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32 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Well Robert Mitchum,  if one counts his small role in the DeNiro Cape Fear.

I though Dorothy Malone would qualify but she wasn't in a Transitional Noir.     I guess that would be another trivia question; someone that was in a classic-noir and a neo-noir but not in that middle period.

 

Yea Mitchum  there is still another

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13 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Yea Mitchum  there is still another

I need to take a break (ha ha);   At first I believed I had one in Eli Wallach,   but he is another actor that wasn't in a transitional noir.    That short time period (1960 - 1969) didn't contain many American noir films.     Wallach was in a neo-noir film made after 1990 that was a remake  (Night and the City,) of a classic noir.    I.e. there were more remakes of classic noirs after 1990 then there were during the transitional period.

 

 

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I think I've got it, CJ!

It wouldn't happen to be Fritz Feld, would it?

SURELY there had to be a role in each of these noir eras for a  guy who could play a head waiter and who could make that popping sound with his hands and mouth, RIGHT?!

(...okay okay, maybe not...never mind then)

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And now on a little more serious note here...

I'm thinkin' maybe either MY ol' buddy Kirk Douglas or HIS ol' buddy Burt Lancaster here?

(...well, this is certainly a better guess than Fritz Feld was anyway, ain't it?!!!)

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12 minutes ago, Dargo said:

And now on a little more serious note here...

I'm thinkin' maybe either MY ol' buddy Kirk Douglas or HIS ol' buddy Burt Lancaster here?

(...well, this is certainly a better guess than Fritz Feld was anyway, ain't it?!!!)

I checked Douglas and he doesn't qualify since he wasn't in a transitional noir during 1960 - 1969,  unless one wishes to count the John Huston film The List of Adrian Messenger.

As for Lancaster;  He didn't make any films after 1989. 

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45 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I need to take a break (ha ha);   At first I believed I had one in Eli Wallach,   but he is another actor that wasn't in a transitional noir.    That short time period (1960 - 1969) didn't contain many American noir films.     Wallach was in a neo-noir film made after 1990 that was a remake  (Night and the City,) of a classic noir.    I.e. there were more remakes of classic noirs after 1990 then there were during the transitional period.

 

 

 

31 minutes ago, Dargo said:

I think I've got it, CJ!

It wouldn't happen to be Fritz Feld, would it?

SURELY there had to be a role in each of these noir eras for a  guy who could play a head waiter and who could make that popping sound with his hands and mouth, RIGHT?!

(...okay okay, maybe not...never mind then)

It's Robert Blake hes in  (The Woman in the Window (Dickie Wanley ), Black Hand (he's the Naples bus boy), Rumble on the Docks (Chuck), The Tijuana Story (Enrique Acosta Mesa) Revolt in the Big House ( Rudy Hernandez), Transitional Noir (In Cold Blood), and two Neo Noirst early  Film Soleil Neo Noir(Electra Glide In Blue) Johnny Wintergreen and his last film as the Mystery Man in (Lost Highway) 

You an also look at The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre  (he's the kid selling the lottery tickets) a Noir Western (especially the Tampico Sequence) There may be more between 1970 and 1990 I haven't seen all his films.

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16 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

It's Robert Blake... and his last film as the Mystery Man in (Lost Highway) 

Aaah, thanks CJ.

BUT, let us not forget that just a few short years after his last stint IN FRONT of the camera, little Bobby would have his own little "noir" saga play out within the halls of the Superior Court of Los Angeles California!

(...and in true NEO noir form, he got away with it!!!)

LOL

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31 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

 

It's Robert Blake hes in  (The Woman in the Window (Dickie Wanley ), Black Hand (he's the Naples bus boy), Rumble on the Docks (Chuck), The Tijuana Story (Enrique Acosta Mesa) Revolt in the Big House ( Rudy Hernandez), Transitional Noir (In Cold Blood), and two Neo Noirst early  Film Soleil Neo Noir(Electra Glide In Blue) Johnny Wintergreen and his last film as the Mystery Man in (Lost Highway) 

You an also look at The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre  (he's the kid selling the lottery tickets) a Noir Western (especially the Tampico Sequence) There may be more between 1970 and 1990 I haven't seen all his films.

Ah,   another actor that started out as a child;   I should of guessed Blake after I thought of Stockwell. 

 

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On 4/21/2020 at 9:29 AM, cigarjoe said:

Which reinforces my theory - that we get imprinted by that first exposure and that it colors all subsequent experiences.

My example is the Lucky Charms Leprechaun commercial. Saw that as a kid first then subsequently I can't take the Irish brogue accents of  Barry Fitzgerald in anything or Orson Welles in Lady From Shanghai, lol.

Too bad, joe, since those aren't proper, real Irish accents.  Ok, I guess Barry Fitzgerald.  Also that actor John Ford liked so much, Victor McLaglen  (who wasn't even Irish, he was English.)   But as I've said,  the way real Irish people talk doesn't sound much like that Lucky Charms leprechaun at all. 

....although, come to think of it,   I kind of remember that ad with fondness. Remember "yellow moons, green four-leaf clovers, orange stars, pink hearts"...  And remember "Trix are for kids"?  I always thought that was so unfair to that poor rabbit. There was also "Cuckoo  for Cocoa Puffs".  Oh, and what about Captain Crunch?       Good lord, you've really set me off here. Nostalgia for breakfast cereals of the past.

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

OK so here is a Noir trivia question.  But first let me set it up.  

Classic Noir - 1940-ish to 1959-ish

Transitional Noir -1960 - 1969

Neo Noir  ( early  late)- 1990 to present

Which actor-s had performances  in all three? Classic Noir,  Transitional Noir,  and late Neo Noir.

Robert Mitchum?

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20 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Robert Mitchum?

Correct,  but already stated.     Other ones were Dean Stockwell and Robert Blake;  Child actors that made movies over many decades. 

 

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2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Too bad, joe, since those aren't proper, real Irish accents.  Ok, I guess Barry Fitzgerald.  Also that actor John Ford liked so much, Victor McLaglen  (who wasn't even Irish, he was English.)   But as I've said,  the way real Irish people talk doesn't sound much like that Lucky Charms leprechaun at all. 

....although, come to think of it,   I kind of remember that ad with fondness. Remember "yellow moons, green four-leaf clovers, orange stars, pink hearts"...)  And remember "Trix are for kids"?  I always thought that was so unfair to that poor rabbit. There was also "Cuckoo  for Cocoa Puffs".  Oh, and what about Captain Crunch?       Good lord, you've really set me off here. Nostalgia for breakfast cereals of the past.

I always felt bad for the Trix rabbit.  Just give him some cereal already.

I've never been a fan of Lucky Charms.   But I did like the jingle.  I remember the commercials.  They aired during the Saturday Morning cartoons.  I remember for awhile, they kept adding more and more shapes.  As the shapes were added, the jingle changed. At one point, the jingle was: "Hearts stars and horseshoes, clovers and blue moons, pots of gold and rainbows, and tasty red balloons!  Despite the catchy jingle, I never found Lucky Charms to be "magically delicious."  I didn't like the marshmallows.

I was never a fan of "Cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs. " I also didn't care for Cooooooookie Crisp! I liked Trix.  I liked it back it the day when all the Trix were the same shape.  I also enjoyed Froot Loops. One of my favorites was Berry Berry Kix which seems to have disappeared.   Cap'n Crunch ("You and the Cap'N make it happen") w/ Crunch Berries was also a favorite, except it ripped up the roof of my mouth.  Frosted Flakes were hardly grrrrrreat. 

I never buy the crappy sugar cereal--except for Cinnamon Toast Crunch which I love. But that's more of a treat, rather than a good breakfast. 

But I digress.

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Watching The Postman Always Rings Twice and the icon scene where Lana Turner drops her lipstick and it rolls across the floor. The Garfield looks from it to Turner's shoes that up to her knees. Well is it just me or does she have really bony knees? lol

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9 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Watching The Postman Always Rings Twice and the icon scene where Lana Turner drops her lipstick and it rolls across the floor. The Garfield looks from it to Turner's shoes that up to her knees. Well is it just me or does she have really bony knees? lol

Yea,  they are kind of bony,,, but I admit that isn't what I'm focused on.

 

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A fine noir on Sunday night:    House of Bamboo.      

One Robert Ryan film TCM will be showing is House of Bamboo.   This 20th Century foreign noir film has a fine cast,  with top notch Japaneses actors.    Ryan plays a character named Sandy Dawson.      I don't wish to give the plot away but Sandy's love interest in this film are all over the map.

Li Xianglan.jpgRobert Stack - still.jpg

HOUSE OF BAMBOO is airing on TCM this Sunday evening. That's tomorrow night.

It's part of a theme called Tokyo Crime.

Screen Shot 2020-04-25 at 10.48.52 AM.png

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1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I guess no Eddie Muller and Noir Alley tonight?     

Why do you say that? It looks like Wicked Woman (1954) is on tonight and tomorrow. The only difference is that Saturday's showing starts 15 minutes later than usual due to the Bogdanovich stuff running long.

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6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Why do you say that? It looks like Wicked Woman (1954) is on tonight and tomorrow. The only difference is that Saturday's showing starts 15 minutes later than usual due to the Bogdanovich stuff running long.

I was looking at Sunday's schedule!!!    Thanks for pointing this  out.     Either way if you haven't see Robert  Ryan and House of Bamboo,  I highly recommend it (that is Sunday night).

PS:  Wicked Woman's best performance is by Percy Helton.   The iconic noir actor. 

(hey,  I'm pulling a fast on on Sepia,  here,  who claimed Helton wasn't in many noir film before cigarjoe had to put him in his place(ha  ha).

 

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35 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yea,  they are kind of bony,,, but I admit that isn't what I'm focused on.

 

Exactly, people were focusing on her legs and her sun suit outfit  Must have been a big deal back then it just another illustration of how times have changed.  This is also a good reason for TCM to continue too keep showing how things like sexuality and story-lines were evolving through the 60s 70s 80s 90s etc., etc. Times have changed  sine the end of the 50s 

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2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I was looking at Sunday's schedule!!!    Thanks for pointing this  out.     Either way if you haven't see Robert  Ryan and House of Bamboo,  I highly recommend it (that is Sunday night).

 

Yea House of Bamboo  is great

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1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I was looking at Sunday's schedule!!!    Thanks for pointing this  out.     Either way if you haven't see Robert  Ryan and House of Bamboo,  I highly recommend it (that is Sunday night).

 

House of Bamboo is enjoyable. I wasn't crazy about Tokyo Joe. They do continue the Japanese crime theme with the TCM Imports film Fireworks. I like that movie a lot, but it may be too offbeat and slow for many viewers.

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I hear ya.   The first time I saw The Big Sleep with my wife she said 'hey that gals legs are kind of chunky'.      I just ignored her.    Of course I have seen the film in the theater many times before I meet my wife.   Once I sat in the very front row.     That hurts one's eyes,  but Martha was as large as life itself!

 

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3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

House of Bamboo is enjoyable. I wasn't crazy about Tokyo Joe. They do continue the Japanese crime theme with the TCM Imports film Fireworks. I like that movie a lot, but it may be too offbeat and slow for many viewers.

Yea,  Bogie was a little too old for his role in Tokyo Joe and the romantic angle falls flat (since I find Alexander Knox boring in most things except Wilson,  were he was a good match for the character).    Best thing about the film are the Japanese actors,   Bogie's friend,  and of course the river-man,   Sessue Hayakawa.

 

 

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32 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I hear ya.   The first time I saw The Big Sleep with my wife she said 'hey that gals legs are kind of chunky'.      I just ignored her.    Of course I have seen the film in the theater many times before I meet my wife.   Once I sat in the very front row.     That hurts one's eyes,  but Martha was as large as life itself!

 

Well, I don't know what your wife's idea of shapely legs might be, but Martha Vickers' legs in that scene are just fine, not a bit "chunky".  Maybe your wife admires toothpicks.

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