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On 8/13/2020 at 3:40 PM, Dargo said:

cronyn_brute_force.jpg?resize=400,300&ss

Yeah Bronxie, and besides the unfortunate placement of the rubber hose, another thing that appears kind'a "wrong" to me in this shot is that Hume's head seems a little oversized for the rest of his body, wouldn't ya say?

lol,  Hume IRL was a puny little fellow. (although I feel he uses this to his advantage in THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE)

But he must have relished this role -- so far removed from poor Herb in SHADOW OF A DOUBT. 

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The other evening I watched The Big Combo  (which I own on a very cheap and cheesey and probably semi-illegal boxed set.)   I think Eddie Muller may have mentioned this one in passing, but I'm not sure if he's ever shown it on Noir Alley.  (Anyone who knows otherwise, please feel free to enlighten me.)

I love this somewhat obscure noir.  It deserves to be better-known.  I mean, for one thing, it stars the wonderful actor Richard Conte, who was in so many good films, many noirs. Conte had the ability to play, equally well, sympathetic protagonists and nasty villains.  In The Big Combo he plays the latter, and quite a delightfully nasty villain he is, too.

The Big Combo also stars Cornel  Wilde (no relation to Oscar  😐 ), as the dedicated cop determined to bring Conte's evil gangster character to justice.  Cornel Wilde's other noir claim to fame is probably Road House, an enjoyable film co-starring Richard Widmark and Ida Lupino.  In Road House there's a scene where Wilde teaches Ida Lupino to bowl ! But I digress...

There are a lot of things to like in The Big Combo:  Its energetic pace, its mostly night scenes, filled with the alleys behind strip clubs and old Prohibition hide-outs,  its performances  - notably Conte's , as mentioned,  and - unexpected treat !  - Helen Walker  (you know, the beautiful, diabolical psychologist in Nightmare Alley ). One thing I found particularly intriguing,  and definitely ahead of its time, was the depiction of Conte's  (character, "Mr. Brown", you never know his first name, I love that !)  two main thugs, Fante  (Lee Van Cleef)  and Mingo (Earl Holliman),  who  appear to have a gay relationship.  They live together, sharing a bedroom, call each other "Honey",  and become devasted at the thought of losing one another.  This was very daring and almost revolutionary for 1955.

Also featured is an oddly sympathetic performance by Brian Donlevy as Conte's lackey, who once was his boss.  This is the second noir bad guy I've seen who's hard -of-hearing and wears a hearing aid.  (Fred Clark in Ride the Pink Horse being the other one...)  I say he's "oddly sympathetic" because he's quite horrid, unhesitating to use violence and also betrayal to get what he wants  (spoiler:  he doesn't).   But maybe because Donlevy conveys the frustration and humiliation of his character, mainly through his facial expression rather than through dialogue, you do feel just a bit sorry for him.

The weakest link in this well-done noir is the female lead, the unwilling lover of the Conte character, Susan.  Susan is played by Jean Wallace, an actress I'm not familiar with except for this one film.  She just doesn't impress me as someone Conte 's character would be so obsessed with.  She's ok, just not very memorable.  I kept thinking of who could have been better for the part -- for some reason Lizabeth Scott came to mind.

Anyway, The Big Combo had most of the elements in a typical noir that I like  (gritty settings, tough characters, tougher dialogue...) the only thing missing was a nightclub scene.  It's pretty darn good, I recommend it for any hard core fan of film noir from the classic noir era.

EDIT:  ps: I forgot to mention, this film was directed by Joseph Lewis,  and the cinematographer was John Alton. No wonder it's good.

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20 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

One more Sunday and Eddie is back. I've missed Noir Alley. I haven't checked his schedule, but hope he comes back strong.

Here's the Noir Alley schedule for September:

6 - Night Editor (1946)   (a TCM premiere)
12, 13 - Danger Signal (1945)
19, 20 - Gilda (1946)
26, 27 - They Won't Believe Me (1947)

Note that on the evening of Saturday the 5th TCM is showing an "End of Summer" music series, so Noir Alley is not scheduled.  The only showing that weekend is on Sunday morning.

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On 8/16/2020 at 5:22 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

lol,  Hume [CRONYN] IRL was a puny little fellow. (although I feel he uses this to his advantage in THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE)

But he must have relished this role -- so far removed from poor Herb in SHADOW OF A DOUBT. 

15 minutes ago, cmovieviewer said:

Here's the Noir Alley schedule for September:

6 - Night Editor (1946)   (a TCM premiere)
12, 13 - Danger Signal (1945)
19, 20 - Gilda (1946)
26, 27 - They Won't Believe Me (1947)

 

I dunno, I halfway suspect HERB had "MOTHER" trussed up and stuffed in a third floor room a little further down the lane in Santa Rosa.

THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME is a really good movie, not entirely unlike an unusually well-done episode of TALES FROM THE CRYPT, minus THANK CHRIST, the Cryptkeeper.

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18 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

The other evening I watched The Big Combo  (which I own on a very cheap and cheesey and probably semi-illegal boxed set.)   I think Eddie Muller may have mentioned this one in passing, but I'm not sure if he's ever shown it on Noir Alley.  (Anyone who knows otherwise, please feel free to enlighten me.)

I love this somewhat obscure noir.  It deserves to be better-known.  I mean, for one thing, it stars the wonderful actor Richard Conte, who was in so many good films, many noirs. Conte had the ability to play, equally well, sympathetic protagonists and nasty villains.  In The Big Combo he plays the latter, and quite a delightfully nasty villain he is, too.

The Big Combo also stars Cornel  Wilde (no relation to Oscar  😐 ), as the dedicated cop determined to bring Conte's evil gangster character to justice.  Cornel Wilde's other noir claim to fame is probably Road House, an enjoyable film co-starring Richard Widmark and Ida Lupino.  In Road House there's a scene where Wilde teaches Ida Lupino to bowl ! But I digress...

There are a lot of things to like in The Big Combo:  Its energetic pace, its mostly night scenes, filled with the alleys behind strip clubs and old Prohibition hide-outs,  its performances  - notably Conte's , as mentioned,  and - unexpected treat !  - Helen Walker  (you know, the beautiful, diabolical psychologist in Nightmare Alley ). One thing I found particularly intriguing,  and definitely ahead of its time, was the depiction of Conte's  (character, "Mr. Brown", you never know his first name, I love that !)  two main thugs, Fante  (Lee Van Cleef)  and Mingo (Earl Holliman),  who  appear to have a gay relationship.  They live together, sharing a bedroom, call each other "Honey",  and become devasted at the thought of losing one another.  This was very daring and almost revolutionary for 1955.

Also featured is an oddly sympathetic performance by Brian Donlevy as Conte's lackey, who once was his boss.  This is the second noir bad guy I've seen who's hard -of-hearing and wears a hearing aid.  (Fred Clark in Ride the Pink Horse being the other one...)  I say he's "oddly sympathetic" because he's quite horrid, unhesitating to use violence and also betrayal to get what he wants  (spoiler:  he doesn't).   But maybe because Donlevy conveys the frustration and humiliation of his character, mainly through his facial expression rather than through dialogue, you do feel just a bit sorry for him.

The weakest link in this well-done noir is the female lead, the unwilling lover of the Conte character, Susan.  Susan is played by Jean Wallace, an actress I'm not familiar with except for this one film.  She just doesn't impress me as someone Conte 's character would be so obsessed with.  She's ok, just not very memorable.  I kept thinking of who could have been better for the part -- for some reason Lizabeth Scott came to mind.

Anyway, The Big Combo had most of the elements in a typical noir that I like  (gritty settings, tough characters, tougher dialogue...) the only thing missing was a nightclub scene.  It's pretty darn good, I recommend it for any hard core fan of film noir from the classic noir era.

EDIT:  ps: I forgot to mention, this film was directed by Joseph Lewis,  and the cinematographer was John Alton. No wonder it's good.

The Big Combo is also the film that CORNEL WILDE WAS IN THE PENTHOUSE* was promoting when he appeared on I Love Lucy.  

* I can't help but think of Lucy Ricardo screaming this in her hotel room to blackmail Bobby the bellboy into letting her accompany him into Wilde's room.  Cornel Wilde will always be "CORNEL WILDE WAS IN THE PENTHOUSE!" to me. 

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44 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

[whispers].

                       " Gilda.....".

 

To quote the movie poster tagline: "There never was a woman like Gilda."

I love this movie, I don't care what anyone says.  The only con for me is the cop-out ending.

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48 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I dunno, I halfway suspect HERB had "MOTHER" trussed up and stuffed in a third floor room a little further down the lane in Santa Rosa.

THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME is a really good movie, not entirely unlike an unusually well-done episode of TALES FROM THE CRYPT, minus THANK CHRIST, the Cryptkeeper.

Brute Force (1947) Jules Dassin | Twenty Four Frames

This is very unfortunate hose and hand placement.

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Doesn’t say anything about a man though.

!

Lol. I guess they're a dime a dozen in this movie.

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19 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

To quote the movie poster tagline: "There never was a woman like Gilda."

I love this movie, I don't care what anyone says.  The only con for me is the cop-out ending.

I'm with you, Speedracer. I've only seen it once. I'm looking forward to my second viewing.

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4 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

I'm with you, Speedracer. I've only seen it once. I'm looking forward to my second viewing.

I’ve seen it at least a dozen times. I even have the Criterion Blu Ray. 

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On 8/24/2020 at 1:32 PM, speedracer5 said:

To quote the movie poster tagline: "There never was a woman like Gilda."

 

 

On 8/24/2020 at 2:33 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Doesn’t say anything about a man though.

!

 

On 8/24/2020 at 2:35 PM, speedracer5 said:

Lol. I guess they're a dime a dozen in this movie.

 

Well, I have to admit until recently I always DID think Glenn Ford was rather ordinary.  ;)

(...and until I caught him in Tea House of the August Moon and 3:10 to Yuma...after that, my opinion of him has risen a bit)

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Well, I have to admit until recently I always DID think Glenn Ford was rather ordinary.  ;)

(...and until I caught him in Tea House of the August Moon and 3:10 to Yuma...after that, my opinion of him has risen a bit)

I thought he was great in The Big Heat

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37 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I thought he was great in The Big Heat

Yep, I gotta admit the more I've seen of Glenn over the years, the better I've liked him.

(...saaaay, isn't there a thread goin' on right now about this sort'a thing?)  ;)

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3:10 TO YUMA changed my mind too, but I have to admit that’s the only film where he’s *really* impressed me a lot.

(There’s something kind of “on auto pilot” about Glenn Ford’s acting)

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

3:10 TO YUMA changed my mind too, but I have to admit that’s the only film where he’s *really* impressed me a lot.

(There’s something kind of “on auto pilot” about Glenn Ford’s acting)

He is one of those actors I want to like, but sometimes don't.  Probably a combination of the screenplays, directors, other actors, etc. in each movie.  I particularly like him in Affair in Trinidad and Plunder of the Sun.

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I find Glenn Ford's character in Gilda to be quite dislikable. In fact there's nobody in that film that could even vaguely be described as a "nice" person. Maybe that's why it appeals to noir fans. But then I didn't like Ford either when he was reunited with Rita as a hot headed lover in The Loves of Carmen. His one '40s film in which I did think he was effective was when, appropriately, he played a ruthless cold blooded creep in Lust for Gold.

By the time of The Big Heat, however, a lot of that angry tension of his earlier characters had been replaced by a more laid back screen presence (even if he was a guy out for revenge here). This laid back Ford, which would become more and more his '50s screen persona (two westerns, 3:10 to Yuma and The Sheepman are great illustrations of it) made Ford more engaging, in my opinion, than he had been in the previous decade of his career.

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 i really like Glenn Ford, he is the fastest draw in movie westerns…. like Dargo  Tea House of the August Moon and 3:10 to Yuma made a difference for me when i watched them 15 years ago for the first time.

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I like Glenn Ford. I thought he was very moving as the dad in Ransom.  Thought he was great in 3:10 to Yuma and I always enjoy The Courtship of Eddie's Father and Dear Heart. I even like him in Cimarron and The Gazebo.  I love the film Gilda and yes his character is not likeable  but he does a good job with the role and he was very good in The Big Heat. I'm not sure which I had seen first, I think Gilda probably but 3;10 to Yuma is the film of his that made me really appreciate his acting ability. 

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 I can't wait for Eddie to be back! Seems like 6 months, not one. I havent seen the first 2 films and They Wont Believe Me is worth another look. I've seen Gilda too many times, I'll take a pass on that one, but might tune in for Eddie's comments.

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