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Regarding the TZ episode, doesn't it come from Dead of Night (also Room for One More)?  There is a dummy and ventriloquist in Dead of Night (multiple storylines and great ending).  The ventriloquist was played by (I think) Michael Redgrave.

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3 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

How about Pitfall?  

"

Good one...although the kid doesn't really come into it all that much, he's more  just packaged in, so to speak, with the wife (Jane Wyatt) to show that Dick is a family man and as such should live up to wife--and son's --expectations.

Some other "father" themed noirs  (or semi-noirs, not everyone would agree all of these are noirs; but we've been down that road many times...)

Some of these have been shown on Noir Alley:

"High Wall" : Robert Taylor and Audrey Taylor in an unusual noir concerning a returned WW ll vet with a head injury and a dead wife.  He 's motivated to clear his name on the dead wife allegations because he has a young son he's anxious to get back to and, well ,  be a good father to.

"Talk about a Stranger": George Murphy plays a firm but understanding dad who has to deal with his angry and grief-stricken son when the kid's dog gets mysteriously poisoned and dies.

"The Big Heat":  Glenn Ford is a family man with a little daughter he needs to protect from the bad guys--however, this is not the main plot of this noir.

"The Big Night":  Eddie just showed this one on Noir Alley a few months ago.  John Barrymore Jr. is a young, insecure teen who sees his father humiliated and sets out to avenge him.

"The Window":  a kid witnesses a murder, but of course nobody believes him, including his parents.  The dad tries to convince his son to tell the police he was lying; suspenseful and kind of sad.

"Cape Fear":  pick the original or the remake--they're both good, but I prefer the original--they're the same story, both about a father whose family is threatened by a sadistic killer out for revenge. The father has to keep his wife and daughter safe from this maniac. (The remake includes a queasy scene between the killer and the man's daughter,  sexual innuendo not seen much in the original.)

TWO with Richard Conte:  : " Thieves' Highway", in which Conte returns from the war to discover his father's been disabled and confined to a wheelchair as a result of nasty thugs who want to take over the dad's fruit seller's business. The father doesn't come into it after the first 20 minutes or so, but Conte's love for his father is what drives  (no pun intended) the rest of the narrative.

The other Richard Conte noir with a father theme is "House of Strangers", more a family drama than a noir, all about Edward G. Robinson as the remote, domineering father of a family of adult sons. Conte's the smartest of them.

Speaking of Edward G. Robinson, I'll give honourable mention to "Double Indemnity".  Although Edward G. is not Fred MacMurray's biological father,  he serves as a kind of father figure to MacMurray's character--I think he even says as much at some point in the film.

Probably lots of others, but let's face it...daddydom is not a very noirish theme.  "Underworld USA" works a a "father" themed noir because it's full of revenge and bitterness, not at all heart-warming.  Of course, as I said earlier, I think it would have helped to have had just one scene showing Tolly and his dad together before the dad was killed.

 

 

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7 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Regarding the TZ episode, doesn't it come from Dead of Night (also Room for One More)?  There is a dummy and ventriloquist in Dead of Night (multiple storylines and great ending).  The ventriloquist was played by (I think) Michael Redgrave.

Those two episodes of the TZ are similar to two segments of Dead of Night, especially the one about the

living dummy. I don't know if TZ credited the original writers or not. I always thought the spookiest 

segment of Dead of Night was the one with Sally Ann Howes about the Christmas party and the boy

from the past. 

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On 6/23/2020 at 4:51 PM, chaya bat woof woof said:

There are probably better noir films to show on Father's Day. 

 

19 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

How about Pitfall?  

Pitfall3.jpg

A better Noir one is..... 

 Poster.jpg

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

 

A better Noir one is..... 

 Poster.jpg

 

Right, I actually mention "The Window" in an extensive post I wrote right after the one you responded to,  taking some time and effort to think of father-related noirs.  It was a relatively longish list,  all of which I thought of on my own--didn't "google" anything .   Just a bit disappointing to do that and get crickets, while a post that listed one film got a response.

Ok, I know how grouchy and egotistical that sounds.  But I do sometimes wonder how things work on these threads.  Guess it's time for me to get some coffee.

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41 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

 

Right, I actually mention "The Window" in an extensive post I wrote right after the one you responded to,  taking some time and effort to think of father-related noirs.  It was a relatively longish list,  all of which I thought of on my own--didn't "google" anything .   Just a bit disappointing to do that and get crickets, while a post that listed one film got a response.

Ok, I know how grouchy and egotistical that sounds.  But I do sometimes wonder how things work on these threads.  Guess it's time for me to get some coffee.

My fault I saw the Pitfall response to the Woof Woof post and just posted my first response with The Window. When you do that it jumps the page to last post, didn't see your post misswonderly3 and I apologize for the crickets. 😎 

Cape Fear and House Of Strangers are good ones also.

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So then we're talkin' movies where fathers protect their families and attempt to fend off the menacing antics of crazed lawbreaking individuals here, are we?!

So then how about THIS one...

hqdefault.jpg

                                                        Hot Rods to Hell

(...what?...you say that this isn't a "noir"?...well, it stars that stalwart of noir Dana Andrews here, now doesn't it???)  ;)

 

 

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1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Has anyone ever seen The Fallen Idol (TCM used to show it)?

I have seen it a few  times and always on TCM.     Fine film with Ralph Richardson solid in this film with a paranoia theme. 

The Fallen Idol (1948) – The Motion Pictures

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2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I have seen it a few  times and always on TCM.     Fine film with Ralph Richardson solid in this film with a paranoia theme. 

The Fallen Idol (1948) – The Motion Pictures

What? And no mention of those fabulous cheekbones that Michele Morgan is sportin' there, dude???!!!  ;)

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

My fault I saw the Pitfall response to the Woof Woof post and just posted my first response with The Window. When you do that it jumps the page to last post, didn't see your post misswonderly3 and I apologize for the crickets. 😎 

Cape Fear and House Of Strangers are good ones also.

cigarjoe, I gave you a "sad" emoji because I'm sad  (or sorry, anyway) that I kind of lashed out at you like that.  I should have known you just didn't see my post. And for that matter, I myself have often quoted someone right after I've read their post, without scrolling any further;  sometimes another poster has commented extensively on the topic and it must look like I just ignored them, when in fact, like you, I just did not see their post.  Stuff happens, we can't be expected always to read every single post on a thread, and I apologize for my (hopefully minor) hissy fit.  😎  right back at ya !

ps:  although I can't resist saying that I did mention both "Cape Fear" and "House of Strangers" in my list.  😏

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5 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

cigarjoe, I gave you a "sad" emoji because I'm sad  (or sorry, anyway) that I kind of lashed out at you like that.  I should have known you just didn't see my post. And for that matter, I myself have often quoted someone right after I've read their post, without scrolling any further;  sometimes another poster has commented extensively on the topic and it must look like I just ignored them, when in fact, like you, I just did not see their post.  Stuff happens, we can't be expected always to read every single post on a thread, and I apologize for my (hopefully minor) hissy fit.  😎  right back at ya !

ps:  although I can't resist saying that I did mention both "Cape Fear" and "House of Strangers" in my list.  😏

C'mon now, MissW. Don't you know...

tenor.gif

(...but of course in YOUR case, that should be, "Never apologize MADAM, etc, etc, etc)

;)

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1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Has anyone ever seen The Fallen Idol (TCM used to show it)?

Yes, I've seen it. In fact, I own it--although maybe that doesn't count, because I only "own" it on a homemade videotape.

Are you suggesting it's a "father" themed noir?  I'm not sure I'd call it a noir, although I can see the argument for it. ( a "child" -related noir, I suppose...)  Also, maybe this is a technicality,  but the man the kid in that film hero-worships is not his father, it's the family butler.  However,  I'd certainly agree that the Ralph Richardson character is a father-figure to the boy.  It's a very good film; can't go wrong with Carol Reed, especially with Ralph Richardson and Jack Hawkins in there too.

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Just now, Dargo said:

C'mon now, MissW. Don't you know...

tenor.gif

(...but of course in YOUR case, that should be, "Never apologize MADAM, etc, etc, etc)

;)

I always disagreed with that famous "Yellow Ribbon" line; in fact, I think being able to apologize is a sign of strength.  (but not always....in the case of my apology to cigarjoe, it was just a sign that I recognized I was being snippy to someone here I like.)

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1 minute ago, misswonderly3 said:

I always disagreed with that famous "Yellow Ribbon" line; in fact, I think being able to apologize is a sign of strength.  (but not always....in the case of my apology to cigarjoe, it was just a sign that I recognized I was being snippy to someone here I like.)

I also always have...disagreed with the big lug's line up there this is, and absolutely agree with your take on this. I of course just offered that up for a little laugh.

(...but as I'm sure you know, that very philosophy, especially down here south of the 49th, seems to be all the rage of late and is so often exemplified by...well, I better not finish this sentence here, huh)  ;)

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4 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

ps:  although I can't resist saying that I did mention both "Cape Fear" and "House of Strangers" in my list.  😏

I was agreeing with your post when I mentioned them , I guess I should have quoted you so you would know.

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7 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Has anyone ever seen The Fallen Idol (TCM used to show it)?

Sometimes if I know there is going to be a movie with a child actor in it, I almost wince, especially if it is acclaimed. Not sure what's going on with that. Maybe I don't like seeing children manipulated in that way on screen. (Gosh, maybe I should revise that sentence. But you know what I mean.) However, I was totally captivated with this one. Carol Reed has been attributed with an astute method indeed in getting this little boy to "act" in a way he wanted him to in the story. If that kid was really an accomplished actor, then this is a brilliant performance... but that doesn't quite signify. But it is brilliant nonetheless.

 

bvSh5Y7.jpg

This is what it looks like to behold a fallen idol fallen

Here is another, and there are at least two or more views of this telling moment.

Wr2D0PY.jpg

Watching this kid throughout is a cinematic delight.

I think I read that he never made another movie.

///

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I just saw another film noir with an excellent performance by a child in the leading role--Hayley Mills in Tiger Bay. I've very glad that TCM was able to show this film. A girl in a poor area of Cardiff protects a handsome young sailor (Horst Buchholtz) from the police who want him for questioning in connection with the murder of his former girlfriend. Excellent performances by all concerned, including John Mills as the policeman in charge and Megs Jenkins as the girl's aunt. A well-written script, with fine direction by J. Lee Thompson (look at some of the camera set-ups, for instance), some noir styling in the cinematography, and an always believable portrayal of the sudden crush that a child can get on an adult. However, the film wouldn't work without Hayley Mills, who seems to have the reactions of an actual child and the subtlety of an adult actor.

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Regarding the Father's Day theme on which I'm a bit late, has anyone mentioned SHADOW ON THE WALL (1950), a film that Eddie showed a while back?

If I remember correctly, Zachary Scott is the father of a young girl, Gigi Perreau, who has psychological problems after witnessing a murder, of which her father is accused.  Nancy Davis (Reagan) is a psychiatrist who helps the young girl remember what happened.

And let me agree heartily in endorsing THE FALLEN IDOL.  Ralph Richardson, Michele Morgan, and child actor Bobby Henrey are all brilliant, and this first teaming of author Graham Greene and director Carol Reed (who also worked together on THE THIRD MAN and OUR MAN IN HAVANA) produces a great movie.  THE FALLEN IDOL is one of my wife's very favorites, so we've watched it several times.  (Several years ago, through a happy coincidence, Criterion released the movie on DVD at almost the same time that I found an original FALLEN IDOL poster -- both of which then became Christmas presents for my wife.)

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18 hours ago, laffite said:

Sometimes if I know there is going to be a movie with a child actor in it, I almost wince, especially if it is acclaimed. Not sure what's going on with that. Maybe I don't like seeing children manipulated in that way on screen. (Gosh, maybe I should revise that sentence. But you know what I mean.) However, I was totally captivated with this one. Carol Reed has been attributed with an astute method indeed in getting this little boy to "act" in a way he wanted him to in the story. If that kid was really an accomplished actor, then this is a brilliant performance... but that doesn't quite signify. But it is brilliant nonetheless.

 

bvSh5Y7.jpg

This is what it looks like to behold a fallen idol fallen

Here is another, and there are at least two or more views of this telling moment.

Wr2D0PY.jpg

Watching this kid throughout is a cinematic delight.

I think I read that he never made another movie.

///

For a moment I had the kid in "Fallen Idol" mixed up with the boy in "The Rocking Horse Winner".  But no, they're two different actors  (Bobby Henrey as Phillipe in "Fallen Idol", and John Howard Davies as Paul in "The Rocking Horse Winner".)  The boys were the same age  (both born in 1939), and kind of look alike, both having that sort of innocent English-looking face and blond hair.

But you're right, Henrey doesn't seem to have been in anything much else, while Davies was in at least one other famous British film, "Oliver Twist" , where he played the eponymous main character.

Anyway,  it might be interesting for TCM to air these two films as a double bill some evening.  Both involve young impressionable  upper-class boys who befriend the family servant, and both explore the consequences of what happens when childhood innocence collides with adult inequities.

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1 hour ago, BingFan said:

Regarding the Father's Day theme on which I'm a bit late, has anyone mentioned SHADOW ON THE WALL (1950), a film that Eddie showed a while back?

If I remember correctly, Zachary Scott is the father of a young girl, Gigi Perreau, who has psychological problems after witnessing a murder, of which her father is accused.  Nancy Davis (Reagan) is a psychiatrist who helps the young girl remember what happened....

 

Good one, Bing ! Of course !  "Shadow on the Wall" is all about the father-child relationship, and a noir to boot.  And yes, I remember Eddie showed it on Noir Alley, a year or so ago.  Wish I'd thought of that one for my list !

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