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Lorna, you might be interested in this:  The Noir Alley feature this weekend is "Tomorrow is Another Day".  It stars Steve Cochran,  who I think you once described as hot. I know I think he is.  He's paired with Ruth Roman, who initially seems an odd choice.  But Ruth's actually pretty good in this, the whole thing works.

I believe Eddie has already previously shown this film on Noir Alley.  But I'm ok with seeing it again.  I just think, if that's the case  (already aired on Noir Alley),  Eddie should acknowledge that fact.   Maybe he will.

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32 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Lorna, you might be interested in this:  The Noir Alley feature this weekend is "Tomorrow is Another Day".  It stars Steve Cochran,  who I think you once described as hot. I know I think he is.  He's paired with Ruth Roman, who initially seems an odd choice.  But Ruth's actually pretty good in this, the whole thing works.

I believe Eddie has already previously shown this film on Noir Alley.  But I'm ok with seeing it again.  I just think, if that's the case  (already aired on Noir Alley),  Eddie should acknowledge that fact.   Maybe he will.

Curious why you felt that Roman initially appeared to be "an odd choice" for the female lead in Tomorrow is Another Day (assuming I'm following your drift here).       I have always viewed Roman as being an actress that didn't telegraph the emotions of her character;  I.e.  it wasn't clear to me what this dame was thinking \ feeling.    She could go one-way or the other.

So in that way I felt she was well cast for the film.  

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46 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Lorna, you might be interested in this:  The Noir Alley feature this weekend is "Tomorrow is Another Day".  It stars Steve Cochran,  who I think you once described as hot. I know I think he is.  He's paired with Ruth Roman, who initially seems an odd choice.  But Ruth's actually pretty good in this, the whole thing works.

I believe Eddie has already previously shown this film on Noir Alley.  But I'm ok with seeing it again.  I just think, if that's the case  (already aired on Noir Alley),  Eddie should acknowledge that fact.   Maybe he will.

I mentioned TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY was upcoming, But erroneously posted it in the I just watched thread and then I had to run and didn’t have time to correct it.

I remember liking it. Although it’s a very bad wig Ruth Roman wears.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I mentioned TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY was upcoming, But erroneously posted it in the I just watched thread and then I had to run and didn’t have time to correct it.

I remember liking it. Although it’s a very bad wig Ruth Roman wears.

Yea,  why the producer \ directed decided Roman should be a blonde is beyond  me.       Channeling Stanwyck in Double Indemnity?

 

Tomorrow is another day poster small.jpg

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6 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yea,  why the producer \ directed decided Roman should be a blonde is beyond  me.       Channeling Stanwyck in Double Indemnity?

 

Tomorrow is another day poster small.jpg

If Ruth is also sportin' an anklet, then she'd be goin' for "The Full Babs".

Btw, I noticed after goggle imaging Ruth in this film just now, half the shots of her with Cochran, show her with her natural brunette hair.

(...guess I'll find out tonight why this is, huh...in this one I'll bet it's shown that she is wearing a wig, and unlike in Double Indemnity)

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I had only seen "Tomorrow Is Another Day" once before on TCM, but it's been about a decade.  Funny, but I didn't even remember the first half of the film.  I remembered the second part, after Cochran and Roman arrive at the migrant farm worker camp.

I thought this was a good film, despite the tame (and some might say lame) ending.  It was interesting that Steve Cochran's character was sentenced to prison when he was 13...and stayed there for 18 years!  He gives a nice performance as a suspicious and yet, naive ex-con trying to navigate in a world that seems familiar and at the same time different from what he once knew.  You can tell he's not used to communicating with attractive women by the way he speaks to them or the clumsy and rough way he tries to kiss Ruth Roman at the beginning of their relationship.  As the picture progresses though, he reveals his more gentle side; that he wants to make good in the world and have meaningful relationships with people...so long as they never find out about his past.  Once they start sniffing around his pad though, that old paranoia grips him, and he overreacts and freaks out near the picture's climax.

As for Ruth Roman being a blonde at the outset of her introduction, I think it was better she went from blonde to brunette instead of the other way around.  After all, she said she changed her hair color to throw the cops off their trail.  It was an interesting look for her, but I think it fit rather well, given the attitude of her character when we first meet her as a dance hall girl in the city versus the more down-to-earth look she sported at the farm camp.  Lurene Tuttle and Ray Teal made a good, believable couple that befriended the younger pair when they first met up, although I thought they were a bit on the old-looking side to have a kid who was 10 or 12 years old.  Then again, when I was that young, I thought people in their 40's were ancient! 😲

I'd rate "Tomorrow Is Another Day" a 7 out of 10. 

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Does anyone know the name of the popular song intermittently played on the soundtrack in TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY? It's played by orchestra under the film's opening titles and, early in the film, when Steve Cochran meets the reporter in the diner the reporter plays the same tune on the juxebox, commenting that the tune was popular when he was a kid and was making a comeback.

A lot of '40s noirs took advantage of popular songs at the time, using them for melancholy or romantic effect.  The standard "Tangerine," for example, wafts through the air from a neighbour's home as Stanwyck and MacMurray eye one another for their final confrontation in Double Indemnity.

In any event, the song used in Tomorrow Is Another Day has a vague, wistful quality that appeals to me and I hope someone may know its name.

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1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

Interesting suggestion. 

Are you sure they haven't done any programming like this before?

 

16 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Does anyone know the name of the popular song intermittently played on the soundtrack in TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY? It's played by orchestra under the film's opening titles and, early in the film, when Steve Cochran meets the reporter in the diner the reporter plays the same tune on the juxebox, commenting that the tune was popular when he was a kid and was making a comeback.

A lot of '40s noirs took advantage of popular songs at the time, using them for melancholy or romantic effect.  The standard "Tangerine," for example, wafts through the air from a neighbour's home as Stanwyck and MacMurray eye one another for their final confrontation in Double Indemnity.

In any event, the song used in Tomorrow Is Another Day has a vague, wistful quality that appeals to me and I hope someone may know its name.

Here you go. Which one? Probably Hey Doc.

Soundtrack Credits 
Deep Night
Written by Charles Henderson
Heard under opening credits, and several other times in the movie
Later heard under the opening of "Bonnie and Clyde" (1967), a more famous movie about a couple on the run from the law
A Little on the Lonely Side
(uncredited)
Written by Frank Weldon, Richard Robertson and James Cavanaugh
Played by the band at Play Land
I Cover the Waterfront
(uncredited)
Music by Johnny Green
Played by the band at Play Land
Trade Winds
(uncredited)
Music by Cliff Friend
Played by the band at Play Land
Get Happy
(uncredited)
Music by Harold Arlen
Played when Bill gets a new suit
Hey, Doc
(uncredited)
Music by Edgar M. Sampson
Played at the diner when Bill and Cay climb onto the car transport

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7 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

 

Here you go. Which one?

Soundtrack Credits 
Deep Night
Written by Charles Henderson
Heard under opening credits, and several other times in the movie
Later heard under the opening of "Bonnie and Clyde" (1967), a more famous movie about a couple on the run from the law
A Little on the Lonely Side
(uncredited)
Written by Frank Weldon, Richard Robertson and James Cavanaugh
Played by the band at Play Land
I Cover the Waterfront
(uncredited)
Music by Johnny Green
Played by the band at Play Land
Trade Winds
(uncredited)
Music by Cliff Friend
Played by the band at Play Land
Get Happy
(uncredited)
Music by Harold Arlen
Played when Bill gets a new suit
Hey, Doc
(uncredited)
Music by Edgar M. Sampson
Played at the diner when Bill and Cay climb onto the car transport

That's great, cigarjoe. Thanks very much for sharing your knowledge.

I see that Deep Night goes back to 1929 and was sung by Rudy Vallee. It really works well on Tomorrow Is Another Day.

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I also thought Felix Feist's direction of this film was excellent, and as Eddie pointed out during his wraparound.

In fact, during that one scene near the end of the picture when Roman and Lureen Tuttle are eyeing each other suspiciously while riding back from the hospital to their migrant cabins in the back of the police car, I began to get Hitchcockian vibes.

(...but yeah, as Eddie also mentioned, it's a shame the ending went the way it did, as with more of a downer ending, this film might be better regarded than it is)

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

A lot of '40s noirs took advantage of popular songs at the time, using them for melancholy or romantic effect.  The standard "Tangerine," for example, wafts through the air from a neighbour's home as Stanwyck and MacMurray eye one another for their final confrontation in Double Indemnity.

Tangerine was written by Director Victor Schertzinger.   He wrote it (and I'll Remember You)  for his last film,  "The Fleet is In" in 1941.

This was a Paramount film and they obtained the rights.       Double Indemnity was also a Paramount film,    and this is why that song (which was fairly "new") was used for that film.

Sadly Schertzinger died shortly after the release of The Fleet is in.     He left a fine legacy of films and music.

(and the great Johnny Mercer wrote the lyrics to both Tangerine and I'll Remember You (one of my favorite romantic songs).

 

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Forgotten that I had seen this before some time back, but as each scene came up I remembered it.  The scene with the auto-carrier clinched it.  Would rate it 6/10.  Thought it was interesting that they managed to hitch-hike or jump trains in only a couple of days to reach CA.

I wonder if the motor courts were as convenient as they appeared to be in this movie.    Also noticed that Chesterfield cigarettes were featured.  Product placement or did somebody just like them?  I have noticed Chesterfields were frequently used in movies.

Thought occurred to me while watching about the roadside diners that reminded me of the Highway Patrol TV series.  Lots of different small, roadside diners are used in it.  Usually in some out of the way stretch of road.

 

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22 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Forgotten that I had seen this before some time back, but as each scene came up I remembered it.  The scene with the auto-carrier clinched it.  Would rate it 6/10.  Thought it was interesting that they managed to hitch-hike or jump trains in only a couple of days to reach CA.

I wonder if the motor courts were as convenient as they appeared to be in this movie.    Also noticed that Chesterfield cigarettes were featured.  Product placement or did somebody just like them?  I have noticed Chesterfields were frequently used in movies.

Thought occurred to me while watching about the roadside diners that reminded me of the Highway Patrol TV series.  Lots of different small, roadside diners are used in it.  Usually in some out of the way stretch of road.

 

That's 'cause the smooth flavor of Chesterfields leaves no unpleasant after-taste, Cid!

Or haven't you heard?  ;)

(...btw, as I'm sure you know, most all of those roadside dinners would go the way of the dodo after Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System would bypass them within a little over a decade...but isn't it cool to see 'em in these old flicks)

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1 minute ago, Dargo said:

That's 'cause the smooth flavor of Chesterfields leave no unpleasant after-taste, Cid!

Or haven't you heard?  ;)

(...btw, as I'm sure you know, most all of those roadside dinners would go the way of the dodo after Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System would bypass them within a little over a decade...but isn't it cool to see 'em in these old flicks)

What gets me is how small some of them were to have been viable businesses.

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2 minutes ago, ElCid said:

What gets me is how small some of them were to have been viable businesses.

Well, remember here, EVERYTHING was smaller back then.

(...even your average American) ;)

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I enjoyed Tomorrow Is Another Day very much, sappy happy ending or not. It's a shame that Ruth Roman is probably best remembered for Strangers on a Train today because she is really not at her best in that film, coming across as too cold (and that short hair style hardly heightened her attractiveness).

In this film, however, in the film's first half as the blonde dance hall hostess, she gets to play your hard boiled noir dame, but in the later scenes (following the hair dye job) she has a chance to portray a more sensitive side to her character, along with some emotional vulnerability.

I enjoy watching Steve Cochran in pretty much anything, including when he's playing a hard boiled tough guy, such as Big Ed in White Heat. But Tomorrow Is Another Day shows that he was a better actor than just a tough guy stereotype and could play vulnerability, as well. He's very effective as, essentially, an adolescent in a man's body who gets released from prison. He's unprepared for the outside world. You see his initial suspiciousness with strangers, combined with a naivety (his scenes with the reporter). Later come his awkward moments with women in his big city loneliness, followed later by a sensitivity, as well as paranoia.

Cochran brings a naive innocence to his character that makes him very sympathetic. A few years later Cochran would deliver another sympathetic performance as a flawed character seeking redemption in a little gem that recently premiered on TCM, Come Next Spring.

And I like some of the other little touches of sensitivity to be found in Tomorrow Is Another Day, as well, such as the reporter who refuses to lay charges after being assaulted by Cochran because he knows he did him an unfair dirty turn for the sake of a headline and had it coming. There is also, of course, the migrant family, headed by Ray Teal (for once not playing a loud mouth louse) and Lurene Tuttle. Tuttle's eventual betrayal of Cochran for the money to help her husband, and her tearful anguish over it, makes her no back stabbing villainess. She's a human being in a desperate situation forced into performing an action she despises. Who can't understand and even identify with her situation?

By the way, anyone notice that when the film ends, with all attention upon Cochran and Roman, we have no idea what will happen to Teal, badly in need of money for surgery following his accident?

roman-gun.png

Classic noir imagery

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Another thing about this film that this gearhead here thought was a neat touch was not only the suspenseful sequence when our two leads sneak their way into the car being transported atop the car carrier, but also being reminded that the rear doors on those old Mercury sedans opened from the front...

i319655.jpg

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44 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Thought it was interesting that they managed to hitch-hike or jump trains in only a couple of days to reach CA.

I have seen the film before but didn't notice how quickly the two crossed the entire nation in just a couple of days (when the Teal character comments that it was only 3 days after the murder when they meet them by the side of road in CA).

I enjoyed Muelers' comments.     So this was worth watching for me again,  just for those.

Also,  I think this is the best work by Cochran.    He was solid as the noir protagonist.  

 

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14 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I have seen the film before but didn't notice how quickly the two crossed the entire nation in just a couple of days (when the Teal character comments that it was only 3 days after the murder when they meet them by the side of road in CA).

I enjoyed Muelers' comments.     So this was worth watching for me again,  just for those.

Also,  I think this is the best work by Cochran.    He was solid as the noir protagonist.  

 

It should have been more like three weeks or months or more. She's pregnant. Also that True Crime Magazine probably wasn't published every few days. It's probably a screw up in the script of the line reading otherwise id doesn't make much sense. I'll watch it on demand again and see if there are any ore indications of more time passing' 

 

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30 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

It should have been more like three weeks or months or more. She's pregnant. Also that True Crime Magazine probably wasn't published every few days. It's probably a screw up in the script of the line reading otherwise id doesn't make much sense. I'll watch it on demand again and see if there are any ore indications of more time passing' 

 

While the 3 day cross-country thing does seem a bit quick, and even considering it appears much of their traveling was done by trains which might be 24hrs-a-day nonstop, I did get the sense that our two leads had been at that migrant camp for quite a while, maybe a month or two, before the final action took place.

(...and enough to become closer friends with the other couple)

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20 minutes ago, Dargo said:

While the 3 day cross-country thing does seem a bit quick, and even considering it appears much of their traveling was done by trains which might be 24hrs-a-day nonstop, I did get the sense that our two leads had been at that migrant camp for quite a while, maybe a month or two, before the final action took place.

(...and enough to become closer friends with the other couple)

That makes sense but didn't Roy Teal say the murder took place 3 days ago or somebody said he said that. I'm going to watch it again and report back. 

 

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21 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

That makes sense but didn't Roy Teal say the murder took place 3 days ago or somebody said he said that. I'm going to watch it again and report back. 

 

As I recall, Teal asks Tuttle after their kid shows them the magazine, is to confirm the thought that they first met them on the road a few days after the killing.

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