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14 minutes ago, Dargo said:

As I recall, Teal asks Tuttle after their kid shows them the magazine, is to confirm the thought that they first met them on the road a few days after the killing.

Yes, that is the conversation I was referencing.     Again,  never noticed it before,   but this time I did, and said to my wife "Did I just hear that guy say 3 days after the murder".

PS:  This just came to me:   maybe it was 3 days after the guy died?      I.e.  say after he was shot it was a week or so before he died.     If "after the murder" was really "after he died" then there was additional lag-time between the day he was shot and the day he died.     That would make sense because it isn't murder until someone dies.

 

 

 

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43 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yes, that is the conversation I was referencing.     Again,  never noticed it before,   but this time I did, and said to my wife "Did I just hear that guy say 3 days after the murder".

PS:  This just came to me:   maybe it was 3 days after the guy died?      I.e.  say after he was shot it was a week or so before he died.     If "after the murder" was really "after he died" then there was additional lag-time between the day he was shot and the day he died.     That would make sense because it isn't murder until someone dies.

The way I remember it was that the cop died the very next day after being shot, as Cochran almost immediately goes to that little New Jersey town where Roman told him she was going to live with her brother for a while and right after Cochran reads about the shooting in the newspaper the following day, and whereupon Roman informs Cochran that the cop had died. And then with the both of them immediately going on the lam together.

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21 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Curious why you felt that Roman initially appeared to be "an odd choice" for the female lead in Tomorrow is Another Day (assuming I'm following your drift here).       I have always viewed Roman as being an actress that didn't telegraph the emotions of her character;  I.e.  it wasn't clear to me what this dame was thinking \ feeling.    She could go one-way or the other.

So in that way I felt she was well cast for the film.  

Ruth was pretty good in Tomorrow is Another Day .  The reason I said her casting seemed "an odd choice" was because I have recently viewed  (for about the 10th time )  Strangers on a Train, in which she plays a very different kind of person from that of Cathy /Nicky in Tomorrow is Another  Day.  In the Hitchcock film, as I'm sure you're aware, Ruth plays a very classy young woman, the daughter of a senator  (or something like that.)  She is very elegant and poised.  Whereas in TIAD,  her character is tough and world weary.  Of course she changes as the movie's narrative progresses, but still, she's very different from the upper-crusty Anne Morton in Strangers.

I haven't actually seen her in much else.

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21 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I mentioned TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY was upcoming, But erroneously posted it in the I just watched thread and then I had to run and didn’t have time to correct it.

I remember liking it. Although it’s a very bad wig Ruth Roman wears.

Do you agree Steve Cochran is quite,  shall we say, fine,  in this film?

Tomorrow Is Another Day (1951) - Photo Gallery - IMDb

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Just now, misswonderly3 said:

Do you agree Steve Cochran is quite,  shall we say, fine,  in this film?

Tomorrow Is Another Day (1951) - Photo Gallery - IMDb

he's fine in EVERY FILM. I recently tried watching the TECHNICOLOR 195something REPUBLIC film he did with ANNE SHERIDAN, but it was too hokey to finish- but he was fine in that.

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RUTH ROMAN is also among the cast of BEYOND THE FOREST (1949) OR SHOULD I SAY, she's among the SURVIVORS...

coincidentally, she survived a later literal shipwreck when she was aboard the LUXURY LINER The SS Andrea Doria when it struck a freighter, capsized and sank off Nantucket (I think.)

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4 hours ago, TomJH said:

Does anyone know the name of the popular song intermittently played on the soundtrack in TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY? It's played by orchestra under the film's opening titles and, early in the film, when Steve Cochran meets the reporter in the diner the reporter plays the same tune on the juxebox, commenting that the tune was popular when he was a kid and was making a comeback.

A lot of '40s noirs took advantage of popular songs at the time, using them for melancholy or romantic effect.  The standard "Tangerine," for example, wafts through the air from a neighbour's home as Stanwyck and MacMurray eye one another for their final confrontation in Double Indemnity.

In any event, the song used in Tomorrow Is Another Day has a vague, wistful quality that appeals to me and I hope someone may know its name.

Do you mean "I Cover the Waterfront" ?

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11 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I haven't rewatched it yet...I recall it being good, but I also recall being miffed at the plot point that RUTH ROMAN's character successfully dyes her hair from CHESTNUT to NUCLEAR BLONDE- and also sets and styes it flawlessly.

Only in movies does that happen.

Yeah Lorna, and funny you mentioning this, as I noticed this very same thing the other night while watching King Solomon's Mines, and after Deborah Kerr becomes miffed at trying to comb her extremely long and STRAIGHT reddish-blonde hair while out in the bush, and so grabs some scissors and begins cutting it.

And whaddaya know?! The very NEXT scene, she's lookin' like THIS...

95c601a39965d406b6220b83810819b5.jpg

(...who knew Toni home permanents went as far back as the 1880s?...I certainly didn't!)

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12 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Ruth was pretty good in Tomorrow is Another Day .  The reason I said her casting seemed "an odd choice" was because I have recently viewed  (for about the 10th time )  Strangers on a Train, in which she plays a very different kind of person from that of Cathy /Nicky in Tomorrow is Another  Day.  In the Hitchcock film, as I'm sure you're aware, Ruth plays a very classy young woman, the daughter of a senator  (or something like that.)  She is very elegant and poised.  Whereas in TIAD,  her character is tough and world weary.  Of course she changes as the movie's narrative progresses, but still, she's very different from the upper-crusty Anne Morton in Strangers.

I haven't actually seen her in much else.

Eddie Muller in his intro implied that Ruth Roman was made for noir (or something like that).       

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19 minutes ago, Dargo said:

The way I remember it was that the cop died the very next day after being shot, as Cochran almost immediately goes to that little New Jersey town where Roman told him she was going to live with her brother for a while and right after Cochran reads about the shooting in the newspaper the following day, and whereupon Roman informs Cochran that the cop had died. And then with the both of them immediately going on the lam together.

I forgot about that.   So yea even if one says the clock starts at the time of his death,   they were in the state of NY or NJ (where the brother lived) when they went on the run and headed west.      Funny but what stood out the most for me in that scene was Lee Patrick (who was just featured a few hours before in The Maltese Falcon),  being the sister-in-law from hell!     

Anyhow,  I was just trying to find some "out" here for the screenwriter.    Guess there isn't one.

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yeah Lorna, and funny you mentioning this, as I noticed this very same thing the other night while watching King Solomon's Mine, and after Deborah Kerr becomes miffed at trying to comb her extremely long and STRAIGHT reddish-blonde hair while out in the bush, and so grabs some scissors and begins cutting it.

And whaddaya know?! The very NEXT scene, she's lookin' like THIS...

95c601a39965d406b6220b83810819b5.jpg

(...who knew Toni home permanents went as far back as the 1880s?...I certainly didn't!)

My wife saw this film for the first time this week,  and she noticed the same thing.     This is kind of a score spot for her right now since she can't get her hair done.

She made a joke about this:  I need a director like that actress!

 

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2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Eddie Muller in his intro implied that Ruth Roman was made for noir (or something like that).       

Well, sure, I'm not arguing that point.  I was just explaining that I hadn't seen her in much else besides "Strangers On a Train", in which, as I said, she's like the polar -opposite of her character in "Tomorrow is Another Day".

But someone here mentioned  (sorry,  I forget who) that she was also in another noir ,  "The Window".  And yes,  I have seen that a couple of times, and it's good, and Ruth is very effective in it.

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6 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Eddie Muller in his intro implied that Ruth Roman was made for noir (or something like that).       

Yes, I've always thought of Ruth Roman as playing, as Eddie said, "the flinty type" or more earthy type of woman, myself.

(...but then again, I guess I've watched more films she's been in than MissW has, and by her own admission here)

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

Another thing about this film that this gearhead here thought was a neat touch was not only the suspenseful sequence when our two leads sneak their way into the car being transported atop the car carrier, but also being reminded that the rear doors on those old Mercury sedans opened from the front...

i319655.jpg

Ah yes, suicide doors, to be re-introduced in the 1960's Lincolns.   I thought it interesting that the keys were not tagged so that Roman had to try every key on the ring before finding the right one.  Of course this may have been done to add to the suspense of trying to hide before the driver comes out.  Interesting that the driver got up from counter and headed toward diner door but actually went to the jukebox.  Then he later came out and headed for the truck, but went around the corner to the restroom.

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20 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Do you mean "I Cover the Waterfront" ?

No, that's not the song. Cigarjoe already identified "Deep Night" as the one used throughout Tomorrow Is Another Day.

Since you say you haven't seen much of Ruth Roman, I might mention that one of her most appealing performances is in CHAMPION (1949), the boxing drama that made a star of Kirk Douglas. Ruth plays a waitress that Kirk romances and abandons (the rat!) and she brings a real warmth and vulnerability to her characterization. And, as you can see, a one piece white bathing suit doesn't do any harm either when it comes to her appeal in the film.

4184a.jpg

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3 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Ah yes, suicide doors, to be re-introduced in the 1960's Lincolns.   I thought it interesting that the keys were not tagged so that Roman had to try every key on the ring before finding the right one.  Of course this may have been done to add to the suspense of trying to hide before the driver comes out.  Interesting that the driver got up from counter and headed toward diner door but actually went to the jukebox.  Then he later came out and headed for the truck, but went around the corner to the restroom.

Yeah, those little touches sure added to the tension of the scene alright, didn't they Cid.

(...and perhaps once again, and especially considering the camera angles and placements Feist chose in this particular scene, calling up my earlier thought about how well this film was directed)

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

It should have been more like three weeks or months or more. She's pregnant. Also that True Crime Magazine probably wasn't published every few days. It's probably a screw up in the script of the line reading otherwise id doesn't make much sense. I'll watch it on demand again and see if there are any ore indications of more time passing' 

 

Could be mistaken, but I thought they were at the farm camp for several weeks before she announced she was pregnant.

2 hours ago, Dargo said:

While the 3 day cross-country thing does seem a bit quick, and even considering it appears much of their traveling was done by trains which might be 24hrs-a-day nonstop, I did get the sense that our two leads had been at that migrant camp for quite a while, maybe a month or two, before the final action took place.

(...and enough to become closer friends with the other couple)

Would have to dig out one of my railroad DVD's, but even modern express freights take days to cross the country.  In the 60's or 70's there was one that travelled from Southern CA to New York City and I think it was  48 hours to rush perishable foods.  Could have only been 24 or so hours though.   Similar for fruits and vegetables coming from South to the North.  Anyway it took a lot of coordination by multiple railroads and numerous crew changes and switching of cars and engines to get it done.  The freights they were hopping probably didn't go more than 50 MPH and stopped frequently judging by the ones in the movie.

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Ironically I caught the last 15 minutes of an Untouchables episode with Ruth Roman this afternoon.  Apparently she was a narcotics dealer who killed her husband to go into business with Frank Nitti.  Then later she killed one of her drivers because he would not kill a woman she wanted dead.

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

I haven't actually seen her in much else.

You've got to see her in The Window  then. There she plays a B-Girl hooker who lures drunks up to her pad where she drugs them and her husband Paul Stewart robs them.

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For those who enjoyed Steve Cochran's performance in Tomorrow Is Another Day, for an idea of the actor's versatility, he reverts back to gangster killer form in Highway 301, a 1950 Warner Brothers melodrama that TCM occasionally shows. Steve plays the head of the Tri State Gang, a band of bank robbers who strike banks across three states. Cochran looks hunky and brooding in his beautifully tailored suits but his character is deadly for anyone who crosses him.

While the film has a cornball "Crime Does Not Pay" introduction and ending, it is quite an exciting gangster drama, highlighted by Cochran's incredibly casual attitude about shooting people down. One particularly suspenseful sequence involves Cochran looking for his girlfriend who he decides talks too much about the gang's activity.

MV5BYzBhYmVhMTctZTQzMC00YjA3LWI3NWUtNWQ3

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22 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

You've got to see her in The Window  then. There she plays a B-Girl hooker who lures drunks up to her pad where she drugs them and her husband Paul Stewart robs them.

 

23 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Well, sure, I'm not arguing that point.  I was just explaining that I hadn't seen her in much else besides "Strangers On a Train", in which, as I said, she's like the polar -opposite of her character in "Tomorrow is Another Day".

But someone here mentioned  (sorry,  I forget who) that she was also in another noir ,  "The Window".  And yes,  I have seen that a couple of times, and it's good, and Ruth is very effective in it.

Yes, joe, guess you missed that post I wrote above  (easy to do, I miss others' posts all the time.)  But I agree, Ruth was good in her role as part of the murdering duo in "The Window".

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Beer with pie? Get outta here, man. I noticed that we see Ruth or her twin sister earlier in the movie

when Steve hits town and sees her walking down the street and lets his peepers follow her. That's

when she is a brunette. I've seen this one two or three times before and always enjoy it, especially

the familiar two kids, though older kids, on the run theme. Usually the two kids start out in love,

but in this case they're like the bickersons at the beginning and then, in that good old Hollywood

tradition, discover that they really love one another, like a modern romcom. And like two hippies,

they leave the dirty old city to get back to the country. I didn't mind the happy ending. These two

deserved it. 

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7 hours ago, TomJH said:

 

By the way, anyone notice that when the film ends, with all attention upon Cochran and Roman, we have no idea what will happen to Teal, badly in need of money for surgery following his accident?

 

Wasn't there a reward? I assumed that was part of the motivation for turning them in to the police. 

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