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12 hours ago, Dargo said:

Any particular reason why you're now bringing up that tramp who gets too hungry for dinner at 8 here, MissW???

(...oh...wait...never mind)

;)

I love this song, but I was always puzzled by the allusion to California being   "cold and damp".  As a Canadian,  one who'd never been to California, I'd always thought California was mostly warm and sunny.   Guess San Francisco is different - I'd love to go there.  (but the song doesn't specify  San Francisco, it just says "California".)

This is a great song, and nobody does it better than Frank.  I love the way the lyrics at first seem insulting, until you actually listen to them, and then you realize that the lady in the song is completely admirable,  authentic, true to herself, doesn't put on an act, etc. etc.

Can't resist:  (although I don't think anyone here would try to argue that "Pal Joey" is a noir, 'cause it ain't.  still, any excuse to post this song...)

 

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

I love this song, but I was always puzzled by the allusion to California being   "cold and damp".  As a Canadian,  one who'd never been to California, I'd always thought California was mostly warm and sunny.   Guess San Francisco is different - I'd love to go there.  (but the song doesn't specify  San Francisco, it just says "California".)

This is a great song, and nobody does it better than Frank.  I love the way the lyrics at first seem insulting, until you actually listen to them, and then you realize that the lady in the song is completely admirable,  authentic, true to herself, doesn't put on an act, etc. etc.

Can't resist:  (although I don't think anyone here would try to argue that "Pal Joey" is a noir, 'cause it ain't.  still, any excuse to post this song...)

 

I've been to San Francisco a few times.  At the times I've gone, it's been sunny and nice. Every time I've been there though, it's never been hot, not like in Southern California.  I've been to San Francisco once when it was overcast and a little chilly--but as a native Oregonian, it didn't bother me.  In San Francisco though, it isn't unusual for there to be a lot of fog and drizzly conditions in the summer. 

In Southern California, it's almost always been nice weather when we've gone.  During the last time we were there, in April of 2019, it was upper 70s the whole time--fabulous weather.  Another time we were there in September, it was upper 80s-lower 90s and it was uncomfortable.  

San Diego has fabulous weather as well. 

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55 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I've been to San Francisco a few times.  At the times I've gone, it's been sunny and nice. Every time I've been there though, it's never been hot, not like in Southern California.  I've been to San Francisco once when it was overcast and a little chilly--but as a native Oregonian, it didn't bother me.  In San Francisco though, it isn't unusual for there to be a lot of fog and drizzly conditions in the summer. 

In Southern California, it's almost always been nice weather when we've gone.  During the last time we were there, in April of 2019, it was upper 70s the whole time--fabulous weather.  Another time we were there in September, it was upper 80s-lower 90s and it was uncomfortable.  

San Diego has fabulous weather as well. 

Well, speedy, looks like you'll be going to California again, come October.  I'm excited for you to take this trip  (hey,  "get hip, take this California trip,"....don't suppose you're going on Route 66, are you?)  it sounds like everything you're planning guarantees a fabulous time !   And yes, check out the weather for us while you're there  (hopefully nice, but maybe just one rainy day will make you feel like you're in a noir - especially if you're going to Musso and Frank's!)

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7 hours ago, ElCid said:

Long ago I discovered that novels over about 350 pages are probably too long.  Especially for mystery, thriller, crime, etc.  Also noted that some good authors started with books about 350 pages, but now write ones that are in the 450 category.  Lots of meandering, philosophizing and repetition.

Actually for mysteries and thrillers, of which I read a lot, about 250 pages is the best length.

I've never minded lengthy novels, though just because a novel is long doesn't necessarily mean

it's also worthwhile. Except for one or two exceptions, most of Dickens' novels are over 500 pages

and many of them significantly over, but I still enjoy them. I think The Long Goodbye is around 350

pages long. Maybe mystery and crime novels are a law unto themselves and are better if they don't

drag on too long and keep things relatively brief. The four Sherlock Holmes novels are rather short,

on average maybe 125 pages or so. 

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

Well, speedy, looks like you'll be going to California again, come October.  I'm excited for you to take this trip  (hey,  "get hip, take this California trip,"....don't suppose you're going on Route 66, are you?)  it sounds like everything you're planning guarantees a fabulous time !   And yes, check out the weather for us while you're there  (hopefully nice, but maybe just one rainy day will make you feel like you're in a noir - especially if you're going to Musso and Frank's!)

I was trying to see if I could fit the famous Barney's Beanery into my trip.  It is on the original Route 66.  Most of the original Route 66 is gone, but there are bits and pieces left between LA and Chicago. I've been on a piece of it in Arizona when my family went to Grand Canyon, Hoover Dam and Las Vegas. 

I have a laundry list of things I want to do in LA.  There's no way I'll be able to fit it all in, but I'll try.

And, while I don't mind the rain (usually), I hope it doesn't rain! I can have that at home.  I want sunshine! 

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Here is a version of The Lady is a Tramp by Bireli Lagrene.     For me he is one of the top 2 - 3 guitarist on the planet.

When he did the album Blue Eyes,  he decided to sing this song.    

 

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9 hours ago, ElCid said:

Long ago I discovered that novels over about 350 pages are probably too long.  Especially for mystery, thriller, crime, etc.  Also noted that some good authors started with books about 350 pages, but now write ones that are in the 450 category.  Lots of meandering, philosophizing and repetition.

Actually for mysteries and thrillers, of which I read a lot, about 250 pages is the best length.

Elizabeth George, once a good mystery writer, has now moved on to the 600-800 page doorstop range.

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8 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I've been to San Francisco a few times.  At the times I've gone, it's been sunny and nice. Every time I've been there though, it's never been hot, not like in Southern California.  I've been to San Francisco once when it was overcast and a little chilly--but as a native Oregonian, it didn't bother me.  In San Francisco though, it isn't unusual for there to be a lot of fog and drizzly conditions in the summer. 

In Southern California, it's almost always been nice weather when we've gone.  During the last time we were there, in April of 2019, it was upper 70s the whole time--fabulous weather.  Another time we were there in September, it was upper 80s-lower 90s and it was uncomfortable.  

San Diego has fabulous weather as well. 

Speedy and MissW.

During Spring the inland land mass of the west coast begins heating up and rising the atmosphere and thus in turn begins drawing the cool mist and fog formed by the cold water of the north-to-south gulf stream which runs along the west coast in for about 3-5 or more miles inland daily. This weather/climate phenomenon is a yearly occurrence until mid-Summer, and the further north up the coast, the later in the year it burns off during the day.

In Los Angeles, we natives always called this the "June Gloom". And, further north in San Francisco this weather phenomenon can extend well into the months of July and August.

And so the reason for that saying I posted earlier which has been attributed to Mark Twain and who for a while lived in San Francisco, a city I've always thought the most beautiful in all the U.S.

(...and one, yes MissW, you should definitely put on an itinerary to one day visit)

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5 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Barney's Beanery

Barney's, El Coyote, Cantor's. All pretty close to each other. Casa Vega over the hill in the valley on Ventura has better food and Margi's than Coyote. Musso and Frank's for a few Martini's. The Rainbow on Sunset can be very interesting later in the evening. Decisions, decisions...

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Speedy and MissW.

During Spring the inland land mass of the west coast begins heating up and rising the atmosphere and thus in turn begins drawing the cool mist and fog formed by the cold water of the north-to-south gulf stream which runs along the west coast in for about 3-5 or more miles inland daily. This weather/climate phenomenon is a yearly occurrence until mid-Summer, and the further north up the coast, the later in the year it burns off during the day.

In Los Angeles, we natives always called this the "June Gloom". And, further north in San Francisco this weather phenomenon can extend well into the months of July and August.

And so the reason for that saying I posted earlier which has been attributed to Mark Twain and who for a while lived in San Francisco, a city I've always thought the most beautiful in all the U.S.

(...and one, yes MissW, you should definitely put on an itinerary to one day visit)

I love San Francisco! It's such a fun city and I agree that it's gorgeous.  The Golden Gate Bridge is so gorgeous and such an impressive architectural feat.  The last time I was there, I visited the Palace of Fine Arts and that was amazing. I've stayed at the Hotel Vertigo that used to be the Hotel Empire where Kim Novak's character lived in Vertigo.  That was super cool. I've also been to the Museum of Modern Art, the cable cars, a cruise around Alcatraz, Pier 39, Fisherman's Wharf, The Embarcadero, Chinatown, Ghirardelli Square, a cruise around Alcatraz... I'd love to do some more of the "deeper cuts" the next time I'm there.  Next year, we might plan a small trip to Monterey, because the amazing Monterey Bay Aquarium will have a new exhibit. 

I also want to go to Bodega Bay which I think is in that same area somewhere.

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40 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

Barney's, El Coyote, Cantor's. All pretty close to each other. Casa Vega over the hill in the valley on Ventura has better food and Margi's than Coyote. Musso and Frank's for a few Martini's. The Rainbow on Sunset can be very interesting later in the evening. Decisions, decisions...

I have reservations at Musso & Franks. It's within walking distance to my hotel and the famous Larry Edmunds bookstore.

We're also looking at the Rainbow for dinner and perhaps the Whisky-A-Go-Go for a drink afterwards.  This also depends on if there is a show going on and if so, what's the cover charge.

Is Coyote the restaurant that Sharon Tate & Co. ate at before that horrible evening in 1969?

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8 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I have reservations at Musso & Franks. It's within walking distance to my hotel and the famous Larry Edmunds bookstore.

We're also looking at the Rainbow for dinner and perhaps the Whisky-A-Go-Go for a drink afterwards.  This also depends on if there is a show going on and if so, what's the cover charge.

Is Coyote the restaurant that Sharon Tate & Co. ate at before that horrible evening in 1969?

If you want the best tour of a studio, do the Warner Brothers tour, if they are open. One of the stops is at the museum on the lot where you can see sets, props, etc. of former Warners productions. Avoid the Universal Studio tour.

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9 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Is Coyote the restaurant that Sharon Tate & Co. ate at before that horrible evening in 1969?

It is. But it's just a great place to hang out for some cheap(er) Mexican style food and beverages, to be honest it's the drinks most come for. I'm biased because it was my hang out in the early 90s. The place was always packed with a line out the door, but we got the Goodfellas-Coppa treatment.  The Rainbow will be interesting. Food was always very good and you never knew who was going to show up. Might want to check out the Roxy since it's right next door to the Rainbow, see what's happening there. I'm jealous. 

 

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Back to Noir Alley.  I have watched Touch of Evil twice before and never thought much of it.  Started watching it again this morning and still don't think much of it.   Wells appears to be half-drunk all the time and garbles his speech.  I realize he is supposed to be an alcoholic or a drunk, but still he overplays it to the detriment of the movie.

In addition, I find the plot confusing other than the frame-up and disjointed in the way the scenes just seem to jump around.  The camera angles add nothing to the movie, but rather seem to be affectations by Wells.

As for Orson Wells, the only movie I like him in is The Long Hot Summer, but even there he overacts or poorly acts.  Again gives the impression of an always half-drunk, obese man garbling his speech.

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I’ve seen it before as well, but wanted to come at it again with the overused “willing suspension of disbelief.”   I enjoyed this go-around immensely.  Worth every penny as they say.  Loved that unshaven look.  Thought it moved at a good clip, the camera work top notch, as well as the music.  Heston might have started stiff but surprised me later with a damn good performance.  Marlene Dietrich was hypnotic.  I did spot one flaw - Hank left a good two fingers of whiskey on the bar when Pete took him outside.  No alcoholic, especially one falling off the wagon after 12 years, would do that.  However, that was atoned for by the mumbled reply by Hank when Pete accused him of having too much - “Ah, how much is enough?”

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14 hours ago, Dargo said:

Speedy and MissW.

During Spring the inland land mass of the west coast begins heating up and rising the atmosphere and thus in turn begins drawing the cool mist and fog formed by the cold water of the north-to-south gulf stream which runs along the west coast in for about 3-5 or more miles inland daily. This weather/climate phenomenon is a yearly occurrence until mid-Summer, and the further north up the coast, the later in the year it burns off during the day.

In Los Angeles, we natives always called this the "June Gloom". And, further north in San Francisco this weather phenomenon can extend well into the months of July and August.

And so the reason for that saying I posted earlier which has been attributed to Mark Twain and who for a while lived in San Francisco, a city I've always thought the most beautiful in all the U.S.

(...and one, yes MissW, you should definitely put on an itinerary to one day visit)

I had never heard of June Gloom until I was traveling to LA, specifically Manhattan Beach & El Segundo, about every 3 weeks.  When my June trip came up, I thought "It's June.  It's hot here.  It's Southern California, so it must be hot there."  I arrived to cool temperatures and foggy/misty weather.  I had to go buy a jacket.  It wasn't until I started traveling there for work that I realized how variable the weather is in the LA area.  There's not just one forecast for LA - there's 4 or 5 at least (coast, inland, deserts, mountains, valley, etc)

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I had never seen this film so I was looking forward to seeing it. However, I have mixed feelings. I like parts of it, but overall I just couldn't get into it.  I usually like seeing Orson Wells and  generally like most of his films.  Also, I agree with Eddie that Heston's role would have been better if a Hispanic actor had played the part. I've never considered Heston to be that great. He seems to always be the same character whether it's BEN HUR or PLANET OF THE APES. The highlight for me was Marlene Dietrich. She was as bewitchingly beautiful as ever. Obviously, Wells' character had "let himself go" since they were involved.  I cannot picture her with him as he looked in the film. Probably the most interesting thing I learned was Francis Ford Coppola actually approached Joseph Calliea about playing Vito Corleone in THE GODFATHER before selecting Marlon Brando.  I guess I understand why TOUCH OF EVIL is so highly regarded. It just didn't excite me like I thought it would considering the cast. 

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I love "Touch of Evil".  It's got so much going on in it, story-wise, and the camera shots are sensational.  The plot sometime can be as tough to follow like it was in say, "The Big Sleep", but overall, the acting can't be touched.  Yes, it might have been better if somebody like Ricardo Montalban had been put in the role of Mike Vargas, but as Eddie Muller said at the beginning of the show...No Heston, No Picture.  That was the one prerequisite for making the film, and Orson Welles, who I regard as one of the finest actors from Hollywood's Golden Age,  was one of those people who had the allure to get other people to work with him, even if they didn't get a screen credit.  There are a lot of characters in it, and I have to think most of them had a blast making this picture.  On top of all this, "Touch of Evil" is a Universal-International film, and as we've seen, much to our chagrin, Universal is pretty stingy in letting TCM show some of its stuff.  This movie, however, is an exception to the rule.

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4 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

I had never heard of June Gloom until I was traveling to LA, specifically Manhattan Beach & El Segundo, about every 3 weeks.  When my June trip came up, I thought "It's June.  It's hot here.  It's Southern California, so it must be hot there."  I arrived to cool temperatures and foggy/misty weather.  I had to go buy a jacket.  It wasn't until I started traveling there for work that I realized how variable the weather is in the LA area.  There's not just one forecast for LA - there's 4 or 5 at least (coast, inland, deserts, mountains, valley, etc)

Once when I was visiting San Francisco, I heard the TV weatherman say, "Highs today in the Bay Area will be between the 60s and the 90s."

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Once when I was visiting San Francisco, I heard the TV weatherman say, "Highs today in the Bay Area will be between the 60s and the 90s."

Kind of hard to get that forecast wrong...

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Thanks so much for showing Touch of Evil on Noir Alley. At long last. 

So happy that I've finally had the opportunity to see both this and Third Man on my favorite TCM series. 

I know Touch of Evil, inside out. I find so many things to love, and consistently find new, little things that only reinforce that love. 

Eddie's comments were worth the watch, as he holds the film with the kind of reverence I think it easily deserves. 

I've seen the film many times in the theater, and that is the BEST way to watch it; the big screen is just overflowing with detail. Seeing it screen here is like comfort food. Great film, one of my absolute favorites, and I look forward to seeing what others here think of it. 

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8 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

I had never heard of June Gloom until I was traveling to LA, specifically Manhattan Beach & El Segundo, about every 3 weeks.  When my June trip came up, I thought "It's June.  It's hot here.  It's Southern California, so it must be hot there."  I arrived to cool temperatures and foggy/misty weather.  I had to go buy a jacket.  It wasn't until I started traveling there for work that I realized how variable the weather is in the LA area.  There's not just one forecast for LA - there's 4 or 5 at least (coast, inland, deserts, mountains, valley, etc)

Yep, Tex. "Had to buy a jacket" during the month of June. I can certainly understand this of course, and especially considering the last house I owned in SoCal was located just a couple of miles inland from Manhattan Beach. And yep again, your "weather forecast" comment about all the micro-climates in the L.A. area was spot-on too.

And now re Touch of Evil.

I've said it before and I'll say it again now...I've loved this film since the first I watched it some 20 years ago now, EXCEPT for one thing about it.

(...that being that I've always found its later dubbed in soundtrack distracting as hell)

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7 minutes ago, goodvibe61 said:

Eddie's comments were worth the watch

The two comments that most describe the movie are "A wild night in a sleazy town" and the film "luxuriates in excess".  It's like what happens to a normal 9 to 5'er when they've taken a wrong turn on the way home and spend the next 12 hours trying to survive among the town's demented night shift. Griffen Dunne stars in a Scorsese movie called After Hours with a similar treatment, but in Touch of Evil we are the ones who've taken the wrong turn.

Yes it's great art but there's so much from the genre that is. The only thing that really stands out to me is Venice Beach and the mobile shots driving down the Speedway. It was great stuff ten years earlier in I Love Trouble and it's great in this one too.

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On 5/15/2021 at 3:10 PM, misswonderly3 said:

I love this song, but I was always puzzled by the allusion to California being   "cold and damp".  As a Canadian,  one who'd never been to California, I'd always thought California was mostly warm and sunny.   Guess San Francisco is different - I'd love to go there.  (but the song doesn't specify  San Francisco, it just says "California".)

This is a great song, and nobody does it better than Frank.  I love the way the lyrics at first seem insulting, until you actually listen to them, and then you realize that the lady in the song is completely admirable,  authentic, true to herself, doesn't put on an act, etc. etc.

Can't resist:  (although I don't think anyone here would try to argue that "Pal Joey" is a noir, 'cause it ain't.  still, any excuse to post this song...)

 

It's meant as a joke.

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