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4 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

I thought the camerawork, use of shadows, etc was really well-done, but outside of that, I didn't really get into it. I ended up zoning out towards the end when everything started to get exciting. I did like how you never really saw who was chasing them. It gave off a very expressionist vibe to me. 

Yes the visuals add something to the movie, though I think that after a while they become somewhat obvious.

I think the best sequence was the mob cutting through the theater curtain as Griselle makes a run for it and

the pursuit across the muddy field. Not a bad movie, just one that didn't make much of an impression on me.

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I was hoping someone would pick up on my comment about the baby. Any thoughts on why that was added? Was it in the book? Maybe it magnified Elsa's reason's for leaving, but one would think her wanting to protect the other three boys would be reason enough. 

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19 hours ago, lydecker said:

I love Eddie Muller but I am appalled by the very-thinly-veiled "Fedora infomercial" TCM is running with him at the moment.  Hmmmm.  Let me see, TCM Executives.  Did your web store get stuck with a bunch of fedoras (priced $83 and up) that nobody wants to buy??  What should you do??  Oh, I've got it. Have Eddie shill them for you under the pretext of a segment about  "Who Eddie Thinks Wears A Fedora Well." Really don't think anybody cares . And, personally, I think Sterling Hayden looks like a doofus in that flattened fedora . . . 

Haven't caught that "Fedora infomercial" you refer to yet.  Interesting.  And as y'all know, I like the late '40's-early '50's Fedora style hat.  One thing that bothers me though, is that for some reason, they've become part of the cliched blues musicians "uniform" for those who think the clothes you wear and the type and age of guitar you play are important to being a "true" bluesman. :rolleyes:  And I agree about Hayden looking like a doofus in that hat in THE KILLING.  Eddie thinks it's "cool", but then, Eddie's pretty much a doofus too.  ;) 

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2 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

I was hoping someone would pick up on my comment about the baby. Any thoughts on why that was added? Was it in the book? Maybe it magnified Elsa's reason's for leaving, but one would think her wanting to protect the other three boys would be reason enough. 

I agree, Hoganman, I too thought Schulz and his wife seemed much too old to have a baby.  They both looked like they were at least in their 50s.  I even thought that at the very beginning, when that brood of little boys, apparently all Mr. and Mrs. Schulz's children, ran into the scene.  At first I thought they must be their grandchildren.  It's much more believable that they also had an adult son  (the fiance of Griselle Eisenstein), who looked to be in his late 20s. 

I don't plan to read the book, so I guess I'll never know if that part about Mrs. Schulz having a baby in Munich was added to the film, or was in the novel. If they added it to show Schulz's wife's disapproval of her husband  (not letting him pick up the baby, etc.), they might have indicated that some other way. As I suggested earlier, even just a short scene where the two of them have a conversation about why Schulz is co-operating so much with the Nazis, and his wife telling him she thinks it is wrong, would have been helpful. We also might have gained a little more insight into exactly why Schulz would choose to change not only his moral principles but apparently his entire personality. 

Anyway, yes, the sight of a lady who looked like she was in her 50s having a newborn baby was unrealistic, and even a bit jarring.  (This is not to say that she wasn't attractive, as an "older" lady. Just didn't seem to be of child-bearing age.)

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Just FYI, a special evening of Noir films is coming up on TCM this Tuesday April 7, when the primetime theme is titled “1948 in Noir”.

As the title implies, all films that evening are from the year 1948.

The full lineup for Tuesday (times are Eastern):

    8:00p    Cry of the City (1948)             (a TCM premiere)
    10:00p  The Lady From Shanghai (1948)    (scheduled for Noir Alley in June)
    11:45p  He Walked By Night (1948)    (Noir Alley April 2017)
    1:15a    Key Largo (1948)                    (Noir Alley May 2019)
    3:15a    Berlin Express (1948)             (Noir Alley Dec 2019)
    5:00a    The Naked City (1948)           (not yet included in Noir Alley)

What are the chances that Eddie will do the introductions?

 

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1 hour ago, cmovieviewer said:

Just FYI, a special evening of Noir films is coming up on TCM this Tuesday April 7, when the primetime theme is titled “1948 in Noir”.

As the title implies, all films that evening are from the year 1948.

The full lineup for Tuesday (times are Eastern):

    8:00p    Cry of the City (1948)             (a TCM premiere)
    10:00p  The Lady From Shanghai (1948)    (scheduled for Noir Alley in June)
    11:45p  He Walked By Night (1948)    (Noir Alley April 2017)
    1:15a    Key Largo (1948)                    (Noir Alley May 2019)
    3:15a    Berlin Express (1948)             (Noir Alley Dec 2019)
    5:00a    The Naked City (1948)           (not yet included in Noir Alley)

What are the chances that Eddie will do the introductions?

 

Maybe Eddie will introduce The Lady From Shanghai and The Naked City,   just because Ted de Corsia is in them.     He really likes this guy's mug based on his comments about Crime Wave.

TeddeCorsia.JPG

 

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I figured the baby wasn't their biological child but a Lebensborn adoption, the result of a wild and

crazy night at SS headquarters nine months earlier. 

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On 4/5/2020 at 10:34 AM, misswonderly3 said:

....My main problem with it was, I guess because of its brevity ( which is a good thing, in the main),  we don't get enough of what's going on in Schulz's mind,  the audience has to just infer a lot about him.  His motivations for siding with the Nazis seem mixed;  he really does seem a little convinced by the Baron's propagandistic (is that a word?) rantings about the virtues of the "new" Germany;  but his reasons for joining them appear to be mostly a combination of vanity that the Baron has chosen him to bestow the Reich's favour upon, plus, at some point, fear.  almost entirely, by the half-way point of the film,  fear.

...But the film made such a point at the beginning of showing what a strong friendship existed between Schulz and Eisenstein , it's hard to believe Schulz would give that up so readily.  One has to ask, why didn't he, as soon as he started to perceive where things were going,  gather up his family and return to the States while he still could?  Why didn't he warn his friend's daughter (the ill-fated Griselle Eisenstein), when she came to visit him the first time,  what was starting to happen, and to get out, asap  ??

Yep, have to say this was my main issue with the way ol' Schulzy is portrayed too, MissW. But in my case it even started at the very beginning of the story. 

You see, right from the opening shot, director Menzies shows the guy at his very nice home sharing drinks with his then best buddy Max at that most picturesque of spots overlooking the San Francisco Bay located within one of the most lovely of climates to be found on earth and not to mention overlooking one of the most beautiful cities on earth (okay sure, obviously a mate painting in this flick, but still), but THEN the guys  says he wants to LEAVE San Francisco and to move to MUNICH?! What kind of an idiot would do THAT, I ask? 

And so, right off the BAT I'm thinin' ol' Schulzy probably wasn't playin' with a full deck, as they say!

Now don't get me wrong here. Ya see, I've been to the capital city of Bavaria a couple of times myself over the years (in fact, I highly recommend a visit to the BMW museum located there, although this might be because I'm a real gearhead, ya know) and Munich is a lovely town, but it sure as hell ISN'T as lovely a town as San Francisco is, ya know!

(...I mean, nobody's ever written a song about leavin' their heart in MUNICH, now have THEY?!) 

 ;)

 

 

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18 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

Just FYI, a special evening of Noir films is coming up on TCM this Tuesday April 7, when the primetime theme is titled “1948 in Noir”.

As the title implies, all films that evening are from the year 1948.

The full lineup for Tuesday (times are Eastern):

    8:00p    Cry of the City (1948)             (a TCM premiere)
    10:00p  The Lady From Shanghai (1948)    (scheduled for Noir Alley in June)
    11:45p  He Walked By Night (1948)    (Noir Alley April 2017)
    1:15a    Key Largo (1948)                    (Noir Alley May 2019)
    3:15a    Berlin Express (1948)             (Noir Alley Dec 2019)
    5:00a    The Naked City (1948)           (not yet included in Noir Alley)

What are the chances that Eddie will do the introductions?

 

What a great line-up. It's amazing all of these good films were released in 1948. I'll have to get my video recorder humming tonight. 

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On 4/5/2020 at 10:21 AM, Hoganman1 said:

I thoroughly enjoyed ADDRESS UNKNOWN. It wasn't a true noir, but it had many of the elements. Eddie was right about the visuals. They were extraordinary. The only flaw I found in the film was when Elsa had a baby.  I can't figure out why that was added to the script. Elsa didn't appear pregnant when she came downstairs the night Griselle was killed and she a Martin seemed too old to handle an infant. Maybe it was in the book, but I didn't see it adding much to the film. That said, overall it's a great story and the presentation was well done.

I thought that was weird too. They could have easily added a scene showing the new tension between Elsa and Martin. Honestly I thought it was weird they had so many young children and one older one. I wonder if there was significance behind the younger boys all being blonde (Aryan Race allusion, perhaps?) and the oldest brother having dark hair. 

i don’t know if they made Elsa pregnant to heighten the drama at her silent treatment toward Martin and needed an important moment to do so? 

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I watched 1 and 1/2 of those, I love Cry of the City (1948)  it's another "Street Scene Noir," BTW,  lol,  I caught the last half of that one about a couple of sequences just before Shelly Winter's pretty funny bar scene with drunk Howard Freeman in the nightclub.

Watched all of  The Lady From Shanghai (1948)  again, just wish Welles would have toned down or tossed  the Lucky Charms Leprechaun Irish accent, however when you think about it the whole film has  got  a weird audio going on with the Irish accent, the strange percussive music in the Acapulco sequence, and then add in Everett Sloan's pronunciation of  "lovey"  and Glenn Anders  bizarre sing-song live deliveries. 

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I hate to be a grouch, but I did not much like Cry of the City.  I'm glad TCM aired it, I'd never seen it before, so that's a plus.  And I like both Victor Mature and Richard Conte  -Conte in particular, I'm a big fan of.  But I don't think Cry of the City was really worthy of his talents.  I just couldn't seem to get very interested in Martin's endeavours, or Lt. Candella's attempts to catch him.  There were a few good scenes, yes, like Martin's  (Richard Conte)  escape from the prison,  and Shelly Winter's efforts to help Martin (including that bar scene  joe refers to.)

But overall, it felt a bit flat.  The best thing about the film was the look of it, all the great NYC  location shooting.

ps:  This will sound even grouchier:  After this, my third viewing of  The Lady from Shanghai,  I've decided I don't like it very much either.  I lose patience with the seemingly endless cruise scenes, all that double- edged talk, full of sub-text and insinuations.  I know everyone is supposed to be strange and alienated and unhappy and predatory - like Michael's shark story,  I know -- but it all feels like a screenwriter pulling the strings to me.  

Best thing about The Lady from Shanghai is that deservedly famous final climactic scene in the carnival funhouse.  Fantastic scene,  kind of makes up for all the other parts of the film I didn't like.

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Yeah.  It seems THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI is one of those movies that "come-lately" film buffs feel they HAVE to like in order to keep their "cred".  :rolleyes:

And as the son of VICTOR MATURE's  biggest fan, CRY OF THE CITY was pretty much routine for me.  I sit though it just so Mom won't haunt my sleep if I don't.  ;)

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3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Watched all of  The Lady From Shanghai (1948)  again, just wish Welles would have toned down or tossed  the Lucky Charms Leprechaun Irish accent, however when you think about it the whole film has  got  a weird audio going on with the Irish accent, the strange percussive music in the Acapulco sequence, and then add in Everett Sloan's pronunciation of  "lovey"  and Glenn Anders  bizarre sing-song live deliveries. 

The Lady from Shanghai is a good film to see on the big screen because you get to enjoy the great sequences of the film that way. However, Joe's objections seem valid to me. About Glenn Anders, whom one cannot believe is a high-powered lawyer in a big city (I've met quite a few): many of Welles' films have at least one supporting performance which is hammed up, and it usually involves a weird voice: Dennis Weaver's scenes in Touch of Evil are unwatchable for me; Dorothy Comingore is over the top in Citizen Kane; so is Akim Tamiroff in Mr. Arkadin; so is the actor who plays the elderly Justice Shallow in Chimes at Midnight. Welles clearly likes this kind of performance and encourages it.

I love the idea of showing several noir films from 1948. I taped Cry of the City and watched He Walked by Night, which had an outstanding print. The climactic chase through the sewer showed off the artistry of John Alton's cinematography and Anthony Mann's direction (although Alfred Werker gets the directing credit, Mann apparently directed most of the film, and it looks like his work). Richard Basehart doesn't have much dialogue, but he conveys the twisted character of the criminal exceptionally well. Just as Address Unknown doesn't show the development of the Paul Lukas character into becoming a Nazi, He Walked by Night doesn't look for incidents or motivations to explain the Basehart character. Basehart has the good looks of a leading man, but he usually plays offbeat characters.

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I watched 1 and 1/2 of those, I love Cry of the City (1948)  it's another "Street Scene Noir," BTW,  lol,  I caught the last half of that one about a couple of sequences just before Shelly Winter's pretty funny bar scene with drunk Howard Freeman in the bar.

Watched all of  The Lady From Shanghai (1948)  again, just wish Welles would have toned down or tossed  the Lucky Charms Leprechaun Irish accent, however when you think about it the whole film has  got  a weird audio going on with the Irish accent, the strange percussive music in the Acapulco sequence, and then add in Everett Sloan's pronunciation of  "lovey"  and Glenn Anders  bizarre sing-song live deliveries. 

I read on imdb that Orson Welles originally recorded the sound in a fashion so that it would serve as a disruption element and make the viewer feel unsettled.  He wanted some of the dialogue to be low volume so that it would be more difficult to make out what was being said. He also did something to make Bannister and Grisby's voices to sound grating. However, the Columbia sound department took it upon themselves to "fix" his audio.  I wonder if that is why it seems "off." 

I do agree Re: Orson's Irish accent.  I think he went a little overboard with  it.   I don't know if it was necessary for his character to have an Irish accent.  I think he easily could have ditched the accent and still played his "person who unknowingly gets involved in a crime" character. 

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While I wouldn't list The Lady From Shanghai even in my top 10 list of noir, there's something about the film that I find interesting--which leads me to re-watch it on occasion.  Of course, the final mirror scene is amazing--the best part of the film.  I also love the bizarre aquarium scene.  I would say that the photography and Rita's gorgeous face is probably what keeps me watching this film.  I also watch it because I always try to look for Errol Flynn who's allegedly in the cantina somewhere.  Orson Welles rented Flynn's yacht for the film, and supposedly he can be spotted in the film somewhere.  I don't know if this is true or just lore, but I always try to find him--and have yet to see anyone whom I'm convinced is actually Flynn. 

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I think the story of The Lady from Shanghai would have worked just as well if the Welles character had just been some American guy.   Michael O'Hara's Irishness had no bearing on or connection to the plot whatsoever.  I suspect Orson Welles just wanted to do an Irish accent, for some reason.  Michael never even mentions Ireland or speaks about his home country, in fact, the film makes much of his being a world traveller.   There's just no reason for the Irish thing, and I agree, his clearly not authentic Irish accent is just a distraction.

As for real Irish accents, I've been to Ireland, and there's a bit of a range in how Irish people sound, depending on regionality.  But basically, I love the way real Irish people speak, I could listen to those lovely cadences for hours.  American films from a certain era seemed to love inserting Irish accents, quite often fake ones, into their characters.  But I certainly love actual Irish dialects, music to my ears,  it is.

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1 minute ago, misswonderly3 said:

I think the story of The Lady from Shanghai would have worked just as well if the Welles character had just been some American guy.   Michael O'Hara's Irishness had no bearing on or connection to the plot whatsoever.  I suspect Orson Welles just wanted to do an Irish accent, for some reason.  Michael never even mentions Ireland or speaks about his home country, in fact, the film makes much of his being a world traveller.   There's just no reason for the Irish thing, and I agree, his clearly not authentic Irish accent is just a distraction.

As for real Irish accents, I've been to Ireland, and there's a bit of a range in how Irish people sound, depending on regionality.  But basically, I love the way real Irish people speak, I could listen to those lovely cadences for hours.  American films from a certain era seemed to love inserting Irish accents, quite often fake ones, into their characters.  But I certainly love actual Irish dialects, music to my ears,  it is.

The only reference that Welles' character makes to being non-American is toward the beginning of the film when he first meets Rita.  He asks her if (such and such, I can't remember) is how it is done in this country.  

The only thing I can think of is that by making Welles' character Irish, it maybe ups the tension of the plot of an outsider unwittingly getting involved in some murder plot.

Welles' original cut of this film ran for over two hours.  I wonder if the full version fills in many of the gaps missing from this final cut. 

Too bad cut film wasn't saved back then.  We could have had so many director's cuts of so many classic films.

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Just as Address Unknown doesn't show the development of the Paul Lukas character into becoming a Nazi, He Walked by Night doesn't look for incidents or motivations to explain the Basehart character. Basehart has the good looks of a leading man, but he usually plays offbeat characters.

Well these were "B" films, of course no time for development, and then we are looking back on them with our "modern perspective" where everything needs to be explained, how characters get twisted because of childhood trauma/abuse etc., etc.,  That kind of crap adds at least a half hour to a lot of films nowadays.  Makes you wish  for the good old days.  

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Anyway watched

Gas-Oil aka Hi-Jack Highway (1955)  

Hi-Jack Highway Poster

Director: Gilles Grangier, with stars Jean Gabin, Jeanne Moreau, Gaby Basse, Simone Berthier, Charles Bouillaud, and Marcel Bozzuffi. 

 A nice French Noir story that can easily fit in with They Drive by Night (1940), Thieves' Highway (1949) Hell Drivers (1957) and The Long Haul (1957). It's about truck drivers on the haul between Paris and Auvergne in Central France.  A group of gangsters rob a  messenger service of a 50 million francs. They use two cars for the job one to block the messenger the other to block it from backing up. They gun down the guards and three men take off in one car in one direction while the driver of other car in the rear grabs the briefcase with the loot. He switches cars.  The first three gangsters wait at a rendezvous but the man with the loot never shows up.  He does show up on a dark rainy night when we see his body pushed from a car.

Jean Chape (Gabin) a trucker, after sleeping over at his gal pal Anne's house (Moreau) , gets in his truck and while  driving his route, runs over the body of the already dead gangster. He calls the police who immediately impound his truck.  Soon the widow of the dead man and his gangster buddies begin to harass Jean believing he has the stolen money.  Jean rallies his teamster buddies to deal with them. 7/10

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55 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Well these were "B" films, of course no time for development, and then we are looking back on them with our "modern perspective" where everything needs to be explained, how characters get twisted because of childhood trauma/abuse etc., etc.,  That kind of crap adds at least a half hour to a lot of films nowadays.  Makes you wish  for the good old days.  

Agreed! Giving an elaborate Freudian or PTSD explanation for the Basehart character would only detract from his actions. What we see is all we need to see for this film.

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Last night, after watching The Lady From Shanghai, I decided I was still in the mood for more Rita, so I watched Gilda.  I love Gilda, it's one of my favorite noir films.  Rita is particularly fantastic, and I even like Glenn Ford in this film.  I love Rita's costumes.

Anyway, I've already said in the past how I thought that the ending  was a bit of a cop-out, so I'm not going to dwell on that.

::SPOILERS::

I will say however, I think some of the drama of the film would have been better if they hadn't included the scene of Ballin being rescued in the ocean after he fakes his death.  I think they should have just shown the plane going down and cut away.  Then, when Ballin re-emerges later, it would be more dramatic.  Instead, we as the audience know that Ballin is still alive and we're just waiting for him to come back and go after Johnny.

::END::

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The Lady from Shanghai is one of those films I've seen a number of times, so if I'm in the mood I'll watch

it again, if not I won't. Last night I wasn't. Cry of the City was pretty good, nothing very original, but

well done. In Maltin's book, he or whoever wrote the entry said it was a rehash of Manhattan Melodrama.

Yeah, sort of, but it didn't have those dull flashbacks about how the bad kid shoplifts from the corner

drugstore and the good kid refuses to join in and so on. Yeah, we get it. Cry of the City just shows that

Mature has known Conte and his family for a long time. I was impressed by that one shot at the end

where we see the dead or near dead Conte holding the knife in his hand and not moving. 

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16 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Cry of the City was pretty good, nothing very original, but

well done. In Maltin's book, he or whoever wrote the entry said it was a rehash of Manhattan Melodrama.

Yeah, sort of, but it didn't have those dull flashbacks about how the bad kid shoplifts from the corner

drugstore and the good kid refuses to join in and so on. Yeah, we get it. Cry of the City just shows that

Mature has known Conte and his family for a long time. I was impressed by that one shot at the end

where we see the dead or near dead Conte holding the knife in his hand and not moving. 

Like Joe,  I'm really enjoy Cry of the City,  and as you note,  while nothing very original,  it was well done (on all levels;  direction,  acting,  photography,  score).

I really don't see much of the Manhattan Melodrama aspect since the detective wasn't a big-wig,  and they were never in love with the same gal. 

There is the Dead-End (Bogie, McCrea),   connection but mom,  doesn't reject her bad-boy until the end so. 

For me the films takes various themes from prior films and weaves them into a story that,   while seen before,   keep me interested into what was clearly a forgone conclusion. 

 

 

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