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Hell is not fire and brimstone, it is a relentless winter bitter northwest wind that no matter which way you turn, it blows against you.

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I just wanted to say about Killer's Kiss: Give it a try once with the sound OFF. The movie is so visually striking. Who needs the dialogue in this? The movie is not great overall, but the look is just endlessly striking. There are an endless number of shots that seem ready made to hang on the wall and stare at it. 

 

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Watched The Night Holds Terror and thought it a fairly good movie.  Eddie Muller's intro and outros were good as well and very informative.

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On 3/11/2021 at 1:40 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Two shots from the TIMES SQUARE MONTAGE in KILLER'S KISS are still fresh in my mind- both of DRUGSTORE WINDOWS [or possibly an AUTOMAT in the case of the latter]- one is of a wind-up toy swimmer swimming in a plastic bin filled with water; the other is three revolving tiers of ICE CREAM SUNDAES, which I had to assume were rubber and plaster mock-ups, but DAMN they looked good.

(

The toy swimmer was in the Playland Arcade Window, they also had a bird that would continually dip it's bill into a glass of water, and those lightbulbs with the black and white panels that would spin in the sunlight.

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The Night Holds Terror — Stone most certainly used legitimate professional telephone switchboard operators. Worth the  price of admission.  The gunplay was phony, didn’t work.  Police procedural with the TV was cool.  Once again drinks ordered at the bar were barely touched.  Even Victor left a half bottle of Coca Cola in the gas station, no reason for that.  Glad I watched it though, all these telephone poles and wires have now combined with the faces of the telephone switchboard operators.

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THE NIGHT HOLDS TERROR was entertaining. It was interesting to see Jack Kelly, Vince Edwards and John Cassavetes very early in their careers.  It was similar to THE DESPARATE HOURS which was released the same year (1955). I'm not sure it falls within my rather narrow definition of film noir, but I enjoyed it.  

I see Eddie is re-showing THE THIRD MAN next week. I'll probably watch it again even though I'm not a fan of the music. 

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It was well made, but I got bored with it about half way through. Seen too many of these hostage movies. I was more interested in that wood paneled house! Very large house for a one story. I thought the film would've been better if Edwards and Cassavettes had switched roles. Edwards was more menacing and beefier and would've been more believable as the head honcho.

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28 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

I see Eddie is re-showing THE THIRD MAN next week. I'll probably watch it again even though I'm not a fan of the music. 

You are to be envied. The Third Man, one of the great entertainments of the movies in my opinion, never makes it onto the Canadian TCM schedule. Next week we get Jack of Diamonds with George Hamilton while you get to see Holly Martins and Harry Lime in those dark crooked Viennese streets.

I haven't seen the Hamilton film and for all I know it's good. But the Carol Reed masterpiece is just that. Fortunately I have the film on DVD so can program it for myself anytime. It's a film that holds up marvelously well on repeat viewings because it has so much to offer, suspense, dry humour, brilliant direction and performances. And, of course, that magnificent brooding photography of those crooked cobblestone streets. I can't think of a noir film (even if this one is classified as "light" entertainment) that I like more than this one.

the-third-man-1.jpg

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

It was well made, but I got bored with it about half way through. Seen too many of these hostage movies. I was more interested in that wood paneled house! Very large house for a one story. I thought the film would've been better if Edwards and Cassavettes had switched roles. Edwards was more menacing and beefier and would've been more believable as the head honcho.

The middle was kind of boring, but seemed to pick up after that.  Probably right about Cassvetettes and Edwards.  Never have much cared for Edwards though.

The neighborhood where they filmed the family home reminded me of the one in Bachelor in Paradise, the Bob Hope comedy.  Not the same one, but some similarities.

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Okay flick as far as hostage movies go. Most of them with a trio of criminals usually have one "brains" of

the group, who usually isn't all that smart, one semi-psycho, who likes to tease the hostages with threats

and whatever weapon he has on hand, and one young newbie who doesn't like the thought of hurting people

and tries to comfort them. The "brains" guy isn't usually the psycho guy and vice versa. Sort of a paper, rock,

scissors thing going on. And one can usually count on hubby to show how macho he is by making at least

one futile attempt to overpower the criminals. Wasn't The Desperate Hours set in the second Leave It to Beaver

house? I liked that home better than the one in The Night Holds Terror, though the latter is kind of cute in

real estate terms. 

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

You are to be envied. The Third Man, one of the great entertainments of the movies in my opinion, never makes it onto the Canadian TCM schedule. Next week we get Jack of Diamonds with George Hamilton while you get to see Holly Martins and Harry Lime in those dark crooked Viennese streets.

I haven't seen the Hamilton film and for all I know it's good. But the Carol Reed masterpiece is just that. Fortunately I have the film on DVD so can program it for myself anytime. It's a film that holds up marvelously well on repeat viewings because it has so much to offer, suspense, dry humour, brilliant direction and performances. And, of course, that magnificent brooding photography of those crooked cobblestone streets. I can't think of a noir film (even if this one is classified as "light" entertainment) that I like more than this one.

the-third-man-1.jpg

Definitely not a fair trade!

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6 hours ago, TomJH said:

You are to be envied. The Third Man, one of the great entertainments of the movies in my opinion, never makes it onto the Canadian TCM schedule. Next week we get Jack of Diamonds with George Hamilton while you get to see Holly Martins and Harry Lime in those dark crooked Viennese streets.

I haven't seen the Hamilton film and for all I know it's good. But the Carol Reed masterpiece is just that. Fortunately I have the film on DVD so can program it for myself anytime. It's a film that holds up marvelously well on repeat viewings because it has so much to offer, suspense, dry humour, brilliant direction and performances. And, of course, that magnificent brooding photography of those crooked cobblestone streets. I can't think of a noir film (even if this one is classified as "light" entertainment) that I like more than this one.

the-third-man-1.jpg

Interesting.

After investigating this Jack of Diamonds movie which I too have never seen nor even heard of, I found it costars Joseph Cotten. And so, I wonder if that was the reason for it being the replacement pick that you guys got saddled with up there instead, Tom?

(...btw, yes, it's always hard to top the Carol Reed movie, as there's not a flaw in it...well, except of course if you happen to distain zither music like our golfing fan friend Hoganman apparently does)  ;) 

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45 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Interesting.

After investigating this Jack of Diamonds movie which I too have never seen nor even heard of, I found it costars Joseph Cotten. And so, I wonder if that was the reason for it being the replacement pick that you guys got saddled with up there instead, Tom?

(...btw, yes, it's always hard to top the Carol Reed movie, as there's not a flaw in it...well, except of course if you happen to distain zither music like our golfing fan friend Hoganman apparently does)  ;) 

About that zither music, and my apologies to those who have read this before from me.

I know that zither music can be a bit of a turnoff for some viewers, such as Hoganman. But I look at it this way, Holly Martins is a naive American in a dark foreign land far from American soil. That zither music, unusual to say the least, has a foreign sound to American ears and, thus, serves as a constant reminder that Martins is a fish out of water in a foreign land where a man can suddenly turn up very dead.

The zither music, not unlike a more conventional musical score, is also used to underline certain actions or statements in the film, almost like a cynical commentator. Nah, Dargo, I'm with you. To me The Third Man is a great film that has no flaws.

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9 minutes ago, TomJH said:

About that zither music, and my apologies to those who have read this before from me.

I know that zither music can be a bit of a turnoff for some viewers, such as Hoganman. But I look at it this way, Holly Martins is a naive American in a dark foreign land far from American soil. That zither music, unusual to say the least, has a foreign sound to American ears and, thus, serves as a constant reminder that Martins is a fish out of water in a foreign land where a man can suddenly turn up very dead.

The zither music, not unlike a more conventional musical score, is also used to underline certain actions or statements in the film, almost like an cynical commentator. Nah, Dargo, I'm with you. To me The Third Man is a great film that has no flaws.

Yep Tom, I remember your post from years back where you "defend" the use of the Zither musical score in TTM by the above argument, and it's as insightful an argument now as it was then. Absolutely.

(...and HEY, and now that's TWO times within the last few minutes where you've shown what an insightful man you are, isn't it)  ;)  LOL

 

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19 minutes ago, TomJH said:

About that zither music, and my apologies to those who have read this before from me.

I know that zither music can be a bit of a turnoff for some viewers, such as Hoganman. But I look at it this way, Holly Martins is a naive American in a dark foreign land far from American soil. That zither music, unusual to say the least, has a foreign sound to American ears and, thus, serves as a constant reminder that Martins is a fish out of water in a foreign land where a man can suddenly turn up very dead.

The zither music, not unlike a more conventional musical score, is also used to underline certain actions or statements in the film, almost like a cynical commentator. Nah, Dargo, I'm with you. To me The Third Man is a great film that has no flaws.

My parents had a recording of the Third Man Theme, so I knew the music long before I had seen the movie. For me the music adds a pleasant memory to the multiple pleasures of the film itself.

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8 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yep Tom, I remember your post from years back where you "defend" the use of the Zither musical score in TTM by the above argument, and it's as insightful an argument now as it was then. Absolutely.

(...and HEY, and now that's TWO times within the last few minutes where you've shown what an insightful man you are, isn't it)  ;)  LOL

 

It took me a while before I came up with that "insight." I always liked The Third Man and accepted the zither music (which was a big hit with the film's release) while I read of others who were irked by the zither only soundtrack. It was director Carol Reed who discovered Anton Karas playing that instrument while shooting the film in Vienna and decided it would add an unusual touch to his film rather than a conventional musical score. I guess not everyone is happy with his decision but I think the zither works.

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49 minutes ago, TomJH said:

It took me a while before I came up with that "insight." I always liked The Third Man and accepted the zither music (which was a big hit with the film's release) while I read of others who were irked by the zither only soundtrack. It was director Carol Reed who discovered Anton Karas playing that instrument while shooting the film in Vienna and decided it would add an unusual touch to his film rather than a conventional musical score. I guess not everyone is happy with his decision but I think the zither works.

I do have to admit that the first few times I watched this film on TV as a teenager, the zither music did kind of "distract" me at that time from total enjoyment of it, but then I remember catching in again in my thirties, and then coming to the realization that, and like you make note of, the musical score seems perfect for placing the film in an exact time and an exact place.

(...btw, the first time I watched it was with my parents, and who both loved all aspects of this great film...I remember them telling me that they thought it one of the greatest films ever made, and them pointing out Orson Welles to me when he has his first appearence in it, and then them relaying to me how during their generation he was considered a genius filmmaker in his own right)

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10 hours ago, Dargo said:

I do have to admit that the first few times I watched this film on TV as a teenager, the zither music did kind of "distract" me at that time from total enjoyment of it, but then I remember catching in again in my thirties, and then coming to the realization that, and like you make note of, the musical score seems perfect for placing the film in an exact time and an exact place.

(...btw, the first time I watched it was with my parents, and who both loved all aspects of this great film...I remember them telling me that they thought it one of the greatest films ever made, and them pointing out Orson Welles to me when he has his first appearence in it, and then them relaying to me how during their generation he was considered a genius filmmaker in his own right)

Poor Joseph Cotten. He's really wonderful as Holly Martins, a likable, slightly kluzy protagonist, naive in the ways of a dark underground world of which he knows nothing. Cotten brings a good heart to his role and he is very much an everyman type (good looking but not handsome) with whom audiences can identify. And when you consider the smooth characters that this actor had previously played in films like Shadow of a Doubt and Since You Went Away you appreciate his skill here in playing a bit of a stumbebum.

But few (or relatively few) people refer to his performance, great as it is, because of the magnificence of Orson Welles's film stealing portrayal of Harry Lime. Magnetic, charming, sly, corrupt and completely cold blooded. Lime is the good friend who disappeared and, over the years, changed, changed for the worse, and Welles is brilliant is this small role. That subtle facial gesture of Lime at the end, trapped, the police closing in, giving that subtle eye gesture to Holly to use the gun, great stuff.

I really love The Third Man.

8dd88b1edf15e8e20c240c06090b5906.png

Balloon Guy, by the way, was an unbilled local that Carol Reed came across while shooting the film in Vienna. To the best of my knowledge no one knows the name of this extra who delivers a couple of words of dialogue in broken English.

"Ballooooooooon" anybody?

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I love the score and the zither. It adds so much to the film. So much so, I just can't picture the film without it.

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for those interested, ORSON WELLES reprised his character from THE THIRD MAN for a one-season British radio programme titled THE LIVES OF HARRY LIME, they are  a series of blackly comic misadventures of HARRY LIME before he met his end in the VIENNESE SEWERS (a prequel of sorts.)

I really like the whole series a lot, here is one episode, but they are all available online

 

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The Lady from Shanghai irks me to no end.  That phony accent by Welles, the stunted acting, the convoluted plot, Welles with his swimsuit on.  However, I’m willing to “suspend my disbelief” with Third Man because Welles didn’t direct it.

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19 hours ago, Dargo said:

Interesting.

After investigating this Jack of Diamonds movie which I too have never seen nor even heard of, I found it costars Joseph Cotten. And so, I wonder if that was the reason for it being the replacement pick that you guys got saddled with up there instead, Tom?

(...btw, yes, it's always hard to top the Carol Reed movie, as there's not a flaw in it...well, except of course if you happen to distain zither music like our golfing fan friend Hoganman apparently does)  ;) 

Maybe I'm in the minority. I like the zither music. I think it adds a wonderful ambiance to the film.  The Third Man was the last film I saw in the theater before COVID hit. 

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Maybe I'm in the minority. I like the zither music. I think it adds a wonderful ambiance to the film.  The Third Man was the last film I saw in the theater before COVID hit. 

Well on the contrary, Speedracer. Apparently, I'm in the minority . 

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On 3/15/2021 at 11:33 PM, Dargo said:

I do have to admit that the first few times I watched this film on TV as a teenager, the zither music did kind of "distract" me at that time from total enjoyment of it,

That's me too, although I was in my 30's. While I love zither music, I do feel the soundtrack in this film was a bit high in volume, distracting me- I need to concentrate when watching a movie! That's why a movie like this works best for me, viewed on a big screen in a theater. Looks like it's time to give this one another go.

Last night I watched A KISS BEFORE DYING '56 and just hated it. It was very well done, very well acted for the most part. Robert Wagner reminded me of Warren Beatty and later Tom Cruise, just smarmy too good looking to be "nice guys". I love Joanne Woodward and hated to see her taken by a scumbag. Wagner's charactor even treated his sweet Mom -deftly played by Mary Astor- just terribly, you couldn't help hating him. The only stinker was George Macready as Woodward's rich father, he acted as if on drugs. Weird.

SPOILER

The two best scenes were people getting knocked from heights falling to their death: Woodward was an hilarious dummy (she left her cool purse on the ledge!) & Wagner's push off a cliff by a truck brought applause & laughter similarly to my reaction of THE BAD SEED. So I guess it was entertaining while being repulsive.

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