Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, Thompson said:

Nobody can tell me that Jane Greer in Out of the Past doesn’t  have red ruby lips.

What Thompson ol' boy? Forget this memorable line in that flick, and when they're down in that Mexico cantina?...

 

2226-3.jpg

"Why yes, yes it is Ruby Red, Jeff. Max Factor's No.5 Ruby Red, in fact. Thanks for asking."

;)

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Dargo, holy cow you are absolutely right!!!  Yes, I forgot that dialogue, but I remember seeing the lips in that cantina. I’m going into rehab,  first I’ll reevaluate Killer’s Kiss.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course. That’s what it is. Somebody says it’s a red bandanna and then you see it as a red bandanna. They don’t let you smoke in the rehab joints so I’ve changed my mind and ain’t going.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/4/2021 at 6:49 PM, Thompson said:

It’s a fact that very few women are colorblind.  You always talk about artists in the present tense.

You're pretty sure of yourself making statements like that.

As a historian, it's part of my job to determine colors from 100 year old black & white photographs. Without color, all you discern is "shade" the balance between blacks/whites, you can only guess at possible color saturation.

Color "blindness" has many variations & degrees. Saying "very few women are colorblind" is like saying "very few women suffer from hair loss" just ridiculous.

That said, typically I watch old black & white movies using the TV's "theater mode" which gives it a softer sepia tone, easier on my eyes. Except when watching noir....the harsh photography is often deliberate & emphasizes the story.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

TiciSoo, so you’re not colorblind. Until yesterday I thought I was special. I thought I could detect colors in black and white movies because I am colorblind. Can’t drive ‘cause I can’t pass the color test. Everything I’ve read about this says males are far more likely to be effected than females, that’s all.  And sure I’m sure of myself because who else am I supposed to be sure of?  Well, that was until yesterday when I learned the bitter truth about red lips and bandannas. (effected or affected, can’t ever get it  straight)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it’s very short notice but In Cold Blood is airing in 30 minutes. Truman Capote in a cameo in Murder By Death followed by his masterpiece.  Oh boy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Produced on a shoestring budget of $75,000, Killer's Kiss (1955) was Stanley Kubrick's second feature but the first one to demonstrate his emerging style and technical virtuosity as a filmmaker. Although the plot is straight out of a pulp fiction novel - a second-rate boxer rescues a dancer from a lecherous nightclub owner with underworld connections - Kubrick cleverly exploits the film noir aspects of the material through his evocative cinematography; flophouses, cheap restaurants, penny arcades, and other now vanished remnants of the Broadway section around Times Square serve as a seedy backdrop to the story. The film is also distinguished by Kubrick's use of flashbacks, nightmare sequences shot on negative film stock, and dynamic editing techniques .............

see:  https://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/22832/killers-kiss#articles-reviews?articleId=33909

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, mr6666 said:

"Produced on a shoestring budget of $75,000, Killer's Kiss (1955)

I just re watched this again, I saw it several years ago since I am a Kubrick completist. The real NYC locations are fascinating to see and while it drags a bit in the middle the final mannequin factory fight scene is worth waiting for. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw Killer's Kiss many years ago.  Eddie's background on it and reason for choosing it was informative.

The movie was mediocre, but I guess a good start for someone who would become very successful.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, ElCid said:

I saw Killer's Kiss many years ago.  Eddie's background on it and reason for choosing it was informative.

The movie was mediocre, but I guess a good start for someone who would become very successful.

I agree. I guess it's historically significant since Kubrick would ultimately become a famous director.  However, it wasn't that entertaining for me. I actually dosed off and missed the murder scene.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Kubrick made the film for $75 and sold it for $100.  What about royalties?  He didn’t walk away with just $25 did he?  The mannequin factory fight scene like Det Jim said was stunning. Gloria wore nail polish, I noticed that, but as to the color I couldn’t say.  Interesting too about filming it without sound and the time Kubrick took to add it later.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was glad to see Killer's Kiss. Obviously Kubrick already had a very firm grasp of the visual elements of film, although he hadn't figured out how to keep a suspenseful story going. The fight in the mannequin factory was worth waiting for. Jamey Smith as the boxer looks like a young Burt Lancaster, and Irene Kane has the same quality as Dolores Dorn, who turns up in several Samuel Fuller films.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Samuel Fuller.  I don’t think there’s a better photo ever taken than the one on Wikipedia.  Kubrick’s next film The Killing is an interesting meet between noir film and noir fiction.  Jim Thompson did the dialogue, a master of dialogue in his crime novels — you’ve got Thompson, David Goodis, Patricia Highsmith.  They are masters of dialogue in their novels. But, if I have one complaint about The Killing it’s the dialogue.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, kingrat said:

I was glad to see Killer's Kiss. Obviously Kubrick already had a very firm grasp of the visual elements of film, although he hadn't figured out how to keep a suspenseful story going. The fight in the mannequin factory was worth waiting for. Jamey Smith as the boxer looks like a young Burt Lancaster, and Irene Kane has the same quality as Dolores Dorn, who turns up in several Samuel Fuller films.

Actually kingrat, I was thinkin' Jamey Smith reminded me of Tony Franciosa. And, while I thought the willowy Irene Kane was sexy as hell, you probably don't want to know who SHE reminded me of...looks-wise anyway.

(...okay, I'll tell ya...believe it or not, I think she looked a lot like a young..wait for it..Richard Widmark...especially around the nose and mouth...told ya you didn't wanna know, didn't I?!)

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Thompson said:

Kubrick made the film for $75 and sold it for $100.  What about royalties?  He didn’t walk away with just $25 did he?  The mannequin factory fight scene like Det Jim said was stunning. Gloria wore nail polish, I noticed that, but as to the color I couldn’t say.  Interesting too about filming it without sound and the time Kubrick took to add it later.

Yep, and regarding the sound in this movie, I was kind'a surprised that the overdubbing of the sound was as good as it was.

(...in fact, I thought it better sounding and more in synch with the actors' mouth movements than the dubbing job Orson Welles did on his Touch of Evil, and which I've always thought was distracting as hell)

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Actually Thompson, I was thinkin' Jamey Smith reminded me of Tony Franciosa. And, while I thought the willowy Irene Kane was sexy as hell, you probably don't want to know who SHE reminded me of...looks-wise anyway.

(...okay, I'll tell ya...believe it or not, I think she looked a lot like a young..wait for it..Richard Widmark...especially around the nose and mouth...told ya you didn't wanna know, didn't I?!)

I hadn't thought of that, but she would be effectively cast as Widmark's sister, wouldn't she?

And yes, the overdubbing seemed much better than Orson Welles did on many of his later films.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Thompson said:

Samuel Fuller.  I don’t think there’s a better photo ever taken than the one on Wikipedia.  Kubrick’s next film The Killing is an interesting meet between noir film and noir fiction.  Jim Thompson did the dialogue, a master of dialogue in his crime novels — you’ve got Thompson, David Goodis, Patricia Highsmith.  They are masters of dialogue in their novels. But, if I have one complaint about The Killing it’s the dialogue.

Question here, Thompson. Do you possibly think the problem you have with The Killing's dialogue might be a bit heightened  by what I've always felt was the rather stilted and somewhat unnatural sounding way Sterling Hayden would deliver his lines in movies? 

(...yep, I've always thought his line deliveries and his voice in general was in this manner, and also rather monotoned and with a weird cadence...BUT, which DID make him perfectly cast as the crazed Gen. Ripper in another of Kubrick's movies...you know, the one where he starts spouting about "precious bodily fluids")

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point, Dargo, but no.  Sterling  Hayden is  one of a kind, he lives by no man’s code.  He is perfect as Ripper just because of that.  I love The Killing. and the small problem I have with the dialogue is with some of the side characters, especially the scene in the bar before the heist with the crooked cop.  Kubrick and Thompson had a falling out during  Paths of Glory, but it might have been with Kirk Douglas.  At any rate my thinking is dialogue is key, and great dialogue in novels doesn’t necessarily transfer to great dialogue in film. But I still believe dialogue is key.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

And that’s what really bugs me about women crime writers and that fool from the south James Lee Burke, the worst crime writer ever next to James Ellroy because he CAN’T WRITE DIALOGUE . 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now Patty Baby Highsmith can write most anything.  Although Strangers On A Train is weak and  The Price of Salt is terrible.  David Goodis never wrote one bad sentence that I’m aware of, same with that boy Charles Wllleford, but that’s beside the point.  Raymond Chandler translates into some pretty good films but he is a second rate writer along with that other guy Ross MacDonald.  I guess what I’m trying to say is if I like it then it’s good, if I don’t then probably TiciSoo will have something to say about it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

After four years I am starting to wonder when Noir Alley might have to end. While I hope it's not anytime soon, I am curious as how many more years it has left.  Although I was a little late finding this wonderful bit of programming. my best guestimate is Eddie has shown close to two hundred movies from the genre.  Maybe it's just me, but it seems like most of the popular movies that fall into the category have been shown.  Of late the films he is presenting now are either very obscure or it's a reach to even classify them as noir.  I know from reading here that there are probably many more  great films that TCM cannot show due to licensing restrictions.  Also, the fact that as many of you have pointed out, there have been some repeats recently. All this makes me worry that I'll have to go back to watching  the Sunday morning news shows at some point (UGH!) Anyway, I'm curious as to what you all might think.  Please put my mind at ease that Noir Alley will continue to keep me entertained for a few more years. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Studios made plenty of B movies, so I'm sure there's a good supply left. But does TCM have access to them?. Hope it can keep running for a few more years. Eddie does seem to have some clout about what he can pick, so hopefully that will continue.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Thompson said:

And that’s what really bugs me about women crime writers and that fool from the south James Lee Burke, the worst crime writer ever next to James Ellroy because he CAN’T WRITE DIALOGUE . 

I read all of Burke's first novels and enjoyed them, but then I am from the South with close ties to Louisiana.  However, I quit about 10 years ago because they were simply too darn long.  In addition, he started to philosophize way too much.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I loved Killer's Kiss and am happy that Eddie showed this. I love Stanley Kubrick's movies so I was curious to see what this early low-budget film would be like. I ended up being enthralled with the movie. The visuals were stunning. Seeing those New York streets at night and Kubrick's beautiful compositions made for some outstanding atmosphere. Sure, the story is some vignettes sewn together, but I found this more enjoyable than a lot of the B noirs I've watched. Kubrick's photography background definitely served him well and this movie is a prime example of what can be done with a low-budget and on location. The mannequin factory near the end was awesome. What a cool idea.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Dargo said:

Actually kingrat, I was thinkin' Jamey Smith reminded me of Tony Franciosa. And, while I thought the willowy Irene Kane was sexy as hell, you probably don't want to know who SHE reminded me of...looks-wise anyway.

(...okay, I'll tell ya...believe it or not, I think she looked a lot like a young..wait for it..Richard Widmark...especially around the nose and mouth...told ya you didn't wanna know, didn't I?!)

They do have similar lips......

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...