Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Did anyone else watch I Love Trouble? A less than outstanding print, a plot as confusing as The Big Sleep, unremarkable direction by S. Sylvan Simon, yet quite entertaining. This is one of the best Franchot Tone performances I've seen. He makes a great cynical, world-weary, wisecracking detective, and Glenda Farrell matches him as the perfect wisecracking Gal Friday. Janet Blair, Janis Carter, and Adele Jergens show that the movie is no slouch in the good-looking dames department. I couldn't quite get how Adele Jergens fit into the plot, but I suspect that some of the guys who watched weren't complaining about that. I wish that Janis Carter had had more screen time.

John Ireland is way down in the credits, but he makes an excellent hood working for club owner Steven Geray. Raymond Burr has an even smaller role as a henchman, but as soon as he speaks, you immediately know who it is. Eduardo Ciannelli is well-cast as a mobster, and the uncredited Sid Tomack has a great part as the ex-vaudeville non-star Buster Buffin. Imagine a Milton Berle wannabe rattling off the stalest jokes you've ever heard, and that's the guy. The uncredited Mary Adams Hayes has a funny bit as a waitress called Fannie. See what I mean about it being entertaining?

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying to clean the slate for Touch of Evil.  Want to watch it like a virgin.  With a willing suspension of disbelief and no inclination to read anything into anything.  It’s hard to do.  But I’ve got several days to do it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/9/2021 at 2:08 PM, kingrat said:

Did anyone else watch I Love Trouble? A less than outstanding print, a plot as confusing as The Big Sleep, unremarkable direction by S. Sylvan Simon, yet quite entertaining. This is one of the best Franchot Tone performances I've seen. He makes a great cynical, world-weary, wisecracking detective, and Glenda Farrell matches him as the perfect wisecracking Gal Friday. Janet Blair, Janis Carter, and Adele Jergens show that the movie is no slouch in the good-looking dames department. I couldn't quite get how Adele Jergens fit into the plot, but I suspect that some of the guys who watched weren't complaining about that. I wish that Janis Carter had had more screen time.

John Ireland is way down in the credits, but he makes an excellent hood working for club owner Steven Geray. Raymond Burr has an even smaller role as a henchman, but as soon as he speaks, you immediately know who it is. Eduardo Ciannelli is well-cast as a mobster, and the uncredited Sid Tomack has a great part as the ex-vaudeville non-star Buster Buffin. Imagine a Milton Berle wannabe rattling off the stalest jokes you've ever heard, and that's the guy. The uncredited Mary Adams Hayes has a funny bit as a waitress called Fannie. See what I mean about it being entertaining?

I started to watch it but only saw the first 15 minutes or so.   I believe it was on late and I had to go to sleep (because I was enjoying what I was seeing).

I agree it was well cast with many actors that were featured in a lot of noir films, like Janis Carter, Steven Geray, and Raymond Burr.     I like what I saw so far from Tone,  but I did wonder if he could pull off such a character,  since my experience with him was mostly with light hearted type material (expect for Five Graves to Cairo).

 Hopefully TCM shows this film again.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/9/2021 at 2:08 PM, kingrat said:

Did anyone else watch I Love Trouble? A less than outstanding print, a plot as confusing as The Big Sleep, unremarkable direction by S. Sylvan Simon, yet quite entertaining. This is one of the best Franchot Tone performances I've seen. He makes a great cynical, world-weary, wisecracking detective, and Glenda Farrell matches him as the perfect wisecracking Gal Friday. Janet Blair, Janis Carter, and Adele Jergens show that the movie is no slouch in the good-looking dames department. I couldn't quite get how Adele Jergens fit into the plot, but I suspect that some of the guys who watched weren't complaining about that. I wish that Janis Carter had had more screen time.

John Ireland is way down in the credits, but he makes an excellent hood working for club owner Steven Geray. Raymond Burr has an even smaller role as a henchman, but as soon as he speaks, you immediately know who it is. Eduardo Ciannelli is well-cast as a mobster, and the uncredited Sid Tomack has a great part as the ex-vaudeville non-star Buster Buffin. Imagine a Milton Berle wannabe rattling off the stalest jokes you've ever heard, and that's the guy. The uncredited Mary Adams Hayes has a funny bit as a waitress called Fannie. See what I mean about it being entertaining?

Yes, I posted somewhere that I liked it! Terrible print. Had never seen or heard of this film before. Hope it turns up on Noir Alley. (I recorded it as it was on some Godawful time in the morning and watched it later in the wknd).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/9/2021 at 2:08 PM, kingrat said:

Did anyone else watch I Love Trouble? A less than outstanding print, a plot as confusing as The Big Sleep, unremarkable direction by S. Sylvan Simon, yet quite entertaining. This is one of the best Franchot Tone performances I've seen. He makes a great cynical, world-weary, wisecracking detective, and Glenda Farrell matches him as the perfect wisecracking Gal Friday. Janet Blair, Janis Carter, and Adele Jergens show that the movie is no slouch in the good-looking dames department. I couldn't quite get how Adele Jergens fit into the plot, but I suspect that some of the guys who watched weren't complaining about that. I wish that Janis Carter had had more screen time.

John Ireland is way down in the credits, but he makes an excellent hood working for club owner Steven Geray. Raymond Burr has an even smaller role as a henchman, but as soon as he speaks, you immediately know who it is. Eduardo Ciannelli is well-cast as a mobster, and the uncredited Sid Tomack has a great part as the ex-vaudeville non-star Buster Buffin. Imagine a Milton Berle wannabe rattling off the stalest jokes you've ever heard, and that's the guy. The uncredited Mary Adams Hayes has a funny bit as a waitress called Fannie. See what I mean about it being entertaining?

Although the plot was complicated, I didnt find it as confusing as the Big Sleep (which I still can't figure out after many viewings and I don't want to watch it anymore!). I was not totally surprised by the reveal at the end, but it kept me guessing.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Although the plot was complicated, I didnt find it as confusing as the Big Sleep (which I still can't figure out after many viewings and I don't want to watch it anymore!). I was not totally surprised by the reveal at the end, but it kept me guessing.

I've explained the plot of The Big Sleep movie at this forum.  To me it really isn't that complicated (of course this is the film I have seen the most, both the pre-release version and the final, post-war one).    What part can't you figure out?   E.g.  who killed who?

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I gave up on caring about the plot of The Big Sleep years ago. The story is the least of that film's virtues, as far as I'm concerned. In fact I find a explanation of the story and who killed who a pretty dry, boring topic.

As long it has that cast with their delivery of occasionally sparkling dialogue, its sudden bursts of stylish violence, the sexy chemistry of Marlowe's various encounters with members of the opposite sex (including a cab driver and a bookstore clerk with things on her mind other than selling books) and Max Steiner's alternately exciting and romantic musical score I'm happy with this film. That cold blooded moment in which gunman Canino offers a drink to Jonesy ("What do you think it is? Poison?") stays with you. Far and away my favourite film of Bogie and Baby

The Big Sleep Film Review | It Rains... You Get Wet

The Big Sleep (1946) - Photo Gallery - IMDb

The Big Sleep 1946

The Big Sleep - brasillasopa

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I've explained the plot of The Big Sleep movie at this forum.  To me it really isn't that complicated (of course this is the film I have seen the most, both the pre-release version and the final, post-war one).    What part can't you figure out?   E.g.  who killed who?

 

 

No, I have a hard time keeping the characters straight as they are just talked about. At this point, I don't really care anymore! LOL. Have seen it enough times over the years.

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Yes, it's pretty boring because they have Bogie explain it all in a long recap.....

....No, I have a hard time keeping the characters straight as they are just talked about. At this point, I don't really care anymore! LOL. Have seen it enough times over the years.

Sounds to me Hibi that your feelings about this Bogart movie could pretty well be summed up by paraphrasing a line of his from another film:

"It's the stuff tedium is made of."

;)

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The great Fred C Dobbs did a fantastic essay on The Big Sleep titled the Big Sleep resolved or something like that if LawrenceA  is reading this I'am sure  he can track it down and  put the link on this thread, by the way i miss you Larry...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Sounds to me Hibi that your feelings about this Bogart movie could pretty well be summed up by paraphrasing a line of his from another film:

"It's the stuff tedium is made of."

;)

LOL. There are parts I like, but overall it's not a fav. The trick I guess is not caring about who did what....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Raymond Chandler is a second rate writer, there is no question about that.  Try reading him.  Ross MacDonald is even worse.  Try reading him.  But nothing can compare to the phony acting and vocal accents and awful timing and just plain bad acting of Katharine Hepburn , ugghh..  I find it hard to believe she ever got a job in Hollywood.  Spencer Tracy I guess liked her, but he had to booze it up first and I’m sure he never took her serious as an actress.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/12/2021 at 9:41 AM, jamesjazzguitar said:

I've explained the plot of The Big Sleep movie at this forum.  To me it really isn't that complicated (of course this is the film I have seen the most, both the pre-release version and the final, post-war one).    What part can't you figure out?   E.g.  who killed who?

 

 

Didn't the director even say he couldn't follow the plot?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/12/2021 at 6:40 PM, Thompson said:

Raymond Chandler is a second rate writer, there is no question about that.  Try reading him.  Ross MacDonald is even worse.  Try reading him.  But nothing can compare to the phony acting and vocal accents and awful timing and just plain bad acting of Katharine Hepburn , ugghh..  I find it hard to believe she ever got a job in Hollywood.  Spencer Tracy I guess liked her, but he had to booze it up first and I’m sure he never took her serious as an actress.

 

I've read all of Chandler's novels, though he didn't write that many. I have no trouble calling him a first 

rate writer. Of course these are all subjective opinions so no one is right or wrong.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/12/2021 at 12:41 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

I've explained the plot of The Big Sleep movie at this forum.  To me it really isn't that complicated (of course this is the film I have seen the most, both the pre-release version and the final, post-war one).    What part can't you figure out?   E.g.  who killed who?

 

 

I have never had a problem with the plot of The Big Sleep.  

On 5/12/2021 at 7:40 PM, Thompson said:

Raymond Chandler is a second rate writer, there is no question about that.  Try reading him.  Ross MacDonald is even worse.  Try reading him.  But nothing can compare to the phony acting and vocal accents and awful timing and just plain bad acting of Katharine Hepburn , ugghh..  I find it hard to believe she ever got a job in Hollywood.  Spencer Tracy I guess liked her, but he had to booze it up first and I’m sure he never took her serious as an actress.

 

Raymond Chandler and Ross MacDonald had several books turned into successful movies.  Not sure if I have read either one, but I have read many in the genre and time period.   I am sure they are first rate writers for the genre for which they wrote.    If they were not first rate, they would not have been so successful.

Now I have to look and see if I can find some Chandler and MacDonald books to read.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Didn't the director even say he couldn't follow the plot?

I think that is sort of the same animal as  Urban Legend all it Hollywood Legend. Something may have been said in jest or sarcastically by Chandler or the director and its morphed into that statement. 

Chandler  cannibalized  "Killer in the Rain" (published in 1935) and "The Curtain" (published in 1936)., and fashioned them into The Big Sleep with small sections of  "Finger Man" and "Mandarin's Jade" thrown in as garnish.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Except for The Long Goodbye Chandler's novels are relatively short, in the 200 to 240 page range,

so there's no problem for folks who don't like doorstop books.

 

I recall reading the story that someone working on The Big Sleep couldn't understand part of

the plot and wrote Chandler about it and he couldn't understand it either. Probably just

another Hollywood story. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/6/2021 at 8:01 PM, Dargo said:

I'm sure you know the old line about this sort'a thing that's been attributed to Mark Twain, right?!

"The coldest winter I ever spent, was a summer in San Francisco."

"...hates California,  it's cold and it's damp"

  (attributed to Lorenz Hart.)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

"...hates California,  it's cold and it's damp"

  (attributed to Lorenz Hart.)

Any particular reason why you're now bringing up that tramp who gets too hungry for dinner at 8 here, MissW???

(...oh...wait...never mind)

;)

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Except for The Long Goodbye Chandler's novels are relatively short, in the 200 to 240 page range,

so there's no problem for folks who don't like doorstop books.

Long ago I discovered that novels over about 350 pages are probably too long.  Especially for mystery, thriller, crime, etc.  Also noted that some good authors started with books about 350 pages, but now write ones that are in the 450 category.  Lots of meandering, philosophizing and repetition.

Actually for mysteries and thrillers, of which I read a lot, about 250 pages is the best length.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Instead of Ross MacDonald and Raymond Chandler, try David Goodis and Jim Thompson.

The Set-Up, just aired on TCM, good name for a professional boxer, Stoker Thompson, but not too good of a film noir.  You got to move fast.  Can’t hang around second guessing yourself about some dame.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...