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2 minutes ago, Dargo said:

I always kind'a felt this way about it too Cid...that is until I watched it again last Saturday night. 

It seemed to click more with me this time and as I more noticed how excellently this film was shot by director Robert Wise and his cimematographer Robert De Grasse.

(...and now I think those aspects of it alone have moved  it higher on my list of favorite Noirs ever made)

Walter Slezak also gives another fine performance in a noir film.    He was in The Fallen Sparrow,   Cornered,    and Born to Kill:

 From Wiki:  He also played a cheerfully corrupt and philosophical private detective in the film noir Born to Kill (1947) 

(of course nothing tops what he did in Bedtime for Bonzo!).

 

 

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8 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Walter Slezak also gives another fine performance in a noir film.    He was in The Fallen Sparrow,   Cornered,    and Born to Kill:

 From Wiki:  He also played a cheerfully corrupt and philosophical private detective in the film noir Born to Kill (1947) 

(of course nothing tops what he did in Bedtime for Bonzo!).

 

 

Ya know James, ever since I was a kid, I always looked forward to seeing ol' sleezy Slezak in a movie.

(...he seemed to always make whatever character he was playing an especially interesting one, and often steal the scenes he shared with the leads in the film)

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To me Born To Kill has some strange changes in atmosphere. It starts out with a fairly grisly

double murder, then morphs into a drawing room play and then back again to more killings.

Pretty good, though a bit one-track. I felt sorry for Cookie. He did all kinds of favors for 

Tierney and then as a reward Tierney kills him. Thanks a million, buddy. I got a kick out of the old

beer-loving floozy who hired Slezak. She was a riot. Slezak never looks as fit as he did playing

Willy in Lifeboat. Must have been those pills he had. Many years ago I saw Tierney in The Devil

Thumbs a Ride. He's pretty mean and crazy in that one too. That would be a good selection for

Noir Alley, though it only runs about an hour.

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Here is a film Eddie could show;  Universal's Black Angel (1946), with Dan Duryea,  June Vincent, Broderick Crawford and Peter Lorre.   Eddie does feature the film in his book Dark City.

Black Angel (1946) - Film Noir full movie | Dan Duryea, June Vincent,  Broderick Crawford full movies - YouTubeBlack Angel (1946) - IMDb

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On 1/24/2021 at 8:11 PM, Hoganman1 said:

I like fedoras and bow ties, but I'm old and a huge Bogart fan. I was just looking for a khaki trench coat online to wear with my fedora last week. They're actually not easy to find. 

Bogie is one of my favorites, but I never was much for wearing hats and never had a fedora. Also the

word sweatband is somewhat off putting. I would wear a regular tie if I had to, but otherwise not.

I find them too restricting. But to those who do, go for it.

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10 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Here is a film Eddie could show;  Universal's Black Angel (1946), with Dan Duryea,  June Vincent, Broderick Crawford and Peter Lorre.   Eddie does feature the film in his book Dark City.

Black Angel (1946) - Film Noir full movie | Dan Duryea, June Vincent,  Broderick Crawford full movies - YouTubeBlack Angel (1946) - IMDb

Well, its Universal, so that's a problem right there....

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22 hours ago, ElCid said:

 

Might try an Army surplus store for their nobody wanted these stocks.  Actually when I went into the Army in '69, the raincoat was a greenish trench coat.  Kept it in trunk of my car for decades for emergency use, but finally got rid of it.

I had one of those olive drab coats. It was discarded years ago.  I was actually drafted in 1972. Luckily, the Vietnam war ended while I was still in Basic Training. I do have a navy blue trench coat now, but it's not as cool as Bogie's khaki one.  I just watched THE NARROW MARGIN on MOVIES and Charles McGraw had the khaki trench coat and fedora look going too.  I'll keep searching. Surely, there's one out there somewhere. 

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

Well, its Universal, so that's a problem right there....

Yes,   odds are low,  but I'll keep pushing.    

EDDIE:  You have work to do;    Get management to pony up for some Universal noirs and feature those on Noir Alley.    If Universal staff don't play ball send your goons and convince them!!!          (ok just send them some ties and tell them they have to wear them 24 \7 until they lease TCM these films).

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I saw Black Angel a while back. Couldn't remember where. I thought it might have been on

a non-Noir Alley TCM slot, but as it's a Universal pic, I likely saw it on YT. A good variation on the

usual noir themes. 

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I am crossing my fingers that we'll finally see Christmas Holiday with Gene Kelly & Deanna Durbin this year.  It was on the schedule in 2019 before it was pulled, so there was a possibility at one time that TCM was going to show it.

I'd also love to see Beyond the Forest again.  That movie was a riot; but I know it is held up in some sort of copyright issue or something.

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18 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I am crossing my fingers that we'll finally see Christmas Holiday with Gene Kelly & Deanna Durbin this year.  It was on the schedule in 2019 before it was pulled, so there was a possibility at one time that TCM was going to show it.

I'd also love to see Beyond the Forest again.  That movie was a riot; but I know it is held up in some sort of copyright issue or something.

"Christmas Holiday" was a good movie.  I saw it twice on YouTube.  Gene Kelly like you've never seen him before...Deanna Durbin in a relatively non-warbling role...Gale Sondergaard at her usual good-quality standard of acting.

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23 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

THE BLUE DAHLIA (1946) is on (my) TCM on DEMAND ATM. 
It’s a pretty rarely showing , so I thought some of you might want an alert. Apologies to you Canadians if it’s not available for you.

Big fan of The Blue Dahlia.   One thing I like from a historical POV is the talk about music and the comment Buzz makes about monkey music.    Jazz music was clearly changing from the swing era to bebop,  with the latter getting,  the racial nickname monkey music.    In Blue Dahlia such music was a trigger to Buzz losing-it.   Sadly this theme was too often used to explain black Americans committing crimes.    

 Similar themes were pushed in films like Song of the Thin Man,  but here it was in a very positive light.     Such music was like Red-Bull today:  it caused a frenzy but all-for-just-a-good-time.       I purchased this vintage Time Magazine for the Olivia DeHavilland - The Snake Pit story but was rewarded with a music article about bebop.   Many racial undertones in the article but it is very enlightening of mainstream thinking in the late 40s.   It is from Dec 20th 1948.  

  TIME Magazine -- U.S. Edition -- December 20, 1948 Vol. LII No. 25

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On 12/14/2020 at 7:38 PM, Polly of the Precodes said:

For what it's worth, the 2020 edition of Muller's Noir City festival featured several foreign-language titles, including EL VAMPIRO NEGRO (Argentina, 1953; a localized version of M (1931)) and RAZZIA SUR LA CHNOUF (France, 1955). I'd love to see titles like this either on Noir Alley or TCM Imports.

To follow up my own post: On March 28, Noir Alley is showing PEPE LE MOKO (1937). It's in French, it predates 1940 (if you accept STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR (1940) as the first film noir), and its status as a proper film noir has been questioned. Does this foretell a Noir Alley series of non-English-language films?

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34 minutes ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

To follow up my own post: On March 28, Noir Alley is showing PEPE LE MOKO (1937). It's in French, it predates 1940 (if you accept STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR (1940) as the first film noir), and its status as a proper film noir has been questioned. Does this foretell a Noir Alley series of non-English-language films?

A non-English noir type film series would be great.   I have seen many of the French noir\crime films and of course would love to see them again,  but films from other countries would be great as well.     I'm OK with subtitles since I married an Italian,  that is fluent in  French as well,  so I'm use to subtitles.     

 

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13 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

To follow up my own post: On March 28, Noir Alley is showing PEPE LE MOKO (1937). It's in French, it predates 1940 (if you accept STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR (1940) as the first film noir), and its status as a proper film noir has been questioned. Does this foretell a Noir Alley series of non-English-language films?

That would be ok with me. The more the merrier.

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On 1/27/2021 at 8:17 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Big fan of The Blue Dahlia.   One thing I like from a historical POV is the talk about music and the comment Buzz makes about monkey music.    Jazz music was clearly changing from the swing era to bebop,  with the latter getting,  the racial nickname monkey music.    In Blue Dahlia such music was a trigger to Buzz losing-it.   Sadly this theme was too often used to explain black Americans committing crimes.   Similar themes were pushed in films like Song of the Thin Man,  but here it was in a very positive light.     Such music was like Red-Bull today:  it caused a frenzy but all-for-just-a-good-time.       I purchased this vintage Time Magazine for the Olivia DeHavilland - The Snake Pit story but was rewarded with a music article about bebop.   Many racial undertones in the article but it is very enlightening of mainstream thinking in the late 40s.   It is from Dec 20th 1948. 

Thank you! That helps me appreciate the film a little more. (I did notice the whole "monkey music" thing though!)

ps- it was fun to hear JOHNNY MERCER'S ACC-EN-TUATE- THE POSITIVE sung at a party scene in THE BLUE DAHLIA.

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On 1/27/2021 at 12:57 AM, speedracer5 said:

Id also love to see Beyond the Forest again.  That movie was a riot; but I know it is held up in some sort of copyright issue or something.

it was, but I NOT ONLY purchased it on AMAZON PRIME (for $2.99), IT'S NOW FREE on AMAZON PRIME, and I rewatched it just this past Holiday season, CACKLING LIKE MARGARET HAMILTON the ENTIRE TIME.

God I LOVE "BEYOND THE FOREST."

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

it was, but I NOT ONLY purchased it on AMAZON PRIME (for $2.99), IT'S NOW FREE on AMAZON PRIME, and I rewatched it just this past Holiday season, CACKLING LIKE MARGARET HAMILTON the ENTIRE TIME.

God I LOVE "BEYOND THE FOREST."

YOU CAN BUY IT ON DVD NOW?????????

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10 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Thank you! That helps me appreciate the film a little more. (I did notice the whole "monkey music" thing though!)

ps- it was fun to hear JOHNNY MERCER'S ACC-EN-TUATE- THE POSITIVE sung at a party scene in THE BLUE DAHLIA.

At the jazz forum there is a big debate about bebops place in musical history.   In many ways the music was black-America's protest music;   white Americans loved black musicians but only if they were tame and knew their place.     Bebop was their way of fully expressing themselves beyond the confines of what white society imposed on them.   AND,  it musically was complex and just as innovative as the great music that came from the white Euro-centric classical composers,  causing many at the time to push back by mocking it as monkey music - music fit for animals not sophisticated human beings.      

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7 minutes ago, Hibi said:

YOU CAN BUY IT ON DVD NOW?????????

No, sadly.

sorry to get your hopes up.

I own a DIGITAL COPY which I can watch on my TV through amazon prime.

(it's sort of like when you have something stored on DVR)

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

No, sadly.

sorry to get your hopes up.

I own a DIGITAL COPY which I can watch on my TV through amazon prime.

(it's sort of like when you have something stored on DVR)

Oh, ok. I knew it was too good to believe.....

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18 hours ago, mr6666 said:

 

Well worth seeing. It has almost nothing in common with Robert Siodmak's 1940s film except the same title. And there are killers in it. I saw this at the last TCM Film Festival in 2019 just after I'd seen Hello, Dolly! Not exactly the perfect double feature.

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