements. Eddie was right about the visuals. They were extraordinary. The only flaw I found in the film was when Elsa had a baby.  I can't figure out why that was added to the script. Elsa didn't appear pregnant when she came downstairs the night Griselle was killed and she a Martin seemed too old to handle an infant. Maybe it was in the book, but I didn't see it adding much to the film. That said, overall it's a great story and the presentation was well done.

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Address Unknown  was good, it engaged my attention for the whole of its 72 minutes, and had lovely black and white noirish visuals -- particularly that prison-like mansion in Germany where Schulz moved to, with its wrought-iron gate and all the shadows from its ornate strange windows. There's a lovely shot of poor desperate Schulz wandering distractedly down the staircase, with that huge criss-crossed window behind him.

So, "that said",  this was the kind of film that , while I'm watching it, I'm completely involved, never bored, and feel it's at the least, a "good" movie. Which it was.  But it's also the kind of movie that, a little while after I've seen it, I start thinking about things that could have been done differently.  so, not a "perfect" movie  (not that anyone claimed it was.)

My main problem with it was, I guess because of its brevity ( which is a good thing, in the main),  we don't get enough of what's going on in Schulz's mind,  the audience has to just infer a lot about him.  His motivations for siding with the Nazis seem mixed;  he really does seem a little convinced by the Baron's propagandistic (is that a word?) rantings about the virtues of the "new" Germany;  but his reasons for joining them appear to be mostly a combination of vanity that the Baron has chosen him to bestow the Reich's favour upon, plus, at some point, fear.  almost entirely, by the half-way point of the film,  fear.

But the film made such a point at the beginning of showing what a strong friendship existed between Schulz and Eisenstein , it's hard to believe Schulz would give that up so readily.  One has to ask, why didn't he, as soon as he started to perceive where things were going,  gather up his family and return to the States while he still could?  Why didn't he warn his friend's daughter (the ill-fated Griselle Eisenstein), when she came to visit him the first time,  what was starting to happen, and to get out, asap  ??

I know one of the virtues of the film is its brevity, as previously noted, and that any additional dialogue would have increased its length. However, a little more insight into Schulz's psyche, into why he made the choices he did, would have made the movie more interesting.  Even just one short scene, possibly a conversation with his wife (who clearly disagreed with what he was doing), would  have been enlightening.

In the end, what was the saddest and most thought-provoking aspect of Address Unknown, was the fact that Schulz died, shot by the Nazis because they believed him to be a spy/Resistance fighter*,  when in fact he wasn't.  But neither was he in any way benefiting from his previous co-operation, his seeming idealogical compliance with the Reich. He had neither the safety and status of being one of them,  nor the moral satisfaction, when the Nazis finally came and shot him, of knowing he'd worked against them and done the right thing, therefore dying a hero.  He was cowardly and disloyal to his friends, and  his death was meaningless.

Yet Paul Lukas still makes his character sympathetic,  and we feel a bit sorry for him and what happens to him.  Maybe it's a good thing he never found out those incriminating coded letters he kept receiving were coming from his own son.

 

* (not sure they were called "Resistance fighters" in the late '30s, in the years before the actual war began, but whatever the pre-war equivalent was...)

 

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31 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Well I find your constant little digs at others about their little digs,  kind of annoying  (but not unexpected).     Note that Sepia did end his sentence with a smiley,   which to me says he was just cracking wise (as well as the Dollar General crack which I found humorous).     Also he was just referring to the promo and not Eddie's presentation last night.

With regards to last night;   We enjoyed the film and Eddie's comments.    What I liked most about the film was the photography;   some stunning b&w photography in this film,  both indoor and outdoor scenes.       Nice.

 

 

 

The smiley faces are dumb, and are often used passive-aggressively,  eg, someone says something a bit mean or negative, but then adds a smiley or winky emoji at the end of their post, as though that kind of ameliorates the mean-spiritedness of the post.

And actually,  I'm pretty sure that I don't make "constant little digs" at others.   

Now, yes, I admit, I can be critical or possibly even mean myself sometimes, but at least I don't stick on a meaningless smiley-face at the end of the post to get away with it.

Anyway, I intend no nastiness towards Sepia, I just think his ongoing jibes at Eddie Muller are pointless and yes, a little cranky.  And we all already know he has little use for Mr. Muller.

 

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42 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

But the film made such a point at the beginning of showing what a strong friendship existed between Schulz and Eisenstein , it's hard to believe Schulz would give that up so readily.  One has to ask, why didn't he, as soon as he started to perceive where things were going,  gather up his family and return to the States while he still could?  Why didn't he warn his friend's daughter (the ill-fated Griselle Eisenstein), when she came to visit him the first time,  what was starting to happen, and to get out, asap  ??

Agree, you'd probably have to read the  Kressmann Taylor story it was based on. 

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39 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

 

And actually,  I'm pretty sure that I don't make "constant little digs" at others.   

 

In your defense, you didn't come back at me on my comments about Mary Astor (which I fully expected). I guess because of your name I assumed you were a fan.

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13 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

In your defense, you didn't come back at me on my comments about Mary Astor (which I fully expected). I guess because of your name I assumed you were a fan.

With regards to Mary Astor and her being cast in The Maltese Falcon;  I'm reading the book John Huston - Courage and Art.    

John and Mary were sleeping together at the time (John's father,  Walter, introduced them since they knew each other from Dodsworth).    John was aware of her public divorce (where her husband tried to get her diary released in court,  failed,  but then released key sections to the press,   once that gave her the nickname of 20 or- ****).  

I.e. They were the same age and John found Mary to be sexy and sexual with a high level of class,  and thus fit for the part in the film of an international adventure.      Of course he also respected her acting and felt the role took this type of experienced actor.       

I have never had an issue with Mary Astor in the role.        

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Watching that now and enjoying it.

I just wish they'd stop showing that "promo" for "Noir Alley" in which "noir poser" Eddie Muller wears that cheezy looking Dollar General straw Fedora.  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

I love Eddie Muller but I am appalled by the very-thinly-veiled "Fedora infomercial" TCM is running with him at the moment.  Hmmmm.  Let me see, TCM Executives.  Did your web store get stuck with a bunch of fedoras (priced $83 and up) that nobody wants to buy??  What should you do??  Oh, I've got it. Have Eddie shill them for you under the pretext of a segment about  "Who Eddie Thinks Wears A Fedora Well." Really don't think anybody cares . And, personally, I think Sterling Hayden looks like a doofus in that flattened fedora . . . 

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2 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

In your defense, you didn't come back at me on my comments about Mary Astor (which I fully expected). I guess because of your name I assumed you were a fan.

Just to set the record straight:  although I like Mary Astor well enough, I'm not what you'd call a dedicated fan, and any admiration I have for the actress is NOT the reason for my screen/user name here.  I've explained this before, but I don't mind doing so again...I chose the user name "misswonderly" not so much because of Mary Astor herself, but because that's the name she first uses when we initially see her in  The Maltese Falcon.  Of course, later, we find out she's really "Brigid O'Shaughnessy"  (maybe).  But I always thought the name "Miss Wonderly" is so obviously fake,  and so funny, -- I mean, honestly, have you ever met anyone with that name?-- that I decided to go with it here.  I also thought it might indicate a bit of classic movie chops, referring to the less -used alias of the character in that movie.  

It had more to do with all that than any kind of particular fandom for Mary Astor.

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I think most here enjoy Eddie's info and like him and consider him a great addition to TCM. I know I do. I also don't enjoy reading or agree with the jabs taken at Eddie. I certainly do not think missW insults others on the bds. She's one of the most intelligent posters and writes beautifully and I always enjoy reading missW's posts.

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A touch above the usual anti-Nazi flick. The Baron gave the whole thing a little touch of class,

though he didn't seem as sinister as he could have. And the usual street fighting thugs weren't

around, which made a things a bit dull. I found the plot not very believable, I mean even more

unbelievable than the standard unbelievability of Hollywood movies. Schulz should have figured

out after the Baron's last visit that he was in deep doo doo and gotten the hell out of Munich.

Maybe his nerves were just too addled to figure that out. Sure there were some interesting

visual touches, but they seemed too familiar and well worn. I sort of checked them off in my

mind as they appeared one after another. Got it. I can see why Address Unknown, though it has

a few interesting points to it, isn't better known or more popular. 

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Next week on Noir Alley is 1956's Beyond a Reasonable Doubt with noir leading man Dana Andrews,  and directed by Fritz Lang  (his last noir film,  as well as last American film).     The film also stars Joan Fontaine.      Not one of my favorites but it has it moments in its 80 minute running time.      Looking forward to what Eddie Muller has to say.   

 

  Beyond a Reasonable Doubt movie poster.jpg

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5 hours ago, lydecker said:

I love Eddie Muller but I am appalled by the very-thinly-veiled "Fedora infomercial" TCM is running with him at the moment.  Hmmmm.  Let me see, TCM Executives.  Did your web store get stuck with a bunch of fedoras (priced $83 and up) that nobody wants to buy??  What should you do??  Oh, I've got it. Have Eddie shill them for you under the pretext of a segment about  "Who Eddie Thinks Wears A Fedora Well." Really don't think anybody cares . And, personally, I think Sterling Hayden looks like a doofus in that flattened fedora . . . 

Hey,  are you calling me a  doofus!

image.jpeg.a62e78cde3785b6814b23c780121da7d.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Vautrin said:

A touch above the usual anti-Nazi flick. The Baron gave the whole thing a little touch of class,

though he didn't seem as sinister as he could have. And the usual street fighting thugs weren't

around, which made a things a bit dull. I found the plot not very believable, I mean even more

unbelievable than the standard unbelievability of Hollywood movies. Schulz should have figured

out after the Baron's last visit that he was in deep doo doo and gotten the hell out of Munich.

Maybe his nerves were just too addled to figure that out. Sure there were some interesting

visual touches, but they seemed too familiar and well worn. I sort of checked them off in my

mind as they appeared one after another. Got it. I can see why Address Unknown, though it has

a few interesting points to it, isn't better known or more popular. 

I thought the camerawork, use of shadows, etc was really well-done, but outside of that, I didn't really get into it. I ended up zoning out towards the end when everything started to get exciting. I did like how you never really saw who was chasing them. It gave off a very expressionist vibe to me. 

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