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6 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I watched Crack Up on MOVIES-TV last night.     This 1946 RKO noir is a very good fairly early in the cycle film that has a solid cast  (Pat O'Brien,  first rate noir dame Claire Trevor, but in a good-gal role,  and Herbert Marshall),  with   good direction by Irving Reis (director of many of the Falcon films).

Robert De Grasse was the Cinematographer and there are many nice noir visuals;   E.g. the use of shadows is excellent,  as well as the train scene and use of window reflection and an on-coming train light.     The film is a psychological crime film and De Grasse and Reis make good use of the camera to explore the inter-working's of O'Brien mind and torment.

Also staring the fine actors Ray Collins and Wallace Ford.      I can't recall if Muller has shown this on Noir Alley.    Either way,  check this film out if you haven't seen it.  

Crack-Up (1946 film) - Wikipedia

Agree, the film has some nice cinematography,  however the train wreck premise  that  the whole tale revolves around was bogus and  pretty much all baloney.   Hollywood license.

Both the director Irving Reis and one of the screenwriters  Ben Bengal  were born and raised in New York City. They knew better and apparently didn't speak up or didn't really care, and any New Yorker who commutes by train will know immediately the glaring  mistake.  The New York Central RR  from 1906, The Pennsylvania RR and Long Island RR from 1910 , and  the New Haven RR from 1907 on were all electrified.  So the train wreck that Pat O'Brien thinks he experienced and when he hears the train at the end when he's in that apartment along upper Park Ave. should not have had a steam locomotive sound, lol. All the trains coming into and out of New York City would, aside from an electrical hum and  the clickety-clack be almost silent save for a blast from an air horn.

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18 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Agree, the film has some nice cinematography,  however the train wreck premise  that  the whole tale revolves around was bogus and  pretty much all baloney.   Hollywood license.

Both the director Irving Reis and one of the screenwriters  Ben Bengal  were born and raised in New York City. They knew better and apparently didn't speak up or didn't really care, and any New Yorker who commutes by train will know immediately the glaring  mistake.  The New York Central RR  from 1906, The Pennsylvania RR and Long Island RR from 1910 , and  the New Haven RR from 1907 on were all electrified.  So the train wreck that Pat O'Brien thinks he experienced and when he hears the train at the end when he's in that apartment along upper Park Ave. should not have had a steam locomotive sound, lol. All the trains coming into and out of New York City would, aside from an electrical hum and  the clickety-clack be almost silent save for a blast from an air horn.

Interesting info.     I assume Reis and Bengal just didn't care getting the effect they wanted,  bogus or not.     But since the time period (post WWII \ 1945)   was a part of the plot  that is rather sloppy.

Note that Wallace Ford had a busy post-WWII noir period;  in 1946 and 1947 he was in 4 noirs for 4 different studios;   Black Angel (Universal),   Crack Up (RKO),  Dead Reckoning (Columbia),  and T-Men (Eagle-Lion).        Ford continued to be a feature in some fine noir films,   e.g. the last two films Garfield made,   The Breaking Point,   and He Ran All the Way.

 

 

 

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Some actors look clumsy when smoking a cigarette and I think it’s because they are smoking with the right hand instead of the left.  I’ve tested this theory, and sure enough, a right handed drinker will drink with his right hand and smoke with his left hand.

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7 minutes ago, Thompson said:

Some actors look clumsy when smoking a cigarette and I think it’s because they are smoking with the right hand instead of the left.  I’ve tested this theory, and sure enough, a right handed drinker will drink with his right hand and smoke with his left hand.

Bogart wouldn't have agreed.

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Neither would Mitchum.

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Isn’t that the mirror effect in photography?  The left and right and negatives?  No, Humphrey Bogart, unless he was left handed, would always drink his drink with his right hand.  He would therefore smoke with his left.  You don’t drink and smoke with the same hand,

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12 minutes ago, Thompson said:

Isn’t that the mirror effect in photography?  The left and right and negatives?  No, Humphrey Bogart, unless he was left handed, would always drink his drink with his right hand.  He would therefore smoke with his left.  You don’t drink and smoke with the same hand,

If a picture says a thousand words then here are about four thousand of them. Whether drinking or smoking, Bogie was a right handed guy.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

If a picture says a thousand words then here are about four thousand of them. Whether drinking or smoking, Bogie was a right handed guy.

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For what it's worth, Bogart and Mitchum, as smokers and drinkers, were expert to the point of being ambidextrous. 😉

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7 minutes ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

For what it's worth, Bogart and Mitchum, as smokers and drinkers, were expert to the point of being ambidextrous. 😉

That may be true but, based on the photos I saw, Bogart favoured his right hand. I only looked at a few pix of Mitchum.

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I apologize to the group.  I had recently watched a Columbo with Dick Van Dyke as the wife killer photographer and Columbo tricked Dick with a picture of a clock.  I got confused between the negative and the actual, or positive I guess.

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It’s fairly easy to spot an actor / actress who is not a smoker.  Bogart is the king because he can roll them just right too.  Bette Davis certainly ranks way up there.  Peter Lorre is a good smoker.

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5 hours ago, Thompson said:

It’s fairly easy to spot an actor / actress who is not a smoker.  Bogart is the king because he can roll them just right too.  Bette Davis certainly ranks way up there.  Peter Lorre is a good smoker.

Bogart and Lorre and their love of smoking became an issue with Jack Warner while John Huston was directing his first film,  The Maltese Falcon.   

There is an inordinate amount of smoking done by the main actors in this film. According to then-studio employee (and future screenwriter) Stuart Jerome, this resulted in a feud between studio head Jack L. Warner and stars Humphrey Bogart and Peter Lorre. Warner hated to see actors smoking on the screen, fearing it would prompt smokers in the movie audience to step out into the lobby for a cigarette. During filming he told director John Huston that smoking should be kept to a minimum. Bogart and Lorre thought it would be fun to annoy Warner by smoking as often as possible, and got their co-stars, Mary Astor and Sydney Greenstreet, to go along with the joke. During the initial filming of the climactic confrontation, all four actors smoked heavily. After seeing the rushes, Warner furiously called Huston to his office and threatened to fire him from the picture if he didn't tell Bogart and Lorre to knock it off. Realizing their prank had backfired, Bogart and Lorre agreed to stop smoking on camera. However, when the next series of rushes came back, it was obvious that the "lack" of smoking by the actors was taking away from the sinister mood of the scene. Huston went back to Warner and convinced him that the smoking added the right amount of atmospheric tension to the story, arguing that the characters would indeed smoke cigarettes while waiting nervously for the Maltese Falcon to arrive.

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Did Jane Greer smoke a filtered cigarette in Out of the Past?  Maybe.  Most of the serious smoking is done with non filter cigarettes.  And the reason is you smoke them differently.  Once you have to draw a bit with the filters, you get mad and tear the filter off.

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18 hours ago, Thompson said:

Katherine Hepburn was never in a film noir thank goodness.

Note true;     I guess you haven't seen Undercurrent (1946),    produced by MGM.    It stars Hepburn,   and two Roberts - Taylor and Mitchum.   

The films is only OK,  mainly because of the misguided casting of Taylor and Mitchum (if their roles were reversed it might have been much better).

 

Undercurrent-1946.jpg

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Hepburn rubs me the wrong way is all.  A lot of so called actresses rub me the wrong way. I guess I’m a misogynist.  Karen Black is okay.

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12 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Note true;     I guess you haven't seen Undercurrent (1946),    produced by MGM.    It stars Hepburn,   and two Roberts - Taylor and Mitchum.   

The films is only OK,  mainly because of the misguided casting of Taylor and Mitchum (if there roles were reversed it might have been much better).

 

Undercurrent-1946.jpg

Agree I didn't care for it either

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On 4/21/2021 at 2:57 PM, Thompson said:

Katherine Hepburn was never in a film noir thank goodness.

There's also Keeper of the Flame, with Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy, directed by George Cukor. Not the team you think of when you hear the word "noir." Better than you might fear.

As for Undercurrent, well, Mitchum called it "Underdrawers." He and Hepburn hated each other and have zero chemistry in the movie.

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Actually the Pascal quote is, whatever that term is when a writer starts his novel with a quote from somebody, the beginning of Charles Willeford’s second Hoke Moseley novel New Hope for the Dead, which has nothing to do with film noir.  However, if you like pulp fiction noir novels, you will love Charles Willeford (even though he came later and is not considered part of the genre), especially the four novel series featuring Detective  Hoke Moseley published in the 80’s and based in Miami.  “Why would I like Willeford?” You ask. Well, because I do, silly goose.  This afternoon TCM is airing Strangers on a Train.  Patricia Highsmith is probably the greatest writer in the crime noir genre, especially her Ripley novels. Strangers on a Train, her first or second novel is weak.  The Price of Salt is weak.  Everything else she wrote is untouchable.

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