Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

I keep thinking about Robert Ryan.  He is a tough customer.  I would want him on my side in a street fight.  Orson Welles is kinda pansy like, intellectual, probably will run away when the fight starts and give some elaborate excuse later on.

Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Thompson said:

I keep thinking about Robert Ryan.  He is a tough customer.  I would want him on my side in a street fight.  Orson Welles is kinda pansy like, intellectual, probably will run away when the fight starts and give some elaborate excuse later on.

Uh,   they are actors.       

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Thompson said:

I keep thinking about Robert Ryan.  He is a tough customer.  I would want him on my side in a street fight.  Orson Welles is kinda pansy like, intellectual, probably will run away when the fight starts and give some elaborate excuse later on.

I wouldn't be so fast in that assumption about Orson Welles. Errol Flynn wrote an anecdote of an encounter he had with Welles in a Hollywood night spot. Big Boy Williams, a Flynn pal who hated Welles for some reason, was goading the actor in public that night and Welles finally said to him that perhaps they should take it outside. Williams guffawed at the suggestion but Flynn talked Big Boy out of it. Flynn said Big Boy Williams was one of the strongest men he ever met and Welles had all the guts in the world to be ready to physically stand up to him.

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Robert Ryan in real life was a proud, hard-core Libtard (And a man after my own heart) Fiercely antiwar and a sponsor of the ACLU, he actually found himself in the crosshairs of a lot of right wing militia groups. (This is actually according to Eddie Mueller himself in his book DARK CITY.) I like Robert Ryan. 
 

As far as Orson goes, it depends on which stage of his career you want to get in a fight with him. If it’s post “touch of evil” morbidly obese, constantly drunk, wine commercial filming, cravat wearing Orson- Something tells me it would be like punching a 400 pound contractor bag full of custard. 

All Orson had to do to best you was probably throw up or just collapse on top of you and wait for you to smother to death.

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Also good luck explaining to Orson that there’s no such thing as “California champagne.“ If it’s not from the Champagne region of France, then it’s merely sparkling wine.

(Of course, at this stage in the game, Orson would probably be just as happy to drink that blue stuff that the barber puts the combs in...)

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Thompson said:

I keep thinking about Robert Ryan.  He is a tough customer.  I would want him on my side in a street fight.  Orson Welles is kinda pansy like, intellectual, probably will run away when the fight starts and give some elaborate excuse later on.

Robert Ryan was a boxing champion in College  and won a championship title while he was in the Marines,It helped him a lot while filming Golden Gloves , his first major film.Nobody was buggIng Robert Ryan but he was a peaceful quiet man a real champ...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, nakano said:

Robert Ryan was a boxing champion in College  and won a championship title while he was in the Marines,It helped him a lot while filming Golden Gloves , his first major film.Nobody was buggIng Robert Ryan but he was a peaceful quiet man a real champ...

So true.   But according to Ernest Borgnine,  Spencer Tracy bugged Robert Ryan when they made Bad Day at Black Rock together.    Of course Ernest was mostly cracking wise when he made those comments about how one-armed Tracy dominated the film over Ryan,  the heavy of the film.    Below is the scene Ernest discussed.

Oh,  and there are few films with a finer cast of actors in both staring and supporting roles:  Tracy, Ryan,  Dean Jagger,  Walter Brennan,  Lee Marvin,  and Borgnine.    

http://www.thefilmyap.com/wp-content/uploads/Bad-Day-at-Black-Rock-inside.jpg

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

So true.   But according to Ernest Borgnine,  Spencer Tracy bugged Robert Ryan when they made Bad Day at Black Rock together.    Of course Ernest was mostly cracking wise when he made those comments about how one-armed Tracy dominated the film over Ryan,  the heavy of the film.    Below is the scene Ernest discussed.

Oh,  and there are few films with a finer cast of actors in both staring and supporting roles:  Tracy, Ryan,  Dean Jagger,  Walter Brennan,  Lee Marvin,  and Borgnine.    

http://www.thefilmyap.com/wp-content/uploads/Bad-Day-at-Black-Rock-inside.jpg

 

 

Something went wrong JJ - it doesn’t load the scene.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Thompson said:

Something went wrong JJ - it doesn’t load the scene.

Thanks.  I suspected that since when I see the "preview" it shows the actual photo,  but after I submit it,  it only shows the link.

If one right-clicks on the link,  it will take one to options that will display the photo.   It is the scene where Tracy is sitting down and Ryan is standing over him.

Tracy had just returned from the scene-of-the-crime and was mentioning to Ryan how daisies grow over gravesites.   Something Tracy had observed in Europe during WWII. 

What was funny about Borgnine comments about this scene is that one would think that any actor as tall as Ryan,  that is standing, while the other actor is sitting on the ground, that the standing actor would dominate the scene.     Nope,  not here given Tracy's screen presence.      So even with the that set-up of Ryan standing \ Tracy sitting,   Tracy still dominates.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Reposted because I NEVER GET TIRED OF WATCHING THIS:

”aAAAAAaah, a French cham-pagnes, always celebrated forest ellleganssse..”

 

Yeah, Orson Welles is okay, I take it all back. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Wally Cox could knock down Welles or Ryan with one hand tied behind his back. POW ZOOM.

Uh-huh! Why do you think he was picked to be the voice of Underdog!

(...it wasn't by sheer coincidence, ya know)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yes,  Robert Ryan,  an iconic noir actor. 

Robert Ryan is not a Noir Alley feature.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I believe The Third Man is longer than 90 minutes.  I will forgive that transgression and prepare myself for the extra 15 minutes.  Want to be on top of my game for this one.  Hoping for a cloudy day tomorrow morning, the doggone sun is a nuisance.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Thompson said:

Well, I believe The Third Man is longer than 90 minutes.  I will forgive that transgression and prepare myself for the extra 15 minutes.  Want to be on top of my game for this one.  Hoping for a cloudy day tomorrow morning, the doggone sun is a nuisance.  

TCM should be showing  the original British release that runs 108 minutes.  This from Wiki:

As the original British release begins, the voice of director Carol Reed (uncredited) describes post-war Vienna from a racketeer's point of view. The version shown in American cinemas cut 11 minutes of footage[36] and replaced Reed's voice-over with narration by Joseph Cotten as Holly Martins. David O. Selznick instituted the replacement because he did not think American audiences would relate to the seedy tone of the original.[37] Today, Reed's original version appears on American DVDs, in showings on Turner Classic Movies, and in US cinema releases, with the eleven minutes of footage restored, including a shot of a near topless dancer in a bar that would have violated the U.S. Code in 1948.

 

 

  • Thanks 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a comparison of THE THIRD MAN to CASABLANCA, comparing the cynicism of Harry Lime to that of Rick except in Lime's case any idealism that may once have existed under the surface had been replaced by greed and corruption. Lime is the charming out for himself loner that Rick claims to be but, in the final analysis, isn't. There was still idealism during the war when sides were pitted against one another. After the war, though, a moral rot began to set in with many, giving even greater demand for the film noir characters that we had seen in the movies during the war and even before it. Harry Lime is such a creature.

Shelden-on-Third-Man-LEAD1.jpg

Casablanca is a completely studio made production while the streets that we see in The Third Man are the real thing (though this film, too, has its share of studio sets, many done at Shepperton Studios, possibly even the sewer scenes,  since Welles complained about filming in the real ones in Vienna).

One thing these two films have in common, in my opinion, is they that are two of the most clever, thoroughly enjoyable "light entertainments" the movies have ever given us, not just from the 1940s, but ever.

 

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Dargo said:

Uh-huh! Why do you think he was picked to be the voice of Underdog!

(...it wasn't by sheer coincidence, ya know)

Yep. Then there was the time that Wally beat the crap out of his buddy Marlon Brando in a

diner in south central North Dakota over who would pick up the check. This guy was fierce.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

You mean Mr. Peepers?

The same.

Guys will get kicked *****

By men who wear glasses.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I'm ready to view THE THIRD MAN, zither music and all. I did some research and learned Joni Mitchell plays the zither. If it's good enough for Joni I can learn to like it.  

da73fd0a2dc5517d3ddea972015b2893--music-festival-style-music-festivals.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...