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“How do you know Dargo?” , I wondered out loud to the x-Ray technician who drinks long necks and half shots of Jameson.  “Most of us girls know Dargo,” she said.  “Well, if you’re so smart tell me what unrequited love means then,” I said.  “It means,” she said, “I can leave my hat on.”

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On 3/25/2021 at 11:40 AM, Thompson said:

I kinda scooted the bar stool a little to the left and caught her attention.  I said, “Look, my friend Dargo is older this year and still likes that movie The Third Man, what do you think?”  “I’ve heard of Dargo,” she said, “I like a good film noir myself but I hate to have to read anything into anything.”  “That’s what I said  to Dargo,” I told her.  

LOL

Sounds like a match made in heaven here, Thompson ol' boy!  ;)

So, when's your first date, and where are ya takin' her?

Wait, lemme guess here. To some movie where one doesn't have to "read anything into it", RIGHT?!

(...or in other words, almost any movie made TODAY!)

LOL

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Well, as we get a new entry this evening, before finally leaving The Third Man Behind, I just wanted to relay another of the reasons i love the film so much.

Callahan: " We should've dug deeper than a grave".

This line, one of my favorites ever, does a great job of summarizing the whole ambiguity going on in the exhumation of the character of Harry Lime. He's hardly in the movie. He's off screen for an overwhelming majority of the film. He's talked about, pondered, and much of the story is the examination of Holly's friendship with Lime, and Anna's love for him. As the story goes on you ask yourself, "how could she have loved this man?". And it's the same with Holly's friendship with him. Seeing how both characters deal with what they learn from Calloway about Lime is a never ending source of intrigue to me. 

That's why for me, the sudden appearance of Lime in that doorway, a sort of magic trick is how i always consider it (think of the way he disappears from Holly in that scene; he never should've been able to get away without being seen. It's an illusion of some kind, with the creepy shadows in the alley way and the echo of running footsteps) is one of my favorite scenes in any movie ever. The sudden appearance of Lime in the lighted doorway reinforces the idea of the power Lime has in both life AND death; we need to look closer at who Lime was, what he meant to the characters, and what his actions mean in a world blasted by human deprivation. Lime seems to hold a power over everyone in the film, even after his death, he goes on holding sway over the character's lives ( Callaway and Martens' obsessions with him; Anna's love). And you see at the end he will continue to hold sway even after his "second" death. It's an amazing effect of the structure of the storytelling in this film. It's not out of sequence; but still, the bringing back to life plot device in this case adds real depth to the story being told.

The film begins with Lime's "funeral". Much later, he's resurrected; "dug up" at that same cemetery. He's figuratively and literally brought back, temporarily any way, to life. And the film ends at Lime's real funeral, after an extended sequence underground, in the sewers of Vienna, where Holly ends his life. We see Anna's ultimate response to Holly's actions in the stunning final shot of the film. Even after having seen the picture untold times, I'm not positive what to make of it. Especially when trying unravel the personal stories within the context of a war ravaged Vienna, whose culture has been completely obliterated by the war, the city leveled to the ground, its citizens robbed of any kind of level headed human morality.

Like Eddie said in his closing remarks, there's a lot to take in there. And it's something I've remained intrigued about in my lifetime of movie going. And my thoughts have continued to shift over time as I think of it. And it remains intriguing after all these years.

For me, it's one of my greatest movie experiences. An incredible story, told best as a film. Read the novella; it's very good. The movie's that much better.

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15 hours ago, Dargo said:

LOL

Sounds like a match made in heaven here, Thompson ol' boy!  ;)

So, when's your first date, and where are ya takin' her?

Wait, lemme guess here. To some movie where one doesn't have to "read anything into it", RIGHT?!

(...or in other words, almost any movie made TODAY!)

LOL

I’ve seen a couple of movies made TODAY, yes sir, walked out of the theater midway — The Untouchables with Kevin Costner, Rain Man with Dustin Hoffman.  I stayed the whole way through just to torture myself like Ignatius Reilly with that Scorsese film The Color of Money.  No, we’ll just go to her place tonight.  Noir Alley is on at midnight.  If things go well, we’ll watch it again Sunday morning.

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Let me be the first to say I enjoyed this movie immensely.  As did the X-Ray technician.  First viewing, and like all great motion pictures, this one will only get better with with future views.  Thank you Eddie for once again doing what you do.

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I enjoyed Pepe le Moko.  Also Eddie's commentary(s) around it.   I'm not sure I'd classify it as a "noir" per sec,  but we all know that noir is more a style than a genre, and I definitely don't want  to get into yet another debate about what exactly is defined as "noir".  I was entertained by it, amused by many of the characters,  impressed by the "Casbah" setting (most of which was probably a set, I doubt they actually went to Algiers to film it, but that's ok.)   I liked Jean Gabin...in fact, I liked all the actors in this French film.  Especially someone by the name of "Lucas Gridoux", who played the slimey but somehow likable Inspector Slimane  (appropriate name, that, given he was, as I said , somewhat slimey.) 

I've seen the remake, Algiers, which Eddie mentions.  It's very similar to the original. At the time I saw it  (a few years ago, on TCM), I was unaware of the original. I do like the original better, but the remake was also fine.

I'm afraid that, although I did quite like Pepe le Moko, I can't think of much more to say about it.   Anyone else?

 

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54 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

I enjoyed Pepe le Moko.  Also Eddie's commentary(s) around it.   I'm not sure I'd classify it as a "noir" per sec,  but we all know that noir is more a style than a genre, and I definitely don't want  to get into yet another debate about what exactly is defined as "noir".  I was entertained by it, amused by many of the characters,  impressed by the "Casbah" setting (most of which was probably a set, I doubt they actually went to Algiers to film it, but that's ok.)   I liked Jean Gabin...in fact, I liked all the actors in this French film.  Especially someone by the name of "Lucas Gridoux", who played the slimey but somehow likable Inspector Slimane  (appropriate name, that, given he was, as I said , somewhat slimey.) 

I've seen the remake, Algiers, which Eddie mentions.  It's very similar to the original. At the time I saw it  (a few years ago, on TCM), I was unaware of the original. I do like the original better, but the remake was also fine.

I'm afraid that, although I did quite like Pepe le Moko, I can't think of much more to say about it.   Anyone else?

 

I also enjoyed it quite a lot, MissW. Second viewing for me. Like you, I have no desire to go round and round the gerbil cage on whether it is or isn't noir.  And yes, wasn't Lucas Gridoux great as Inspector Slimane. This story absolutely depends on having an unusually charismatic actor in the title role--Gabin certainly qualifies--and a fascinating woman he would plausibly risk everything for--Mireille Balin definitely qualifies. Charles Boyer and Hedy Lamarr deliver in Algiers, too. Did you notice how Gabin slaps everyone around, male and female alike? We have to believe that, however we would respond to that treatment, the people who know Gabin would accept it.

Julien Duvivier continues to impress me as one of the great directors, especially impressive here for the creation of the world of the Casbah.

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2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

 I was entertained by it, amused by many of the characters,  impressed by the "Casbah" setting (most of which was probably a set, I doubt they actually went to Algiers to film it, but that's ok.) 

It looked they had a set built that got a lot of use. Wikipedia says "...only exterior shots were filmed in Algiers."  Looked to me like there was a good amount of location footage that made the cut. 

Noir Alley is by far my favorite and Eddie is the professor. Pepe le Moko was ok. The Algiers Casbah setting was intriguing and the cinematography well done. About a 4 on the 10 scale for me.

MGM channel shows a couple Noir features on Tuesday mights. Most of the time it's the same films as shown on TCM but every so often there's a new one. Woman in the Window comes to mind. I've never seen it on TCM.

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I have not seen PEPE LE MOKO yet, but I will try.

I have, however, seen ALGIERS, THE 1938 HOLLYWOOD ENGLISH LANGUAGE remake with CHARLES BOYER and, um, it's bad. Really bad. I watched it because I like CHARLES BOYER a lot, and it's not his fault the movie is bad, it's the director's.

ALGIERS was, I distinctly recall, shot in an astoundingly mundane manner- almost the entire film was comprised of mid-length, two person shots with hardly any editing or closeups or angles. I don't recall the camera moving once. it was almost as if it were a low-budget B-Picture because they obviously took NO TIME to set up shots .

it ends up being downright hard to watch.

so I am curious if PEPE LE MOKO is similarly static.

 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I have not seen PEPE LE MOKO yet, but I will try.

I have, however, seen ALGIERS, THE 1938 HOLLYWOOD ENGLISH LANGUAGE remake with CHARLES BOYER and, um, it's bad. Really bad. I watched it because I like CHARLES BOYER a lot, and it's not his fault the movie is bad, it's the director's.

ALGIERS was, I distinctly recall, shot in an astoundingly mundane manner- almost the entire film was comprised of mid-length, two person shots with hardly any editing or closeups or angles. I don't recall the camera moving once. it was almost as if it were a low-budget B-Picture because they obviously took NO TIME to set up shots .

it ends up being downright hard to watch.

so I am curious if PEPE LE MOKO is similarly static.

 

IT WAS. Very talky. And with subtitles it was hard to keep up with it. Lots of atmosphere and nice camerawork, but I got bored about halfway through. And thumbs down to Eddie for revealing the ending of ALGIERS! Not all of us have seen it! Don't understand Jean Gabin's appeal. He's a good actor, but I find him repulsive looking. Must be a French thing.

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7 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I have not seen PEPE LE MOKO yet, but I will try.

I have, however, seen ALGIERS, THE 1938 HOLLYWOOD ENGLISH LANGUAGE remake with CHARLES BOYER and, um, it's bad. Really bad. I watched it because I like CHARLES BOYER a lot, and it's not his fault the movie is bad, it's the director's.

ALGIERS was, I distinctly recall, shot in an astoundingly mundane manner- almost the entire film was comprised of mid-length, two person shots with hardly any editing or closeups or angles. I don't recall the camera moving once. it was almost as if it were a low-budget B-Picture because they obviously took NO TIME to set up shots .

it ends up being downright hard to watch.

so I am curious if PEPE LE MOKO is similarly static.

 

No, it is not static (to me) at all.  Quite the opposite.  The director does those fade outs when the scene is over then moves the action along with another scene.  Lots of street characters, all very believable and intriguing, especially the gypsy girl friend, she is terrific.  I found one scene on the phony side and not “poetic realism” — when Pepe starts singing because he’s ‘in love’ and all the women below are smiling and happy  — that should have been on the cutting floor.  But I’ll tell you what, this film is a winner.  The language of course, but it seemed to me the translator who did the subtitles knew what he was doing.  Cool slangy lingo being tossed about.  The connection between Pepe le Moko and The Third Man is hard to understand.  Well, I guess we’ll all have to wait until May to reassess Touch of Evil.  In the meantime -  oh yeah, everybody in Pepe le Moko smoked a great cigarette and drank all their drinks.  Well done.  

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I have to agree with Eduardo that Pepe was one sharp dressed man, a fashionista avant la lettre, and

a worthy Gangster's Quarterly cover model, even if beneath the cool threads he was a pretty nasty

piece of work, which no amount of puppy lovesickness and moaning could quite cover up. Very

stylish movie making with a witty script which elevated what was really just another old gangster flick.

I didn't quite buy that such a egotistical chappie like Pepe would opt for suicide even if he was looking

at the possibility of having his head separated from the rest of his body. That's just my personal take;it's

certainly debatable. Overall a pretty entertaining flic. 

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On 3/27/2021 at 2:27 PM, Thompson said:

I’ve seen a couple of movies made TODAY, yes sir, walked out of the theater midway — The Untouchables with Kevin Costner, Rain Man with Dustin Hoffman.  I stayed the whole way through just to torture myself like Ignatius Reilly with that Scorsese film The Color of Money.  No, we’ll just go to her place tonight.  Noir Alley is on at midnight.  If things go well, we’ll watch it again Sunday morning.

I take it you didn't like THE UNTOUCHABLES. Granted there were some flaws. For instance having Frank Nitti die was historically incorrect. He actually ran the crime organization while Capone was in prison. However, whether it happened or not, I thought the scene in the train station when Capone's people were trying to get the accountant out of Chicago was fantastic. My favorite part was when Ness said to Stone (while Stone was holding the baby carriage); "Ness- You got him?  Stone -Yea, I got him. Ness-take him!". I watch the movie every time it's on just for that sequence. 

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For anyone who is interested in the Pepe le Moko remake, Algiers (1938) happens to be scheduled on TCM this coming Thursday, April 1 at 4:15 pm Eastern time (both U.S. and Canada).  Algiers qualifies for 31 Days of Oscar with 4 nominations - actor Charles Boyer, supporting actor Gene Lockhart, cinematography by James Wong Howe, and art direction by Alexander Toluboff.

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For anyone that is going to go through Noir withdrawals this month with no Noir Alley here are the Noir, Transitional Noir, International Noir and Neo Noir scheduled 😎

Today - All the King's Men  1950

April 3 - Caged (1950)

April 5 - Fallen Idol (1948)

April 9 - Hangmen Also Die! (1943)

April 11 - I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932), I Want To Live! (1958) - Transitional Noirs In Cold Blood (1967) and In The Heat Of The Night (1967)

April 13 - Johnny Eager (1943) Key Largo (1948)

April 14 - La Strada - Noir Italian Style (1954), Ladies in Retirement (1941)

April 15 - The Letter (1940),  Neo Noir - Leaving Las Vegas (1995)

April 16 - The Maltese Falcon (1941)

April 17 - Mildred Pierce (1945), Transitional Noir The Manchurian Candidate (1962) 

April 18 - Mystery Street (1950)

April 19 - Brit Noir Odd Man Out (1947), Film Soleil Transitional Noir Night of the Iguana (1964)

April 22 - Possessed (1947), One of the very first Transitional Noir Psycho (1960)

April 23 - Hitchcock Noir-  Rear Window (1954)

April 25 - Hitchcock Noir - Shadow Of A Doubt (1943), Neo Noir Shaft (1971)

April 27 - The Strange Loves Of Martha Ivers (1946), The Stranger (1946), Hitchcock Noir - Strangers On A Train (1951), Southern Gothic Noir A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

April 28 - Transitional Noir Sweet Bird Of Youth (1962)

April 29 - The Third Man (1949)

 

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

For anyone that is going to go through Noir withdrawals this month with no Noir Alley here are the Noir, Transitional Noir, International Noir and Neo Noir scheduled 😎

Today - All the King's Men  1950

April 3 - Caged (1950)

April 5 - Fallen Idol (1948)

April 9 - Hangmen Also Die! (1943)

April 11 - I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932), I Want To Live! (1958) - Transitional Noirs In Cold Blood (1967) and In The Heat Of The Night (1967)

April 13 - Johnny Eager (1943) Key Largo (1948)

April 14 - La Strada - Noir Italian Style (1954), Ladies in Retirement (1941)

April 15 - The Letter (1940),  Neo Noir - Leaving Las Vegas (1995)

April 16 - The Maltese Falcon (1941)

April 17 - Mildred Pierce (1945), Transitional Noir The Manchurian Candidate (1962) 

April 18 - Mystery Street (1950)

April 19 - Brit Noir Odd Man Out (1947), Film Soleil Transitional Noir Night of the Iguana (1964)

April 22 - Possessed (1947), One of the very first Transitional Noir Psycho (1960)

April 23 - Hitchcock Noir-  Rear Window (1954)

April 25 - Hitchcock Noir - Shadow Of A Doubt (1943), Neo Noir Shaft (1971)

April 27 - The Strange Loves Of Martha Ivers (1946), The Stranger (1946), Hitchcock Noir - Strangers On A Train (1951), Southern Gothic Noir A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

April 28 - Transitional Noir Sweet Bird Of Youth (1962)

April 29 - The Third Man (1949)

 

 

 

 

Thanks.  Is Southern Gothic Noir really a category?  Other movies that fit into it?  Personally I never have thought much of A Streetcar Named Desire.

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6 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

April 27 - The Strange Loves Of Martha Ivers (1946), The Stranger (1946), Hitchcock Noir - Strangers On A Train (1951), Southern Gothic Noir A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

Thanks for posting these films.     On April 27 TCM should have shown Three Strangers,   the Lorre \ Greenstreet noir instead of Streetcar.

Oh well,   this theme was rather strange to begin with!

 

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Since many of the recent offerings have been repeats, I won't miss NA too much. 

Wise Blood~neo-Southern Gothic, Body Wounding, Weird Preachers noir.

The Wizard of Oz~Kansas Dust Storm Rouge Shoe Wear noir.

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