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On 2/7/2021 at 10:51 AM, LsDoorMat said:

Question here regarding "Killer That Stalked New York" - When exactly did smallpox vaccinations start being required before starting public school? I was born in 1958, and I was vaccinated in 1964.   So in the 1940s this wasn't one of the vaccinations required to enter public school? Because the film makes it sound like the entire city of New York was unvaccinated. Just wondering, since the vaccine for smallpox had been around since the 1800s.

That's interesting because I was vaccinated for smallpox half- hazardly in 1963.  A neighbor's dog bit me and I had to have a tetanus shot. Then the doctor demanded that I have a smallpox vaccination. But I was already in school and nobody in the school district cared at all.

What's more, I can remember that we had voluntary tuberculosis tests and polio vaccinations. But everything was voluntary. You had to have your parents sign for it, but it didn't make any difference whether you had it or not for your attendance.

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I watched this video from Vegas Film Critic about Native Son with Jacqueline and Eddie after posting. It is much longer than the intro, so they can go into more detail. They even talk about how it was difficult to do this intro because they felt that there were elements of the movie that needed to be explained for people to understand what they were watching.

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Odds Against Tomorrow

Noir, then and Now

Then (1958-9) - New York Central RS-3 Alco Diesel Switcher rolling North through the 7th & Warren St. intersection, Hudson, NY

FbqjeG2.jpg

Now, I took this December 21, 2018 a CXS SD40-2 (EMD) going South through same intersection.

JfcgFOo.jpg

they removed the stop lights, rail road crossing gates, and the old bus terminal is a store but everything else is essentially the same.

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7 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Odds Against Tomorrow

Noir, then and Now

Then (1958-9) - New York Central RS-3 Alco Diesel Switcher rolling North through the 7th & Warren St. intersection, Hudson, NY

FbqjeG2.jpg

Now, I took this December 21, 2018 a CXS SD40-2 (EMD) going South through same intersection.

JfcgFOo.jpg

they removed the stop lights, rail road crossing gates, and the old bus terminal is a store but everything else is essentially the same.

All these decades later and there are still poles with wires. 

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Odds Against Tomorrow — Loved the bar scene with Trapper John. Ryan is so intense. He exudes this inner rage that is so “real”, and he never makes a false move . All the actors are superb.  There a few lines of dialogue I thought were affected but not many. I do object to the end of mentioned bar scene. Ryan leaves his glass of beer.  Earle would not have left his glass of beer.  It always bugs me in movies when someone leaves a drink unfinished, especially in a bar.

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2 hours ago, Thompson said:

 It always bugs me in movies when someone leaves a drink unfinished, especially in a bar.

Yes! Especially when they've literally just ordered the drink.  They get their drink, take one sip, throw a dollar on the table and leave.  Or they order food, take one bite, and leave.

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On 2/26/2021 at 12:47 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

All these decades later and there are still poles with wires. 

My neighborhood has poles with wires. 

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2 hours ago, Thompson said:

Odds Against Tomorrow — Loved the bar scene with Trapper John. Ryan is so intense. He exudes this inner rage that is so “real”, and he never makes a false move . All the actors are superb.  There a few lines of dialogue I thought were affected but not many. I do object to the end of mentioned bar scene. Ryan leaves his glass of beer.  Earle would not have left his glass of beer.  It always bugs me in movies when someone leaves a drink unfinished, especially in a bar.

Have always found this silly.  I have never been to a bar or restaurant where I or anyone I was with has left an unfinished alcohol drink.  Nor have I even seen it done.  But it happens in movies and on TV shows all the time.

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15 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Have always found this silly.  I have never been to a bar or restaurant where I or anyone I was with has left an unfinished alcohol drink.  Nor have I even seen it done.  But it happens in movies and on TV shows all the time.

I've seen people leave half a pint of beer or half a glass of wine and I hate it.  I can't even bring myself to spit the wine out in the bucket during wine tasting. 

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I must say Hudson, NY looked like a pretty dreary place, though that may have partially been the

time of night and the photography. I liked the idea of three NYC dudes going up the river to rob

a bank in some hick town. And all that detailed planning gone down the drain just because of a

raffle ticket. For shame.

If Miss Kitty had found a way to recycle all the hardly touched beers (though the rotgut whiskey was

usually finished) in the Long Branch she could have made a killing. 

 

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Unlikely this will happen but I'd love to see Noir Alley program some European noir. Belmont, Delon, Jean Gabin, Christian Marquand and Lino Ventura all made outstanding noir films in the 1950s. 

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9 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I must say Hudson, NY looked like a pretty dreary place, though that may have partially been the

time of night and the photography. I liked the idea of three NYC dudes going up the river to rob

a bank in some hick town. And all that detailed planning gone down the drain just because of a

raffle ticket. For shame.

If Miss Kitty had found a way to recycle all the hardly touched beers (though the rotgut whiskey was

usually finished) in the Long Branch she could have made a killing. 

 

Gunsmoke!! Only Louie (well, some others too) ever showed any effects from the whiskey.  Certainly Miss Kitty and her girls never did.  Another anomaly in the Trapper John bar scene is Ryan pouring himself a shot of Two Roses Bourbon from the bottle which is on the bar.  In Gunsmoke, quite okay, but I don’t think that was allowed in 1959.  I do like the showing of the brand name of whiskey, Two Roses. Brings to mind J.T.S. Brown - Fast Eddy’s drink of choice in The Hustler.

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When Earle walks into the bar the bartender asks if he would like the usual. Ryan puts up two fingers, which was interesting. The two did not mean two of the same, it meant a shot and a beer back, understood by the bartender.  So yeah,  Wise should have caught that almost full glass of beer being left on the bar.

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9 hours ago, jameselliot said:

Unlikely this will happen but I'd love to see Noir Alley program some European noir. Belmont, Delon, Jean Gabin, Christian Marquand and Lino Ventura all made outstanding noir films in the 1950s. 

Noir Alley has scheduled Pepe le Moko (1937) for March 27/28. Maybe this is a harbinger of more non-U.S. noir to come? Also, TCM Imports has previously screened some films in this niche.

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I really like ODDS AGAINST TOMORROW. Eddie mentioned it was one of the last B&W noirs of the era.  I thought Belafonte, Ryan and Begley were all great.  I hadn't seen that much of Robert Ryan until I started watching Noir Alley a few years ago.  He's right up there with Robert Mitchum and John Garfield as far as I'm concerned. 

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On 12/10/2020 at 6:57 PM, NipkowDisc said:

and therein lies great hypocrisy. the modern woman demands the right to infanticide after first facilitating pregnancy by choosing to engage in an act of recreational sex.

 

On 12/15/2020 at 12:26 PM, ElCid said:

To whom are you addressing this?

 

On 12/27/2020 at 1:30 PM, speedracer5 said:

::spoilers::

I’ve seen “Detour” four times now, and what I’ve been trying to figure out is how Vera dies. Did she strangle herself with the phone cord, or did she just happen to succumb to consumption (as we saw her coughing throughout the film) at that moment when she was wrapped up in the cord? 

 

On 12/27/2020 at 2:05 PM, speedracer5 said:

Did Al inadvertently strangle her when he pulled on the cord?

 

On 1/26/2021 at 9:09 AM, NipkowDisc said:

yesterday Biden said that the 2nd impeachment trial 'has to happen'...
sure it does because neither he or any other democrat leader has the b a ll z to stand up to that witch running the house...and besides, despite his worthless pleas for unity I think he wants the trial too. so he's a liar.
and yesterday witch pelosi proudly displayed her handywork in a portfolio just like Trump with his signatures so that tells you all you need to know.
Biden also conceded yesterday they his senate comrades will not get the votes they need to convict.
so this whole deal is a political revenge farce...especially on witch pelosi's part.
so now let there be unity.

:lol:
 

"I'm ready"

60101e88260000bd0facfae5.jpeg?cache=BpScmM9JLl&ops=1280_480

 

On 2/25/2021 at 7:57 AM, ElCid said:

As I have stated at least twice already - Eddie did NOT state why it is a film noir or why viewers should watch it as a film noir.  Others noted the same thing. 

I watch Noir Alley as much for Eddie's commentary as for the movies he picks as I have already seen most of them.  That is where I learn why he thinks it is a significant noir and why it should be viewed.

 

On 2/25/2021 at 11:57 AM, ElCid said:

You don't seem to be able to comprehend.  Maybe you should stop trying to read this on a PHONE.
Not disagreeing with your opinion, BUT AS I HAVE SAID THREE TIMES OR MORE BEFORE, EDDIE DID NOT EXPLAIN WHY IT IS A NOIR THAT PEOPLE SHOULD WATCH.  What is so hard to understand about that????????

 

16 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I must say Hudson, NY looked like a pretty dreary place, though that may have partially been the

time of night and the photography. I liked the idea of three NYC dudes going up the river to rob

a bank in some hick town. And all that detailed planning gone down the drain just because of a

raffle ticket. For shame.

If Miss Kitty had found a way to recycle all the hardly touched beers (though the rotgut whiskey was

usually finished) in the Long Branch she could have made a killing. 

 

Hudson NY, was a very interesting town, it was a whaling town  at one point, then a railroad town, and then because of the two former industries and the other factories that sprouted up,  was known for being a major party town and having one of the biggest red light districts in the Northeast. Sailors on leave from the Brooklyn Navy yard would  ride the New York Central up to Hudson. Over two hundred prostitutes worked the brothels of Diamond Street with the hookers  showing everything they got decorating  the windows, exactly like you see in the images of Amsterdam's red light district. The "dreary place" was finally closed up for good only something like eight or nine years before the film was shot, it was probably still going through it's hangover. Lol  PS. Diamond Street was a block North of Warren Street. The bank was on Warren Street and 6th Street,  the car accident that Belefonte witnesses was on Warren and 7th. The old red light district was between 6th and 7th just a block to the North. They changed the name of the street from Diamond to Columbia Street.

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Wow, I see the telephone poles and the wires too!  And I see this big thing up there that looks like some kind of power generator.  It truly is amazing how we only see what we want to, not what is right in front of us.  And there’s that woodpecker,  he’s on the telephone pole.   Finally tracked him down.

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4 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

Noir Alley has scheduled Pepe le Moko (1937) for March 27/28. Maybe this is a harbinger of more non-U.S. noir to come? Also, TCM Imports has previously screened some films in this niche.

I know very little about this film besides the fact that ever since I first read of it many many years ago, I have spontaneously and at random moments of my life burst out loud with an enthusiastic, tantric  recital of "Pepe le Moko! Pepe le Moko! Pepe le Moko!" over and over again.

It tickles me.

I want to some day hobble through the streets of Montmatre wearing only one high-heeled shoe, a cigarette dangling betwixt my lips, and repeatedly shout out "PEPE LE MOKO!!!!!!" with increasing desperation, starring in my own sort of parfum commercial.

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57 minutes ago, Cigarjoe cellph said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hudson NY, was a very interesting town, it was a whaling town  at one point, then a railroad town, and then because of the two former industries and the other factories that sprouted up,  was known for being a major party town and having one of the biggest red light districts in the Northeast. Sailors on leave from the Brooklyn Navy yard would  ride the New York Central up to Hudson. Over two hundred prostitutes worked the brothels of Diamond Street with the hookers  showing everything they got decorating  the windows, exactly like you see in the images of Amsterdam's red light district. The "dreary place" was finally closed up for good only something like eight or nine years before the film was shot, it was probably still going through it's hangover. Lol  PS. Diamond Street was a block North of Warren Street. The bank was on Warren Street and 6th Street,  the car accident that Belefonte witnesses was on Warren and 7th. The old red light district was between 6th and 7th just a block to the North. They changed the name of the street from Diamond to Columbia Street.

Whaling town? Is it on the coast? I kept thinking it was upstate

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