Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

23 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

That had me scratching my head too. Sure, she was a reliable star, but she was never a big/huge movie star.

Her biggest role in the 1970s was the Police Woman TV show. I think Lee Marvin became a star in the later

1960s starting with The Dirty Dozen. This movie reminds me a bit of those Don Knotts' 1960s Universal films.

Kind of low-budget movies with lots of recognizable TV stars. Obviously the themes were a lot different. It

would have been perfect if the final shootout had taken place at The Brady Bunch house, though I suppose

that would have been an anachronism. 

I liked Police Woman, but always was amused that the guys ended up bailing Angie out in most episodes.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

It's pretty clear to me that Reagan was not a big star. I think the only other films of his I've seen are KNUTE ROCKNE and DARK VICTORY. I missed BEDTIME FOR BONZO,

Reagan is actually pretty good in Kings Row, probably his best work. Not bad in The Hasty Heart, either, both good films. But if you're suggesting that there are a lot of actors of the same period you prefer, me too.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Hibi said:

 

Yeah, right. Where does Eddie come off saying Angie Dickenson was A HUGE STAR??? She was NEVER a HUGE star!

I believe the theater people voted her #1 female star of the year when Dressed to Kill was released, a big hit at the box office. She never had a big follow-up movie, however. A huge star she wasn't, especially given how attractive she was and the fact that she actually could act.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, ElCid said:

I liked Police Woman, but always was amused that the guys ended up bailing Angie out in most episodes.

True.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, kingrat said:

I believe the theater people voted her #1 female star of the year when Dressed to Kill was released, a big hit at the box office. She never had a big follow-up movie, however. A huge star she wasn't, especially given how attractive she was and the fact that she actually could act.

Yeah, but the film wasn't a hit because of her participation in it. Anyone could've played the part. She just lucked out there. She exits the film quite early.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked this version of The Killers well enough (I think it might have been the third time I've ever watched it over the years), but no, there's no way this version even comes close to the quality of the 1946 version.

First, IMO, Robert Siodmak's direction in the '46 version is far superior to Don Siegel's in the latter. And, so is the cinematography.

Secondly, I've never EVER found Angie Dickenson to be all that attractive. Or, perhaps to paraphrase Sen. Lloyd Bentsen's famous line, "I know Ava Gardner, and Angie, you're no Ava Gardner". (sorry, MissW  ;) )  And besides, I've always loved the final scene in the original and were Ava pleads not for her life (as Angie does), but for her dying sugar daddy to exonerate her to the police as she's being taken away by them. The remake in my view contains too much unnecessary bloodshed, and which I think lessens the impact of the film's conclusion and seems almost too easy and simple of an ending for this story.

Now, being the gearhead that I am, I DID enjoy looking at all the classic race and passenger cars in the remake and which of course served the purpose of showing Cassavettes as a race car driver whose services as such would be of later use in the plot in this version.

(...but other than that, nope, its "2.5 to 3-star" rating as compared to the original's 4-star rating is and continues to be perfectly understandable in my view)

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Criterion DVD release of both versions of The Killers features an interesting 2002 interview that Clu Gulaher had about the making of his version.

The film was originally filmed for television but eventually got a theatrical release instead after it was deemed to be too violent for home viewing. Gulager had great respect for Lee Marvin as an actor though he called him the most insecure actor he ever met. Still, he thought he gave a great performance in the film. He also said that Marvin arrived hours late, drunk as a skunk for his final scenes in the film when his character is wounded and dies and what we see on screen is, indeed, a drunken actor in those final scenes.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, TomJH said:

The Criterion DVD release of both versions of The Killers features an interesting 2002 interview that Clu Gulaher had about the making of his version.

The film was originally filmed for television but eventually got a theatrical release instead after it was deemed to be too violent for home viewing. Gulager had great respect for Lee Marvin as an actor though he called him the most insecure actor he ever met. Still, he thought he gave a great performance in the film. He also said that Marvin arrived hours late, drunk as a skunk for his final scenes in the film when his character is wounded and dies and what we see on screen is, indeed, a drunken actor in those final scenes.

 

Well, maybe Lee thought being drunk would add to his character's mortally wounded death throe scenes, Tom? And in fact, and now that you brought this up, I think it did.

(...of course this now brings to mind the old story about what Olivier was reported to have said to Duston 'Hoffman during the filming of Marathon Man, and after Hoffman reported to the set after purposely staying up all night the night prior with no sleep...after Olivier querried him as to why he did this prior to their scene being filmed and Hoffman saying it was because he wanted to appear as disheveled and tired as he could, Olivier supposedly replied with, "Why not try acting? It's much easier.") 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Well, maybe Lee thought being drunk would add to his character's mortally wounded death throe scenes, Tom? And in fact, and now that you brought this up, I think it did.

(...of course this now brings to mind the old story about what Olivier was reported to have said to Duston 'Hoffman during the filming of Marathon Man, and after Hoffman reported to the set after purposely staying up all night the night prior with no sleep...after Olivier querried him as to why he did this prior to their scene being filmed and Hoffman saying it was because he wanted to appear as disheveled and tired as he could, Olivier supposedly replied with, "Why not try acting? It's much easier.") 

Perhaps so but the way Gulager saw it, since it was  Marvin's last scenes to be filmed, Marvin showed up drunk because he could get away with it. And he did.

Having said that, though, Lee is excellent in those scenes so maybe his drunken state did add to the performance.

A couple of years later, though, Marvin drunkenness during the making of The Professionals back fired on him when Burt Lancaster picked him up and dangled him over the edge of a cliff, threatening to drop him off it the next time he showed up drunk. Marvin, I understand, was sober during the making of the rest of the film.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, ElCid said:

I liked Police Woman, but always was amused that the guys ended up bailing Angie out in most episodes.

I didn't watch a lot of TV back then, so I never saw Police Woman. Bailing out Angie Dickinson. Seems

like a no-brainer. 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Perhaps so but the way Gulager saw it, since it was  Marvin's last scenes to be filmed, Marvin showed up drunk because he could get away with it. And he did.

Having said that, though, Lee is excellent in those scenes so maybe his drunken state did add to the performance.

A couple of years later, though, Marvin drunkenness during the making of The Professionals back fired on him when Burt Lancaster picked him up and dangled him over the edge of a cliff, threatening to drop him off it the next time he showed up drunk. Marvin, I understand, was sober during the making of the rest of the film.

Sounds like a story Marvin himself might've told to Johnny Carson during one of his appearances on the old Tonight Show.

He usually was a pretty entertaining guest and often told these kind of tales of stories about himself and his movie co-stars "exploits" such as this, if you recall.

(...always loved the one about how he was awarded the Purple Heart during the Battle of Saipan, and where, "anatomically speaking", he was wounded by gunfire)

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Dargo said:

Sounds like a story Marvin himself might've told to Johnny Carson during one of his appearances on the old Tonight Show.

He usually was a pretty entertaining guest and often told these kind of tales of stories about himself and his movie co-stars "exploits" such as this, if you recall.

(...always loved the one about how he was awarded the Purple Heart during the Battle of Saipan, and where, "anatomically speaking", he was wounded by gunfire)

Well, Dargo, I admit, that it does sound like a colourful Hollywood tale. But if it did happen, I figure it could be seen as Lancaster's way of doing tribute to the scene in which Marvin hung Angie out that window in The Killers.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Hibi said:

Yeah, but [DRESSED TO KILL]  wasn't a hit because of [ANGIE DICKINSON'S] participation in it. Anyone could've played the part. She just lucked out there. She exits the film quite early.

I know what you mean here, but I'm not sure anyone anyone could've played it...like, I don't see DIVINE or LIZA MINELLI or PAT AST in the part

ALTHOUGH....

As someone who has actually seen DRESSED TO KILL, I have to say any one of those three would've made the film a helluva lot more watchable.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I know what you mean here, but I'm not sure anyone anyone could've played it...like, I don't see DIVINE or LIZA MINELLI or PAT AST in the part

ALTHOUGH....

As someone who has actually seen DRESSED TO KILL, I have to say any one of those three would've made the film a helluva lot more watchable.

Pat Ast. I'd forgotten she ever existed. Thanks for jogging my memory. Now Divine in the role would've been a HOOT! LOL.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Hibi said:

Pat Ast. I'd forgotten she ever existed. Thanks for jogging my memory. Now Divine in the role would've been a HOOT! LOL.

DIVINE in ANY ROLE could save ANY FILM.

(A bold statement, I know, but one I stand by. )

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

MOVIES Network showed THE LAS VEGAS STORY last Thursday and I recorded it to watch later. It's not bad and has some great character actors. It's a Howard Hughes project so of course Jane Russell is the star along with Victor Mature and Vincent Price. Hoagy Carmichael also has a pretty big roll playing his usual character. It seems he is always an easy going piano player in a bar. The ending is a little too cheesy for a true noir, but it's worth watching on a cold rainy Monday. I guess one of the few positives of living through COVID is seeing all the old movies from the 40s and 50s. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Killer That Stalked New York (next Sunday) and Native Son (Feb. 21) are Noir Alley premieres, and in fact I think Native Son is a TCM premiere, period. 

Odds Against Tomorrow (Feb. 28) is a repeat.  For whatever reason there's no Noir Alley on Valentine's Day,  though on second thought I think I can guess the reason.....😎

Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, AndyM108 said:

The Killer That Stalked New York (next Sunday) and Native Son (Feb. 21) are Noir Alley premieres, and in fact I think Native Son is a TCM premiere, period. 

Odds Against Tomorrow (Feb. 28) is a repeat.  For whatever reason there's no Noir Alley on Valentine's Day,  though on second thought I think I can guess the reason.....😎

Sorry, Andy,  I could be mistaken, but I'm fairly sure "The Killer that Stalked New York"  is  a Noir Alley repeat. I think Eddie  aired it a couple of years or so ago.

Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, AndyM108 said:

The Killer That Stalked New York (next Sunday) and Native Son (Feb. 21) are Noir Alley premieres, and in fact I think Native Son is a TCM premiere, period. 

Odds Against Tomorrow (Feb. 28) is a repeat.  For whatever reason there's no Noir Alley on Valentine's Day,  though on second thought I think I can guess the reason.....😎

Eddie should have found a noir about obsessive love or something, like Leave Her to Heaven. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

MOVIES Network showed THE LAS VEGAS STORY last Thursday and I recorded it to watch later. It's not bad and has some great character actors. It's a Howard Hughes project so of course Jane Russell is the star along with Victor Mature and Vincent Price. Hoagy Carmichael also has a pretty big roll playing his usual character. It seems he is always an easy going piano player in a bar. The ending is a little too cheesy for a true noir, but it's worth watching on a cold rainy Monday. I guess one of the few positives of living through COVID is seeing all the old movies from the 40s and 50s. 

The Las Vegas Story is one of my favorites.  The whole cast did a good job as did the screenwriter and director.  When I re-watch it, I tend to fast forward through the fight scene at the end - too long.

As for The Killer that Stalked New York, for those who may not know, the killer is a disease.

Link to post
Share on other sites

While I enjoyed the 1964 Killers well enough nothing in the film for me comes close to the riveting power of the first ten minutes of the 1946 version when the two hit men (Charles McGraw, William Conrad) arrive in the small town searching for their target. A combination of strong black and white photography and the ominous sounds of Miklos Roza's musical score, with its famous da-de-da dum theme, tells you that something terrible is about to happen.

And then comes our first sighting of Burt Lancaster, lying in a bed but refusing to take cover when he hears that two killers are looking for him. Within minutes, Lancaster hears the sounds of their steps slowly approaching his room, with his door suddenly bursting open as the two gunmen empty their guns into him, flashes from their weapons reflecting light on their faces. The scene ends with a shot of Lancaster's hand limply falling to the side of the bed.

It is one of the most justly famous opening sequences of any film. While some may argue that nothing else in the film matches that opening (and I would agree with them) the cast's performances and tension achieved through Robert Siodmak's direction contribute to make this one of the most memorable excursions down a dark noir screen ally. Poor Lancaster, trapped in an obsession with a woman who finally proves to be unworthy of his devotion, beauteous Ava Gardner, a sensual force of destruction for weak men, great journeyman actor Edmond O'Brien who is in many ways the real star of this film as he investigates the murder of a boxer, and sleek, duplicitous Albert Dekker, mastermind behind the robbery that brings most of the cast together. These four actors all make memorable turns here.

I don't know what Ernest Hemingway thought of the '46 version. Only the opening ten minutes accurately reflects the entirety of his short story, to the extent that they even used some of his dialogue. The rest of the film was pure Hollywood invention in a production I regard as one of the key illustrations of the power of noir.

MV5BMDRkNzMxNGMtMzFiZi00ZTIyLWIyYWUtMDM3

Poor Ole. He's doomed from the first moment he sees her but it's not difficult to understand why.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, wbogacz said:

Some people can really roll a role into a career.

Hey. I get it. I'm old. My fifth grade English teacher would smack me on the knuckles for typing roll instead of role. Anyway, Hoagy was great; don't you think?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...