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Tonight on MOVIES-TV Thursday noir,  is The Big Combo;  gritty hardnosed 1955 noir with a fine cast (even Cornel Wilde does good here),   especially the supporting players.  E.g. Helen Walker in her last film,   the gay henchman Lee Van Cleef and Earl Holliman,   John Hoyt and Ted de Corsia.    Very noir visuals as done by John Alton and music by David Raksin (known for Laura).

Image result for the big combo

 

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The Big Combo is the film that Cornel Wilde is promoting in his guest appearance on I Love Lucy.  I haven't seen this film yet, but I have it on my DVR.

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20 hours ago, TomJH said:

I agree. I think Ava brought genuine vulnerability to her role as an aging party girl who finds love one last time. I also thought she and Gregory Peck had very strong chemistry in this film, as they had in Snows of Kilimanjaro.

bc7cac2e0f6bde4dd4916142262ea1c9.gif

I can never hear "Waltzing Matilda" without thinking of them.

 

Same here. Every time I here that song I think of that scene.

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On 2/4/2021 at 12:39 PM, Dargo said:

First here, Liz Taylor always seemed to me to be in both looks and personally as "too delicate" for want of a better description here.

Secondly, sure, Gene Tierney had that sexy as all hell little overbite, but in my view again, she also came across as just a bit "too delicate". Goddard was an attractive lady to be sure and maybe a "9", and while Jane Russell certainly could never be called "too delicate" and exuded an earthiness about her in all of her films, sorry, that strange looking nose of hers has always turned me off a bit.

Aaaah, but now Ava, she had it all. Classic beautiful features AND that same smoldering and sultry "earthiness" which Jane Russell had.

(...and yeah, I think Ava's little chin clef is sexy as hell too...so sue me!!!)  ;)

LOL

Well, Jean's "little" overbite was apparently so little that I never noticed it( and still don't. )  And Monroe( which I type out as to not get her confused with the other MM here, who's probably nowhere near as gorgeous)  Would IMO  have been just as gorgeous even with her natural hair color, which appeared to have been some shade of Auburn.   And while on the subject of gorgeous,   Let's not forget...

No little overbite, no weak chin, no bleached hair,  just all 100% HOT BABE!

Sepiatone

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I've noticed on the sidebar of YT loads of celebrities with the same The Life and Sad Ending of.....

Some may have had sad endings, but for others I wonder if their sad ending was getting old and

dying, which happens to lots of folks. 

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A clip from The Killer That Stalked New York showing the Chatham Square Station 3rd Ave el for transit nerds

The el ran down St. James Place here. The cemetery is the historic First Shearith Israel Graveyard, dating to the 17th century.  At the :43 mark St. James Elementary School (now Transfiguration Upper School) is at center, where Gov. Alfred E. Smith received his only formal education, and beyond the school are the unfinished towers of the housing project that bears his name. Also, the actor is this particular scene is Richard Egan.

The view starts on the EL platform looking south on the northbound track side of the 5 story high single island platform Chatham Square Station  of the South Ferry Branch of the IRT 3rd Avenue EL.  The 2nd Ave. EL had two tracks and a wider single island platform below the one in the 1950 movie scene...that platform and line abandoned June 1942,  8 years earlier.

She walks to the opposite side of the platform and boards a southbound to South Ferry 3rd Ave EL local of MUDC Class (Open end-platform gate cars rebuilt in 1923 with enclosed end platform vestibules with sliding outside-hung doors ).  The South Ferry branch closed at the end of 1950 shortly after this movie  was made -- closing in Dec. 1950 and was demolished / removed from the south end of the station platform seen in the movie, to South Ferry terminal..  The two tracks ended at the south end of this platform, 5 stories high,  with only two flimsy track-end- bumpers !!

The City Hall Branch of the EL had a close by  separate 2 island platforms Chatham Square Station which served both 2nd & 3rd Ave EL trains --- the 3rd Ave line using the northerly one platform and 2 tracks.

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Question here regarding "Killer That Stalked New York" - When exactly did smallpox vaccinations start being required before starting public school? I was born in 1958, and I was vaccinated in 1964.   So in the 1940s this wasn't one of the vaccinations required to enter public school? Because the film makes it sound like the entire city of New York was unvaccinated. Just wondering, since the vaccine for smallpox had been around since the 1800s.

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THE KILLER THAT STALKED NEW YORK was eerie when one considers where we are today.  While  the film is not a memorable noir, having a disease as the ultimate villain was an interesting plot line.  I have one quick question. Was the Customs Agent's partner played by Richard Egan? He wasn't listed on Wiki and if he was in the credits I missed it. 

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43 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

THE KILLER THAT STALKED NEW YORK was eerie when one considers where we are today.  While  the film is not a memorable noir, having a disease as the ultimate villain was an interesting plot line.  I have one quick question. Was the Customs Agent's partner played by Richard Egan? He wasn't listed on Wiki and if he was in the credits I missed it. 

Yes he was. I noticed him too.  He had an uncredited role. I just loved all of the future stars and the character actors in this one.  That's two big stars of 50s Universal - Dorothy Malone and Richard Egan - in this film.  Somebody said that four of the players in this one guest starred on Star Trek. I can't remember where I saws that.

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Dorothy Malone was as smirky and insinuating in those early scenes as she is in The Big Sleep, although according to the story she's just a hard-working nurse. She does just enough that you can't take your eyes off her in those scenes. I'm glad she finally had an opportunity to play bigger roles.

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Despite being filmed in NY, that cliff hanger ending used a downtown LA backdrop. (am sure the ledge was a set, they wouldn't let their stars up on some building ledge) The Cozy theater in the distance was in downtown LA. Not sure why they did this (maybe money) but surprised Eddie didn't mention this. I'd seen the film before and liked it, but liked it less this time around.  It did have relevance with what's happening today, but saw more of its flaws. And vaccinating so many people in that short a time was laughable. Evelyn sure lasted a long time compared to others in the film! (and looked dreadful in the process!)

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36 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Despite being filmed in NY, that cliff hanger ending used a downtown LA backdrop. (am sure the ledge was a set, they wouldn't let their stars up on some building ledge) The Cozy theater in the distance was in downtown LA. Not sure why they did this (maybe money) but surprised Eddie didn't mention this. I'd seen the film before and liked it, but liked it less this time around.  It did have relevance with what's happening today, but saw more of its flaws. And vaccinating so many people in that short a time was laughable. Evelyn sure lasted a long time compared to others in the film! (and looked dreadful in the process!)

Keyes got divorced the same year the film was made,  1950;   Huston treated her very badly.    So that dreadful look wasn't only due to make-up.

It would be great if Noir Alley showed the 1947, Dick Powell noir Johnny O'Clock.    This is a Columbia film,   with a fine supporting cast of Thomas Gomez,  Nina Foch,  Ellen Drew,  and Lee J. Cobb (who as the cop,  doesn't overdo it like he tends to do).

Film Poster for Johnny O'Clock.jpg

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For the first time, I saw Side Street with Farley Granger on Movies!   Shot on location, it was fun to see what parts of NYC looked like in 1949.   Excellent black & white cinematography by Joseph Ruttenberg.  Supporting cast included Jean Hagen, James Craig, Charles McGraw, Adele Jergens and Cathy O'Donnell as his pregnant wife.  Ends with wild chase finale.  

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Did anyone catch Ben M's outro of the movie that preceded last night's  Noir Alley? He said that he wouldn't be watching Noir Alley and/or that he'd never watch Noir Alley. I'm assuming this is an in-joke that's escaped me....does anyone know what that was about?

 

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Why would the title THE KILLER THAT STALKED NEW YORK be considered grammatically incorrect by some?

(in re: EDDIE’s intro)

Beats  me! I didn't get that either.

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It was funny about Keyes looking so badly, they used gauzy filters on her close ups! LOL. Almost like they were concerned about how she looked!

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Why would the title THE KILLER THAT STALKED NEW YORK be considered grammatically incorrect by some?

(in re: EDDIE’s intro)

I believe grammatically if the 'killer' was a person, you would say 'The killer who stalked New York', but as Eddie pointed out, in this case the killer was a thing (being the disease), so 'The killer that' is correct.

(I wouldn't have thought about it if Eddie hadn't mentioned it.)

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8 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

I believe grammatically if the 'killer' was a person, you would say 'The killer who stalked New York', but as Eddie pointed out, in this case the killer was a thing (being the disease), so 'The killer that' is correct.

(I wouldn't have thought about it if Eddie hadn't mentioned it.)

AHA! 
thank you! 
As a grammar pedant, that was bugging me.

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14 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

I believe grammatically if the 'killer' was a person, you would say 'The killer who stalked New York', but as Eddie pointed out, in this case the killer was a thing (being the disease), so 'The killer that' is correct.

(I wouldn't have thought about it if Eddie hadn't mentioned it.)

Remember when Judy Garland's song from A Star Is Born "The Man That Got Away" was criticized for being grammatically incorrect?  When asked why, lyricist Ira Gershwin said that it sounded better than "the man who got away."   I agree.

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On 2/7/2021 at 11:51 AM, LsDoorMat said:

Question here regarding "Killer That Stalked New York" - When exactly did smallpox vaccinations start being required before starting public school? I was born in 1958, and I was vaccinated in 1964.   So in the 1940s this wasn't one of the vaccinations required to enter public school? Because the film makes it sound like the entire city of New York was unvaccinated. Just wondering, since the vaccine for smallpox had been around since the 1800s.

I remember getting one when I was a child, but dont remember my age. Can't believe this wasnt a school requirement back then. I don't remember if it was for me.

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On 2/7/2021 at 7:19 PM, Arbogast said:

 

Did anyone catch Ben M's outro of the movie that preceded last night's  Noir Alley? He said that he wouldn't be watching Noir Alley and/or that he'd never watch Noir Alley. I'm assuming this is an in-joke that's escaped me....does anyone know what that was about?

 

Ben likes to make ridiculous comments about Eddie and Noir Alley as sort of a running joke, since he’s typically doing the lead-in movie prior to Noir Alley each Saturday.

In this case, he was talking about Young Frankenstein being the third-highest grossing film of 1974 (as compared to Blazing Saddles, also released that year), and said it was “coming up next on Noir Alley.”  Then he said something like, “I’m kidding, I’ve never seen Noir Alley, and I never will.”

This is all just dumb humor to give us a laugh before Eddie takes over.

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