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Where exactly was Eva Gabor in the film? Did she get cut? Zsa Zsa I knew, she has a few lines. But Eva? That was the first I heard about it.

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On 5/15/2021 at 6:49 PM, speedracer5 said:

I was trying to see if I could fit the famous Barney's Beanery into my trip.  It is on the original Route 66.  Most of the original Route 66 is gone, but there are bits and pieces left between LA and Chicago. I've been on a piece of it in Arizona when my family went to Grand Canyon, Hoover Dam and Las Vegas. 

I have a laundry list of things I want to do in LA.  There's no way I'll be able to fit it all in, but I'll try.

And, while I don't mind the rain (usually), I hope it doesn't rain! I can have that at home.  I want sunshine! 

Dont forget the Chinese courtyard. You and hubby can channel Lucy and Ethel!

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2 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Dont forget the Chinese courtyard. You and hubby can channel Lucy and Ethel!

Lol.  We went to Grauman's Chinese last time we were in Hollywood.  So I may/may not do this again.  I felt like Ethel comparing all my feet in the footprints.  My feet seemingly were enormous compared to the prints.  And I'm only 5'2 so I don't have enormous feet.  It didn't help though that almost all the women's prints are made in high heels and I was wearing flat sandals.  Also, I think age has shrunk a lot of the footprints--even the men's footprints are small.

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2 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Lol.  We went to Grauman's Chinese last time we were in Hollywood.  So I may/may not do this again.  I felt like Ethel comparing all my feet in the footprints.  My feet seemingly were enormous compared to the prints.  And I'm only 5'2 so I don't have enormous feet.  It didn't help though that almost all the women's prints are made in high heels and I was wearing flat sandals.  Also, I think age has shrunk a lot of the footprints--even the men's footprints are small.

People were smaller back then too.......

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4 minutes ago, Hibi said:

People were smaller back then too.......

That's true, but even the men's footprints were tiny compared to my feet.   A lot of the women's feet though were super small, but it was hard to gauge because the prints were done in tiny heels.  The handprints were a little easier to match.  I did look for William Holden because I wanted to sit on the tile, but I didn't see it. 

"Pardon me, ma'am, are you sitting on John Wayne?"

"No she's sitting on Bill Holden."

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

That's true, but even the men's footprints were tiny compared to my feet.   A lot of the women's feet though were super small, but it was hard to gauge because the prints were done in tiny heels.  The handprints were a little easier to match.  I did look for William Holden because I wanted to sit on the tile, but I didn't see it. 

"Pardon me, ma'am, are you sitting on John Wayne?"

"No she's sitting on Bill Holden."

Yes, the heels definitely distort the size.

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Touch of Evil has wonderful visuals and is full of quirky characters. My favorite was Dennis Weaver playing

a guy even more useless than Chester. And Welles is a hoot with his flabby face and drunken slurred speech.

He looks like he might be a extra large blow up balloon that the guy from The Third Man might be selling.

And the grimy low rent locales are good too. As entertaining as all these elements are, the whole is somewhat

less than the parts that make it up. 

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Also loved the trash blowing across the streets, and the trash in the canal when Welles goes back first into the water.  Like that saying - it’s hard to kill bad grass.

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3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

That's true, but even the men's footprints were tiny compared to my feet.   A lot of the women's feet though were super small, but it was hard to gauge because the prints were done in tiny heels.  The handprints were a little easier to match.  I did look for William Holden because I wanted to sit on the tile, but I didn't see it. 

"Pardon me, ma'am, are you sitting on John Wayne?"

"No she's sitting on Bill Holden."

This reminds me of the time my Uncle Slim from Indiana (of whom btw I once asked my mother why they called him that when he must've weighed 300lb if he was an once) was visiting us back in the mid-'60s and we took him to Grauman's Chinese.

When we got there, Uncle Slim saw this imprint here...

OIP.vINwXL6u6x--1IVKgWmdPwHaFj?pid=ImgDe

...and rushed over to it, bent down and rubbed his hand across the imprint of her then insured for one million legs, giggled and said in very loud voice, "HEY! Looky HERE everybody! I'm runnin' my hand up and down my gal Betty Grable's gams here!"

(...yep, ol' Uncle Slim was a real cut-up, alright)

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On 5/15/2021 at 12:10 PM, misswonderly3 said:

I love this song, but I was always puzzled by the allusion to California being   "cold and damp".  As a Canadian,  one who'd never been to California, I'd always thought California was mostly warm and sunny.   Guess San Francisco is different - I'd love to go there.  (but the song doesn't specify  San Francisco, it just says "California".)

This is a great song, and nobody does it better than Frank.  I love the way the lyrics at first seem insulting, until you actually listen to them, and then you realize that the lady in the song is completely admirable,  authentic, true to herself, doesn't put on an act, etc. etc.

Can't resist:  (although I don't think anyone here would try to argue that "Pal Joey" is a noir, 'cause it ain't.  still, any excuse to post this song...)

 

Maybe it's a part of being a tramp to make errors like that. If she doesn't like something she'll give any reason.

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

As entertaining as all these elements are, the whole is somewhat less than the parts that make it up. 

. . . . what he said!

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Well it sounds like most posters really like TOUCH OF EVIL.  Far be it from me to question their judgement.  I'm still relatively new to the party  on this forum and I'm learning as I go.  The fact is I really didn't like Scotch whiskey the first time I tried it. Now it's my favorite brown libation.  I'll have to give TOUCH OF EVIL another chance before I make up my mind. 

Side note: After reading the novel THE GODFATHER I thought Marlon Brando was all wrong for the part the first time I saw it on film.  Boy! was I wrong about that first impression. Now I cannot imagine any other actor playing the role; even  Joseph Calleia. 

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The Godfather is a hellava novel to read.  Shoot, you can read it again and again and it only gets better.  In Cold Blood is like that.

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Touch of Evil has wonderful visuals and is full of quirky characters. My favorite was Dennis Weaver playing

a guy even more useless than Chester. And Welles is a hoot with his flabby face and drunken slurred speech.

He looks like he might be a extra large blow up balloon that the guy from The Third Man might be selling.

And the grimy low rent locales are good too. As entertaining as all these elements are, the whole is somewhat

less than the parts that make it up. 

Welles was only 41 or so (he turned 42 shortly after filming wrapped) when he filmed this.  He looks 30 years older.

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                                "...and drank too much wine before its time."

 

(...sorry Bronxie...just couldn't resist playing off your post up there) ;)

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4 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

Welles was only 41 or so (he turned 42 shortly after filming wrapped) when he filmed this.  He looks 30 years older.

I knew he was in his early forties at the time. He looks like he has one foot in the grave, even minus the

upcoming gunshot. Quite a contrast to Marlene Dietrich, who was in her mid 50s and looked great.

Like a lot of movie stars she fiddled with her age, though I believe she was fairly modest in that respect.

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11 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I knew he was in his early forties at the time. He looks like he has one foot in the grave, even minus the

upcoming gunshot. Quite a contrast to Marlene Dietrich, who was in her mid 50s and looked great.

Like a lot of movie stars she fiddled with her age, though I believe she was fairly modest in that respect.

This was just 9 months or so earlier (episode aired Oct 56), in a publicity still for the episode where he played himself on I Love Lucy.  He was working for Desilu, making a pilot for a proposed anthology series, and I suppose they got him on their sitcom in exchange, doing one of his magic tricks.  The pilot wasn't sold to a network, but it did win a Peabody award, and is still the only unsold pilot to have won a Peabody.

Though still fighting the battle of the bulge, he looks closer to his age here.  Lucy was 45.  Ellen Corby is also in this episode, playing Lucy's high school drama teacher, and she's only a couple months older than Ball, though she almost always played older than she was in most of her roles.

A Lost Orson Welles TV Pilot That's As Groundbreaking as “Citizen Kane” |  The New Yorker

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I figured it had to be make-up that made Wells look so bad in TOE. While he wasn't as handsome as some other of his contemporaries, he wasn't ugly. Obviously, his weight became a recurring problem as he aged.  I guess the beard helped hide the double (or triple) chins he acquired in his late 50s and 60s.  

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