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30 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Don't forget to watch The Burglar this Saturday \ Sunday on Noir Alley.     1957,  Columbia film with Dan Duryea,  Jayne Mansfield and Martha Vickers.  (and of course Eddie Muller).

The Burglar (1957) — The Movie Database (TMDb)

 

 

Vickers had a good performance in The Falcon in Mexico.  She was going by Martha MacVicar then.

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Just now, ElCid said:

Vickers had a good performance in The Falcon in Mexico.  She was going by Martha MacVicar then.

Well ya know Cid, James here wouldn't care if Martha gave "a good performace" in that flick or NOT!

(...right JAMES?!)  ;)

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Don't forget to watch The Burglar this Saturday \ Sunday on Noir Alley.     1957,  Columbia film with Dan Duryea,  Jayne Mansfield and Martha Vickers.  (and of course Eddie Muller).

The Burglar (1957) — The Movie Database (TMDb)

 

 

I've seen this once before, but I've forgotten a lot of it.

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On 12/9/2020 at 4:04 PM, Dargo said:

While I respect your opinion of boxing as being brutal and because there's no getting around it, it is, I believe it is a "sport" as it is in fact an athletic endeavor involving two individuals.

(...now on the other had, I've never considered hunting or target shooting a "sport", as there is almost no athleticism involved in that endeavor, save perhaps during an Olympic Pentathlon competition)

I love boxing.  I'm considering subscribing to DAZN for one month just so I can watch Canelo and GGG fight (different fights) next weekend.  I wish that boxing had a better way of determining the bouts, in that I don't really take the championship titles seriously when the fighter is allowed to pick and choose his fights.  They should use brackets and create some sort of tournament that way to determine a real champion; but I digress.

I can understand someone's dislike of the sport for being brutal and I agree it can be; but I do agree that it is a sport.  It's just as much a mind game as it is a physical one.  The fighter has to anticipate his opponent's next move by watching their body language, their face, etc. Then, the more body shots they land, the more they can weaken their opponent by draining their stamina. I think there is a lot of strategy involved when it comes to getting TKO or KO or just winning the bout by getting the most points. 

While I can see the brutality, I also figure that both fighters are willing participants, so I can't feel too sorry for them.  Nobody forced them to become boxers.

I love The Set-Up and Gentleman Jim.  I have Body and Soul and The Harder They Fall on my DVR. I've wanted to see Champion.  I love boxing and baseball movies.  Those are my favorite sports movies to watch. 

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The Burglar is one of those movies that I don't remember until I start watching it and remember as the scenes unfold.

I'll give it a 5/10.  Not really impressed with any of the acting, although Dan Duryea did do a good job.  Interesting to see an older Martha Vickers - still looking good.  Never really impressed with the "blondes" Eddie mentions in the intro.

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This was an interesting movie; one that I'd never seen until this weekend.  It brought back some memories for me.  First time I ever flew was on an Eastern Airlines flight from St. Louis to Philadelphia.  It was about 3 weeks after I got out of junior high, and my dad took me with him to his annual union convention in Atlantic City.  Our hotel was on the Boardwalk and I had a great time taking in all the sites, concessions, and attractions along the way.  The Atlantic Ocean and the Steel Pier were visible from our room.

As for the movie, I liked "The Burglar".  The camera shots and the bare-bones, near squalid conditions the crooks were living in stood out.  If you want to get involved in a low-level life of crime, do you really want to live in conditions like that?  Dan Duryea gives a good performance as the level-headed leader of the small-time crime ring that's looking for its biggest score ever, after a mansion owned by a 'spiritual sister' is cased by Jayne Mansfield.  A valuable necklace is stolen, but once the heat is turned up by the Philly P.D., Duryea sends Mansfield off to Atlantic City with the necklace.  One of the Philadelphia cops (Stewart Bradley) turns out to be one of the dirtiest you'll see in movies, as he kills one of gang members and sets his sights on Mansfield, whom he suspects is in on the theft ring.  The cop's accomplice, played by Martha Vickers, tries to weasel information about the heist and the necklace's whereabouts from Duryea, but he eventually discovers her true motive when he overhears a conversation she has with Bradley.  Duryea then tries frantically to reach Mansfield to help lead her to safety, while Bradley and Vickers are trying to figure out where the thieves are heading to try and elude them.  The picture ends at one of the most famous attractions of Old Atlantic City...the Steel Pier!

I loved the climax of the film at the fun house.  It would be disconcerting to enter a place by yourself or with one or two other people and hearing the specter of doom great you like the mechanical figure did.  It was very reminiscent of the ending of "The Lady From Shanghai", as Eddie Muller mentioned in his post-picture comments.  All in all, I'd give this a 7 out of 10.

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1 minute ago, midwestan said:

Jayne Mansfield.  A valuable necklace is stolen, but once the heat is turned up by the Philly P.D., Duryea sends Mansfield off to Atlantic City with the necklace. 

My take was that he sent Mansfield away primarily to get her away from Mickey Shaughnessy. 

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On 12/6/2020 at 8:54 PM, uncle charlie said:

I didn't see the Mueller's intro but the wrap-up was identical to the wrap from two years ago.

I don't mind if Eddie repeats a film once in a while on Noir Alley  (although I do have to wonder why, given the wealth of noirs there are to be shown),  but I do think he should acknowledge when this happens -- that is, when a noir is aired a second time on N.A.   If he doesn't  mention it,  it looks like he's hoping people won't remember it was shown before, for whatever reason.  He could come right out and say that it's a second airing, and then maybe say why.  I don't know, it seems more honest, or at least, "transparent" to do so.

That said, I like Eddie Muller and the way he does Noir Alley, and I wouldn't let something like that stop me from enjoying the program.

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Prior to last night, I hadn't seen The Burglar.  I always watch/DVR every Noir Alley, even if I already own the film.   I record Noir Alley specifically for Eddie Muller's opening and closing comments.

I found The Burglar an interesting film.  I always enjoy the mid-to-late 50s noir as it seems a little grittier, less romanticized.  It was refreshing seeing such a young Jayne Mansfield speaking with what I presume was her normal voice and looking like a regular, yet pretty 20-something young woman.  I actually found Jayne prettier here than I do when she's "Jayne Mansfield" the pin-up.  I know Eddie mentioned her big star-making role on Broadway in Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?   I've seen the film adaptation once and found Jayne's character so incredibly irritating that it spoiled the film for me.  Maybe I'll have to give it another chance.

Anyway, I hated Mickey Shaughnessy's character, he was so gross.

I loved Dan Duryea, he's always fantastic, though I laughed when his character was supposedly 35.  Riiiiight. The only character's age I believed was Jayne's. 

This was such a unique film and I really loved how it looked.  I am planning on re-watching it again. 

It wasn't the greatest film noir I'd ever seen, but it definitely wasn't the worst.  It was definitely worth watching just to see Jayne Mansfield before she was "Jayne Mansfield."

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Considering that fact that The Burglar had a shoestring budget, director Paul Wendkos brought a lot of flash to the production, clearly influenced by Orson Welles. On location shooting in Philly and Atlantic City is a great benefit, and the Steel Pier climax makes one think of the fun house ending to Lady from Shanghai.

While bad cop actor Stewart Bradley lacks, shall we say, subtle shadings to his jaw clenching performance, Dan Duryea, on the other hand, delivers a textbook illustration of minimalist acting as its finest as a middle aged crook with integrity. His character has a debt of honour from the past that will be prove to be his greatest burden. And a young Jayne Mansfield, in one of her first film roles, delivers a credible, sympathetic performance that makes you wonder what may have happened to her career if she had had more opportunities as a serious actress rather than becoming the often self promoted blonde bombshell for which she is remembered.

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This pic was a notch or so above the usual heist film, though the preparations for the heist

didn't take as long as it does in some of the other films with similar plots. And the criminals

in this caper were pretty stoopid. Take a sap and knock the old dame out so the burglery

won't be discovered right away. Ski masks, ever hear of them dumb dumb? And park farther

away from the scene of the crime, loser. And don't dis Capell's acting. He was the only guy

who kept his eye on the prize while the other two nitwits were busy playing with themselves.

Imagine Dan's surprise when Jayne told him she had had the hots for him for a long time.

Well, if she was so obsessed with him, why not stroll into his bedroom one night and let

her wares be on display. I'm sure he would have reacted favorably. But noooo. These clowns

got everything they deserved. Personally, I would have gone to Wildwood instead of Atlantic

City. It looked okay here, but by the early 1970s, what a dump. Last and least, don't be too

disappointed with Sister Sarah because she chugalugged from a beer bottle. Some of the

greatest seers of the 20th century did the same. 

 

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A Noir Lovers Christmas Present

 

List of French noir movies: UPDATED December 13, 2020, 4:30 pm Jean Cottraux 
This is a purely subjective selection of the French noir  films belonging to the pre classic period or the classic period with the addition of some transitional noir color movies.


Many forgotten good movies and directors have been added.


Marcel the Herbarium
Happiness (1934)

Robert Siodmak
Mister Flow (1936) : a curiosity of Siodmak’s French period : not very good

Sacha Guitry
Le roman d’un Tricheur (1936) : first use in the movie history of the voice over to tell a story
The Poison (1951)
The Life Of An Honest Man (1953)
Assassins & Thieves (1957)


Jean Boyer
Mitigating circumstances (1939)

Julien Duvivier
Grandpa the Moko (1936)
Ball notebook (1937): American remake of ′′ Ball notebook ′′
The end of the day (1939)
Lydia (1941)
Tales of Manhattan (1942)
Flesh and fantasy (1943)
The Impostor (1944)
Panic (1947): from Simenon ′′ Monsieur Hire ′′
Under the sky of Paris (1951)
Voici le temps des assassins (1956) : may be the best noir of Duvivier. Sadism, ****, and near incest…and a title borrowed from Arthur Rimbaud
The man with the raincoat (1957)
Marie-Octobre (1959) :  A Resistance movie but noirish in style

Marcel carné
The Mist Wharf (1938): Port of Shadows
Hotel du Nord (1938): from Eugene Dabit
The day rises (1939): Daybreak
The gates of the night (1946) (music Joseph Kosma: autumn leaves)
Therese Raquin (1953): from Emile Zola
Three bedrooms in Manhattan (1965): from Simenon

Christian-Jaque
The Angels of Hell (1939)
Santa Claus Assassination (1941): Who killed Santa Claus?
Hopeless Journey (1943)
A returnback (1946)
Lost memories (1950): Lost memories

Louis Daquin
The traveler of All Saints (1943): from Simenon

Albert Valentin
Life of pleasure (1944)

Jean Renoir
The crime of Mr. Lange (1936)
The Human Beast (1938)
The woman on the beach (1947)

Jean Dréville
Copying in accordance (1947)

Carlo Rim
The Flying Cabinet (1948)

Henri Decoin
Between eleven and midnight (1948)
The Truth About Baby Donge (1951)
Razzia on the chnouf (1955)
Why are you coming so late? (1958)

Henri Georges Clouzot
Assassin lives at 21 (1942)
The Raven (1941): the Raven
Goldsmith Wharf (1947)
The Wage of Fear (1952)
The Evil (1955)
The Truth (1960)

Jean Devaivre
The Lady of Eleven (1948)

Jean Delannoy
Obsession (1954)
Maigret sets a trap (1958)
Maigret and the Saint Fiacre case (1959)

Jacques Daniel Norman
120 Street of La Gare (1946)


Claude as much-Lara
Fric Frac (1939)
The Red Hostel (1951)
In case of misfortune (1958): from Simenon


Michel Gast
J’irai cracher sur vos tombes (1959) : from a novel by Vernon Sullivan AKA Boris Vian. The depiction of the USA lacks realism, but the story is good

Luis Saslavsky
Snow was dirty (1953): from Simenon

Jean Sacha
This man is dangerous (1953): Lemmy Caution

Bernard Borderie
The green kid of gray (1953): Lemmy Caution
Women swing (1954): Lemmy Caution
How She Is (1960): Lemmy Condition
Lemmy for the ladies (1962): Lemmy Condition
It's up to you to make cute (1963): Lemmy Caution
These ladies prefer mambo (1957)
Gorilla salutes you well (1958)
The Waltz of the Gorilla (1959)

John Berry
It's going to **** (1955)
I am a sentimental (1955)
To break everything (1968)


Chevalier stone
Do you get it? (1956): Lemmy Surety

Jean Laviron
Your devotee Blake (1954)
 

Henri Verneuil
The lovers of the Tagus (1955)
People Without Importance (1956)
The Clan of Sicilians (1959)
Melody in basement (1963)
My enemy's body (1976)
Fear on the city (1975)
I like Icare (1979)


Gilles Grangier
Gas-oil (1955)
Red is put on (1957)
Three days to live (1958)
Mess & Night (1958)
125 Montmartre Street (1959)
The cellar rebiffs (1961): parody
Maigret sees red (1963)

Victor Merenda
Sursis for a living (1959)


Denys of the Patelli èrere
Back crank (1957)


André Cayatte
We are all assassins (1952)
Trap for Cinderella (1965)


Michel Deville Michel
Lucky Jo (1964)


René Clément
Beyond the Grilles (1949) with Jean Gabin and the old port of Genova as background
Full sun (1960)
The passage of rain (1969)
The hare race through the fields (1972)


Jacques Deray
Symphony for a massacre (1963)
Borsalino (1970)
A man is dead (1972)
Borsalino and Co (1974)
A butterfly on the shoulder (1978)
Cop Story (1975)
We only die twice (1985)

Claire Devers
Max and Jeremiah (1992)
André Techiné
Baroque (1976)


Bertrand Tavernier
Torchon shot (1981): from Jim Thompson: ′′ Pop 1280 ′′
L. L 267 (1992)

Robert Enrico
Battery or face (1980)


Jose Giovanni
One-way trip (1970)
Last known home (1970)
The Scoumoune (1972)

Jacques Rouffio
Seven Deaths On Ordinance (1975).

Jean Herman
Goodbye friend (1968)
Jeff (1969)


Claude Miller
Custody (1981)
Deadly hike (1983)

Jean Becker
One named La Rocca (1961)
The murderous summer (1983)

Robert Hossein
You venom (1959)

Granier-Deferre stone
The Metamorphosis of Smokes (1965)
The Horse (1970)
The Race of Lords (1974)
Goodbye Chicken (1975)
A strange case (1981)

Yves Boisset
A condo (1970)
The jump of the angel (1971)
Judge Fayard (1977)
Blue as hell (1986)
Radio Raven (1989): remake of Nouzot's ′′ Raven ′′

Claude Chabrol
The cousins (1959)
The unfaithful woman (1968)
May the beast die (1969)
The Butcher (1970)
Just before dark (1971)
The Red Wedding (1973)
The Ghosts of the Hatter (1981)
Vinegar Chicken (1985)
The drunkenness of power (2006)
Bellamy (2008)


Franoisois Truffaut
Shoot the pianist (1960): shoot the pianist. From David Goodis
The Mississippi Mermaid (1969): from Cornell Woolrich
The bride was in black (1968): ′′ the bride wore black ′′ from Cornell Woolrich
Can't wait for Sunday (1983): from Charles Williams

Jean Luc Godard
Breathless (1960): Breathless
Alphaville, a strange adventure of Lemmy Caution (1965)

Louis Malle
Scaffold lift (1957): Elevator to the gallows (Miles Davis music)

Jacques Becker
Don't touch the Grisbi (1954): don't touch the loot (Jean **** music: the touch)
The Hole (1960)

Jules Dassin
Rifi in men (1955)

Raymond Bernard
The Seventh Heaven (1958)

Jean Pierre Melville
Bob the flambler (1955)
Two men in Manhattan (1959)
The Doulos (1962)
The eldest of the Ferchaux (1963)
The second breath (1966)
The Samurai (1967)
The Red Circle (1970)
A Cop (1970)

Edouard Molinaro
Back to the wall (1958)
Women disappear (1959)
A witness in the city (1959)

Claude Saute
All risk class (1960)


Alain Corneau
Police Python 357 (1976)
Black Series (1979)
The choice of weapons (1981)
The Cousin (1997)
The second breath (remake) (2007)
Jean Jacques Beinex
The moon in the gutter (1983): ′′ the moon in the gutter ′′ from David Goodis

Georges Lautner
The Seventh Jury (1962)
Les Uncles guns (1963): parody of ′′ don't touch the loot ′′
Death of a rotten (1977)

Roman Polanski
Monday of Faithful (1992)
The ghost writer (2010)

Paul Verhoeven
She (2016)

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24 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

A Noir Lovers Christmas Present

 

List of French noir movies: UPDATED December 13, 2020, 4:30 pm Jean Cottraux 
This is a purely subjective selection of the French noir  films belonging to the pre classic period or the classic period with the addition of some transitional noir color movies.


Many forgotten good movies and directors have been added.


Marcel the Herbarium
Happiness (1934)

Robert Siodmak
Mister Flow (1936) : a curiosity of Siodmak’s French period : not very good

Sacha Guitry
Le roman d’un Tricheur (1936) : first use in the movie history of the voice over to tell a story
The Poison (1951)
The Life Of An Honest Man (1953)
Assassins & Thieves (1957)


Jean Boyer
Mitigating circumstances (1939)

Julien Duvivier
Grandpa the Moko (1936)
Ball notebook (1937): American remake of ′′ Ball notebook ′′
The end of the day (1939)
Lydia (1941)
Tales of Manhattan (1942)
Flesh and fantasy (1943)
The Impostor (1944)
Panic (1947): from Simenon ′′ Monsieur Hire ′′
Under the sky of Paris (1951)
Voici le temps des assassins (1956) : may be the best noir of Duvivier. Sadism, ****, and near incest…and a title borrowed from Arthur Rimbaud
The man with the raincoat (1957)
Marie-Octobre (1959) :  A Resistance movie but noirish in style

Marcel carné
The Mist Wharf (1938): Port of Shadows
Hotel du Nord (1938): from Eugene Dabit
The day rises (1939): Daybreak
The gates of the night (1946) (music Joseph Kosma: autumn leaves)
Therese Raquin (1953): from Emile Zola
Three bedrooms in Manhattan (1965): from Simenon

Christian-Jaque
The Angels of Hell (1939)
Santa Claus Assassination (1941): Who killed Santa Claus?
Hopeless Journey (1943)
A returnback (1946)
Lost memories (1950): Lost memories

Louis Daquin
The traveler of All Saints (1943): from Simenon

Albert Valentin
Life of pleasure (1944)

Jean Renoir
The crime of Mr. Lange (1936)
The Human Beast (1938)
The woman on the beach (1947)

Jean Dréville
Copying in accordance (1947)

Carlo Rim
The Flying Cabinet (1948)

Henri Decoin
Between eleven and midnight (1948)
The Truth About Baby Donge (1951)
Razzia on the chnouf (1955)
Why are you coming so late? (1958)

Henri Georges Clouzot
Assassin lives at 21 (1942)
The Raven (1941): the Raven
Goldsmith Wharf (1947)
The Wage of Fear (1952)
The Evil (1955)
The Truth (1960)

Jean Devaivre
The Lady of Eleven (1948)

Jean Delannoy
Obsession (1954)
Maigret sets a trap (1958)
Maigret and the Saint Fiacre case (1959)

Jacques Daniel Norman
120 Street of La Gare (1946)


Claude as much-Lara
Fric Frac (1939)
The Red Hostel (1951)
In case of misfortune (1958): from Simenon


Michel Gast
J’irai cracher sur vos tombes (1959) : from a novel by Vernon Sullivan AKA Boris Vian. The depiction of the USA lacks realism, but the story is good

Luis Saslavsky
Snow was dirty (1953): from Simenon

Jean Sacha
This man is dangerous (1953): Lemmy Caution

Bernard Borderie
The green kid of gray (1953): Lemmy Caution
Women swing (1954): Lemmy Caution
How She Is (1960): Lemmy Condition
Lemmy for the ladies (1962): Lemmy Condition
It's up to you to make cute (1963): Lemmy Caution
These ladies prefer mambo (1957)
Gorilla salutes you well (1958)
The Waltz of the Gorilla (1959)

John Berry
It's going to **** (1955)
I am a sentimental (1955)
To break everything (1968)


Chevalier stone
Do you get it? (1956): Lemmy Surety

Jean Laviron
Your devotee Blake (1954)
 

Henri Verneuil
The lovers of the Tagus (1955)
People Without Importance (1956)
The Clan of Sicilians (1959)
Melody in basement (1963)
My enemy's body (1976)
Fear on the city (1975)
I like Icare (1979)


Gilles Grangier
Gas-oil (1955)
Red is put on (1957)
Three days to live (1958)
Mess & Night (1958)
125 Montmartre Street (1959)
The cellar rebiffs (1961): parody
Maigret sees red (1963)

Victor Merenda
Sursis for a living (1959)


Denys of the Patelli èrere
Back crank (1957)


André Cayatte
We are all assassins (1952)
Trap for Cinderella (1965)


Michel Deville Michel
Lucky Jo (1964)


René Clément
Beyond the Grilles (1949) with Jean Gabin and the old port of Genova as background
Full sun (1960)
The passage of rain (1969)
The hare race through the fields (1972)


Jacques Deray
Symphony for a massacre (1963)
Borsalino (1970)
A man is dead (1972)
Borsalino and Co (1974)
A butterfly on the shoulder (1978)
Cop Story (1975)
We only die twice (1985)

Claire Devers
Max and Jeremiah (1992)
André Techiné
Baroque (1976)


Bertrand Tavernier
Torchon shot (1981): from Jim Thompson: ′′ Pop 1280 ′′
L. L 267 (1992)

Robert Enrico
Battery or face (1980)


Jose Giovanni
One-way trip (1970)
Last known home (1970)
The Scoumoune (1972)

Jacques Rouffio
Seven Deaths On Ordinance (1975).

Jean Herman
Goodbye friend (1968)
Jeff (1969)


Claude Miller
Custody (1981)
Deadly hike (1983)

Jean Becker
One named La Rocca (1961)
The murderous summer (1983)

Robert Hossein
You venom (1959)

Granier-Deferre stone
The Metamorphosis of Smokes (1965)
The Horse (1970)
The Race of Lords (1974)
Goodbye Chicken (1975)
A strange case (1981)

Yves Boisset
A condo (1970)
The jump of the angel (1971)
Judge Fayard (1977)
Blue as hell (1986)
Radio Raven (1989): remake of Nouzot's ′′ Raven ′′

Claude Chabrol
The cousins (1959)
The unfaithful woman (1968)
May the beast die (1969)
The Butcher (1970)
Just before dark (1971)
The Red Wedding (1973)
The Ghosts of the Hatter (1981)
Vinegar Chicken (1985)
The drunkenness of power (2006)
Bellamy (2008)


Franoisois Truffaut
Shoot the pianist (1960): shoot the pianist. From David Goodis
The Mississippi Mermaid (1969): from Cornell Woolrich
The bride was in black (1968): ′′ the bride wore black ′′ from Cornell Woolrich
Can't wait for Sunday (1983): from Charles Williams

Jean Luc Godard
Breathless (1960): Breathless
Alphaville, a strange adventure of Lemmy Caution (1965)

Louis Malle
Scaffold lift (1957): Elevator to the gallows (Miles Davis music)

Jacques Becker
Don't touch the Grisbi (1954): don't touch the loot (Jean **** music: the touch)
The Hole (1960)

Jules Dassin
Rifi in men (1955)

Raymond Bernard
The Seventh Heaven (1958)

Jean Pierre Melville
Bob the flambler (1955)
Two men in Manhattan (1959)
The Doulos (1962)
The eldest of the Ferchaux (1963)
The second breath (1966)
The Samurai (1967)
The Red Circle (1970)
A Cop (1970)

Edouard Molinaro
Back to the wall (1958)
Women disappear (1959)
A witness in the city (1959)

Claude Saute
All risk class (1960)


Alain Corneau
Police Python 357 (1976)
Black Series (1979)
The choice of weapons (1981)
The Cousin (1997)
The second breath (remake) (2007)
Jean Jacques Beinex
The moon in the gutter (1983): ′′ the moon in the gutter ′′ from David Goodis

Georges Lautner
The Seventh Jury (1962)
Les Uncles guns (1963): parody of ′′ don't touch the loot ′′
Death of a rotten (1977)

Roman Polanski
Monday of Faithful (1992)
The ghost writer (2010)

Paul Verhoeven
She (2016)

What do these have to do with Noir Alley?

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One aspect of The Burglar I found interesting was the 15 minute national newscast.  I remember when the networks went to 30 minutes and Walter Cronkite supposedly said "There isn't 30 minutes worth of news every day" or something to that effect.

Prior to that, local news had 15 minutes for news, weather and sports.  Network had 15 for national and world.

Shouldn't the title actually be The Burglars?  While Duryea did the heavy lifting, the other two were accomplices and had significant parts of the movie.

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It's a trivial aspect of The Burglar, of course, but did anyone notice that, after watching the ten minute news reel at the beginning of the film, Dan Duryea walked out on a Laurel and Hardy film, Utopia? Mind you, he may have seen the film before and, truth be told, even L & H fans could probably barely get through it once.

burglar1.jpg

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On 12/10/2020 at 2:06 PM, ElCid said:

Vickers had a good performance in The Falcon in Mexico.  She was going by Martha MacVicar then.

 

8 minutes ago, TomJH said:

It's a trivial aspect of The Burglar, of course, but did anyone notice that, after watching the ten minute news reel at the beginning of the film, Dan Duryea walked out on a Laurel and Hardy film, Utopia? Mind you, he may have seen the film before and, truth be told, even L & H fans could probably barely get through it once.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ3r-YCSxDuCXclNktt6DN

it was filmed in the vicinity of Atlantic City and much of the surrounding terrain, salt marshes, back bays, remained unchanged to this day.

The Burglar (1957) — The Movie Database (TMDb)

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8 hours ago, ElCid said:

What do these have to do with Noir Alley?

Do I really have to explain it to you.....

The Title and a plethora of Films Noir to check out for those Afiio- Noir- dos and Noir-istas who don't mind reading subtitles,  for you ElCid a lump of coal.

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3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Do I really have to explain it to you.....

The Title and a plethora of Films Noir to check out for those Afiio- Noir- dos and Noir-istas who don't mind reading subtitles,  for you ElCid a lump of coal.

I realize we all tend to wander on this thread, but it is a very long list of foreign movies with no explanation of why it was posted on the NOIR ALLEY thread.

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1 minute ago, Cigarjoe cellph said:

Noir is noir sorry you don't get it what I'm doing I'd be fine with Eddie introducing a foreign Noir into Noir Alley every once in a while 

rather than doing repeats

Just saying that there is thread/forum specifically for Noir.  Maybe you should start a thread for foreign/noir?  Not against mentioning foreign films if they relate to Noir Alley.  But to post a very long, long list of them for no apparent reason as they relate to Noir Alley?  Sorry I don't get it.

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