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Noir Alley

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14 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Anybody ever hear of this film ?. Its been called a Noir by some. 

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Yes, I saw it. Set in the turn of the century Russia, Darnell plays a peasant girl who uses her good looks to try to get ahead, while George Sanders plays a respected judge who hates himself for becoming obsessed with her. In the "You've Got To Be Kidding Me" category Sig Ruman (with scruffy beard and badly in need of a bath) plays Darnell's father. It's an okay film, the first time that Darnell played a schemer, I believe. I don't recall Darnell ever dressing as provocatively in the film as she does in the poster.

Is it "noir?" Well there's a murder and an innocent person convicted so I guess some might say this costume drama has elements of it. Interestingly this is the one time I know of in which Sanders played a Russian, his real nationality.

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3 hours ago, Dargo said:

I do remember that my very first baseball glove was a Larry Sherry signature model, and who I'm sure you know was the MVP of the '59 World Series for the winning Dodger team that year.

Another agonizing baseball memory. As you may know, the dodgers won a 2 out of 3 playoff to go to the Series, sending my Braves to defeat. I did my paper route in a record 12 minutes to get home and see the end. Bob Rush threw a wild pitch in the 12th inning, I think. Or was it Felix Mantilla throwing the ball away, allowing the winning run. Waaah!

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On 7/13/2020 at 8:46 PM, lavenderblue19 said:

Yes, you missed what happened in the beginning and no that was not Borden;s first appearance slumped over in the car. Borden was the police Lt. Tierney reported to. In the beginning, Borden gets Tierney fired. Borden was Tierney's boss. Borden was on the take. He was also blackmailing the meat packer's owner nephew because he knew that they had killed the meat inspector and Bordon said it was an accident.
The film starts with Tierney getting fired and punching Borden in the face in Borden's office.  Borden balled Tierney out for ruining what was going to be a raid on a gambling place.They framed Tierney for Bordon's murder because they knew Borden had fired him so he was the perfect patsy.

Thanks - I did go back to the beginning, but guess I didn't catch his name.

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Yes, I saw it. Set in the turn of the century Russia, Darnell plays a peasant girl who uses her good looks to try to get ahead, while George Sanders plays a respected judge who hates himself for becoming obsessed with her. In the "You've Got To Be Kidding Me" category Sig Ruman (with scruffy beard and badly in need of a bath) plays Darnell's father. It's an okay film, the first time that Darnell played a schemer, I believe. I don't recall Darnell ever dressing as provocatively in the film as she does in the poster.

Is it "noir?" Well there's a murder and an innocent person convicted so I guess some might say this costume drama has elements of it. Interestingly this is the one time I know of in which Sanders played a Russian, his real nationality.

After checking for some additional Google images of Summer Storm, it appears Darnell was at least in one scene dressed as provocatively as in that poster, Tom...

c20c5e7c7b9a622e86414aa3f87dc60b.jpg

And, ya gotta wonder if perhaps they got the idea for this from another movie that had been released just a year earlier. YOU know, that one which first brought Jane Russell into the public eye...

OIP._9btqJpkO5Wv9lXn0c1laQHaFp?pid=Api&r

 

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4 hours ago, Dargo said:

107902800_10158212303148930_509536491603

After checking for some additional Google images of Summer Storm, it appears Darnell was at least in one scene dressed as provocatively as in that poster, Tom...

c20c5e7c7b9a622e86414aa3f87dc60b.jpg

And, ya gotta wonder if perhaps they got the idea for this from another movie that had been released just a year earlier. YOU know, that one which first brought Jane Russell into the public eye...

OIP._9btqJpkO5Wv9lXn0c1laQHaFp?pid=Api&r

 

Very perceptive of you, Dargo. Unfortunately, that photo appears to be an Outlaw inspired publicity pose for Summer Storm. There are no barns nor even a single strand of hay to be found in the film nor, alas, provocative poses like this by Linda Darnell. This film does have bits of humour in it, though, as Edward Everett Horton has a key role as a count (who also takes an interest in Darnell), and then you have grizzly Sig Ruman, looking like soap is clearly a foreign substance to him, getting a high society matron a little freaky when he leans over towards her to ask her if she is married.

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5 hours ago, Dargo said:

And, ya gotta wonder if perhaps they got the idea for this from another movie that had been released just a year earlier. YOU know, that one which first brought Jane Russell into the public eye...

I see your points..... 😎

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On 7/13/2020 at 4:55 PM, Hibi said:

I thought Bodyguard was ok, but why was it so short? My cable guide had it running for 90 mins and it turned out to be barely an hour! Was a bit disconcerting seeing Tierney as a good guy (though I did see one other film where he was a good guy). Poor Priscilla Lane. Probably a good idea to retire after this film......I wonder what she thought of Tierney? LOL.

She probably retired because of working with Tierney LOL. She was a sweet, lovely actress, too bad she retired early. So funny in Arsenic and Old Lace and very touching in the 4 Daughters films.

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3 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

She probably retired because of working with Tierney LOL. She was a sweet, lovely actress, too bad she retired early. So funny in Arsenic and Old Lace and very touching in the 4 Daughters films.

I looked her up as I didnt know much about her. She decided to retire to concentrate on her family. She had remarried and started having children, her husband had relocated to the east for his job. She said she had no regrets.

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54 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I looked her up as I didnt know much about her. She decided to retire to concentrate on her family. She had remarried and started having children, her husband had relocated to the east for his job. She said she had no regrets.

Priscilla Lane also had a lot of nephews and nieces,   the birthday parties keep her very busy!   But seriously,   the Lane sisters were  busy in the 30s but with WWII and the studios making less films per year and not re-signing talent as frequency as they did during the 30s,  the work just wasn't there.      

Lola Lane made her last firm in 1946,  They Made Me a Killer and Rosemary Lane (who like Priscilla was under a 7 year contract for WB),  made her last film,   Sing Me a Song of Texas in 1945.

Thus as one can see all of them didn't do much during the later years of the WWII,  had children,  and once the war was over didn't return to pursue a professional career.  But based on what I could find they had no regrets  (which of course is what is really important).

300px-Four_Daughters_Warner_Bros.jpg

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4 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

She probably retired because of working with Tierney LOL. She was a sweet, lovely actress, too bad she retired early. So funny in Arsenic and Old Lace and very touching in the 4 Daughters films.

She was also memorable as James Cagney's would-be love interest in THE ROARING TWENTIES.

Happy to hear that she had a happy and satisfying family life away from Hollywood.

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On 7/14/2020 at 8:26 AM, cigarjoe said:

Anybody ever hear of this film ?. Its been called a Noir by some. 

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I've seen it. It's based on Anton Chekov's novel The Shooting Party, from the late 1880s. The screenplay is reframed to set the plot in post-Revolutionary Russia - but it's a class-system melodrama, not a noir.

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On 7/14/2020 at 1:40 PM, Hibi said:

I guess I'm in the minority here, but I dont care for 3 Strangers, so I'll skip it. Might record it for Eddie's comments.

I'm used to being in the minority a lot of the time, when it comes to liking or disliking noirs.

Hibi, if you don't mind,  AFTER the airing of Three Strangers (maybe after the second airing so no spoilers)  would you consider briefly talking about why you don't like the film? I always worry that people will think I'm being "challenging"  (as in,  "what's the matter with you? Why don't you like what I like?    'Splain."  )   But I don't mean it in an argumentative or judgemental way,   I'm just interested in why people like or don't like a movie, especially when their view differs from mine.  Just so I can get a different point-of-view, not to demand that people "justify"  why they like or dislike something.

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I didn't hate it, but I wasn't that impressed with it either. I've seen it several times, and didn't like it enough to see it another. I don't really care for Geraldine Fitzgerald either (at least in leading roles) it's been awhile since I saw it last, so I can't go into details why. Just not something I want to see again.

 

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On 7/13/2020 at 2:22 PM, SadPanda said:

Bosley Crowther wrote of the Three Strangers, "Duplicities and violences complicate their lots, but Fate—that inscrutable mystery—deals the final blow. Such is the theme of the story, and the action which bears it out is full-bodied melodrama of a shrewd and sophisticated sort"

Sounds not too bad.

I’m not saying this is one of those cases but, I often read snippets of reviews of certain films by Bosley Crowther on their Wikipedia pages and I am really, really surprised by how often he completely missed the boat.

He was, in many ways, the Leonard Maltin of his time. Although [insofar as I know]  at least Bosley wrote his own reviews.

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54 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I’m not saying this is one of those cases but, I often read snippets of reviews of certain films by Bosley Crowther on their Wikipedia pages and I am really, really surprised by how often he completely missed the boat.

He was, in many ways, the Leonard Maltin of his time. Although [insofar as I know]  at least Bosley wrote his own reviews.

I was surprised some time ago to note that he completely panned Murial (1963) and I remember feeling puffed up vindicated because I didn't like either and i though he was right on. I didn't like it because I wasn't comfortable with it (not understanding to my satisfaction) and I wonder if he felt the same in some way. I have since seen and liked it. The sense of time and memory wherein an old friend reunites with a lady acquaintance of many years ago. At one point she says, "You mean if I had telephoned that day, we would have gone to Monte Carlo." (sample of the idea), I don't think the lady knew whether she was or was not in love with him now, but the fascination of what could have been, based on some trifle event, might have united them a long time ago fascinated her. The movie is more than that (I want to see it again now) and I was smitten with the performance of Delphine Seyrig, with her way of scurrying around trying to hold herself together, and her troubled mind about the past. I was shocked that a movie critic from the NYT would so offhandedly dismiss a potential classic from a highly respected director (Resnais).
 

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18 minutes ago, laffite said:

I was surprised some time ago to note that he completely panned Murial (1963) and I remember feeling puffed up vindicated because I didn't like either and i though he was right on. I didn't like it because I wasn't comfortable with it (not understanding to my satisfaction) and I wonder if he felt the same in some way. I have since seen and liked it. The sense of time and memory wherein an old friend reunites with a lady acquaintance of many years ago. At one point she says, "You mean if I had telephoned that day, we would have gone to Monte Carlo." (sample of the idea), I don't think the lady knew whether she was or was not in love with him now, but the fascination of what could have been, based on some trifle event, might have united them a long time ago fascinated her. The movie is more than that (I want to see it again now) and I was smitten with the performance of Delphine Seyrig, with her way of scurrying around trying to hold herself together, and her troubled mind about the past. I was shocked that a movie critic from the NYT would so offhandedly dismissed a potential classic from a highly respected director (Resnais).
 

If I remember correctly, and I do not always remember correctly, Bosley Crowther was forced to step down from his position as the chief reviewer for the NYT when he panned BONNIE AND CLYDE in 1967, it was kind of a major moment in film criticism. 

ETA: Wow, I just went to Wikipedia and for once I remembered the details pretty accurately!!
By the way it’s really hard to look up Bosley Crowthers Wikipedia page because my auto correct kept wanting to change his name to Boston or Bosnia Crowing/Crowded. I just about tossed the phone across the room.

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I’m not saying this is one of those cases but, I often read snippets of reviews of certain films by Bosley Crowther on their Wikipedia pages and I am really, really surprised by how often he completely missed the boat.

Well, you know what they say opinions are like.

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18 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I'm used to being in the minority a lot of the time, when it comes to liking or disliking noirs.

Hibi, if you don't mind,  AFTER the airing of Three Strangers (maybe after the second airing so no spoilers)  would you consider briefly talking about why you don't like the film? I always worry that people will think I'm being "challenging"  (as in,  "what's the matter with you? Why don't you like what I like?    'Splain."  )   But I don't mean it in an argumentative or judgemental way,   I'm just interested in why people like or don't like a movie, especially when their view differs from mine.  Just so I can get a different point-of-view, not to demand that people "justify"  why they like or dislike something.

Geez, MissW! Could you BE any more Canadian here???!!!

LOL

(...jus' kiddin'...couldn't resist)  ;)

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

If I remember correctly, and I do not always remember correctly, Bosley Crowther was forced to step down from his position as the chief reviewer for the NYT when he panned BONNIE AND CLYDE in 1967, it was kind of a major moment in film criticism. 

ETA: Wow, I just went to Wikipedia and for once I remembered the details pretty accurately!!
By the way it’s really hard to look up Bosley Crowthers Wikipedia page because my auto correct kept wanting to change his name to Boston or Bosnia Crowing/Crowded. I just about tossed the phone across the room.

Yep, he was forced off the Times. His replacement, Renata Adler, only lasted a year. Vincent Canby lasted a good while after her. Didnt like any of them.

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

Geez, MissW! Could you BE more Canadian???!!!

They're so vicious, aren't they?

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3 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Yep, he was forced off the Times. His replacement, Renata Adler, only lasted a year. Vincent Canby lasted a good while after her. Didnt like any of them.

I wouldn't pay any critic as much as a nickel for their opinion.

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8 hours ago, SadPanda said:

I wouldn't pay any critic as much as a nickel for their opinion.

So agree with this assessment because 90 percent of the time when they loathe a movie I know I will enjoy it tremendously, likewise when they rave over a certain movie, with a few exceptions, I usually end up finding the film mediocre at best.

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12 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

So agree with this assessment because 90 percent of the time when they loathe a movie I know I will enjoy it tremendously, likewise when they rave over a certain movie, with a few exceptions, I usually end up finding the film mediocre at best.

Not to mention that they ruin people's work - sometimes their lives - with their damned "opinions".

All the while they produce absolutely nothing for anybody whatsoever - just sit on their butts and judge. Scores of people work hard to produce a movie for our entertainment and even, sometimes, our edification - writers, actors, technicians of all manner - and some critic, having done nothing useful whatsoever - can trash their work into failure with some cheap, self-important faultfinding.

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I'm not too surprised that an old Ivy Leaguer with the name of Bosley was something of a

stick in the mud as the 1960s came into view. But he is entitled to his opinion and had

experience in film reviewing. The Bos also championed foreign films back in the day, so

that's a positive. Crowther was before my time, but I do remember Vincent Canby, who

did the grunt work of film reviews for the Times for a long time. Of course I don't recall

his reviews of individual films, but I'd day he was more open to new things than the Bos

and often took a witty, light-hearted approach to his work. While it's interesting to read

film criticism, I would never take their word for any film before seeing it for myself. 

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10 hours ago, Vautrin said:

While it's interesting to read film criticism, I would never take their word for any film before seeing it for myself. 

After I've seen a movie, it's then that I sometimes read their opinions.

I don't want to be influenced in any way at all before I see the movie. 

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