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For Noir fans ("Noiristas" as Eddie likes to say), I would feel negligent if I didn't mention that the TCM daytime theme for Wednesday the 19th is Film Noir Road Trip.

Here is the lineup (times are ET):

   06:00 AM   The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)
   08:15 AM   Hell Drivers (1957)
   10:15 AM   Jeopardy (1953)
   11:45 AM   The Hitch-Hiker (1953)
   01:15 PM   Tomorrow Is Another Day (1951)
   03:00 PM   Detour (1945)
   04:15 PM   Gun Crazy (1950)
   06:00 PM   They Live by Night (1948)

The last 5 films have been previously featured on Noir Alley.

Check out the daily schedule on the 19th for more info:

https://www.tcm.com/schedule?icid=mainnav6-daily-schedule
 

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Thanks. I've seen them all multiple times. I'm not sure about Hell Drivers, but it sounds familiar.

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17 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

This was just 9 months or so earlier (episode aired Oct 56), in a publicity still for the episode where he played himself on I Love Lucy.  He was working for Desilu, making a pilot for a proposed anthology series, and I suppose they got him on their sitcom in exchange, doing one of his magic tricks.  The pilot wasn't sold to a network, but it did win a Peabody award, and is still the only unsold pilot to have won a Peabody.

Though still fighting the battle of the bulge, he looks closer to his age here.  Lucy was 45.  Ellen Corby is also in this episode, playing Lucy's high school drama teacher, and she's only a couple months older than Ball, though she almost always played older than she was in most of her roles.

 

I wonder if there was some padding involved as Welles always seems to wear some kind of jacket or overcoat

in the movie. Not that I'm discounting the possibility that Orson packed on a lot of pounds in that short a

period. 

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3 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I wonder if there was some padding involved as Welles always seem to wear some kind of jacket or overcoat

in the movie. Not that I'm discounting the possibility that Orson packed on a lot of pounds in that short a

period. 

Here he is, with Marlene Dietrich, out of costume...

MARLENE DIETRICH, ORSON WELLES, TOUCH OF EVIL, 1958 Stock Photo - Alamy

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7 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Guess it was all Orson. Putting the wide in widescreen.

Did you see that episode last night on Dateline? About the high school jock nude modeling??? How could they be THAT stupid????

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

Did you see that episode last night on Dateline? About the high school jock nude modeling??? How could they be THAT stupid????

No, I missed that one. It doesn't really sound like anything out of the ordinary these days.

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I wonder if there was some padding involved as Welles always seems to wear some kind of jacket or overcoat

in the movie. Not that I'm discounting the possibility that Orson packed on a lot of pounds in that short a

period. 

In regards to padding, maybe, but there's no doubt that Orson in Touch of Evil added onto his nose with putty when he played the part.

(...and something he did a number of times in his acting career, and because he was always self-conscious about what he felt was a nose that was too small for his face)

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13 minutes ago, Dargo said:

In regards to padding, maybe, but there's no doubt that Orson in Touch of Evil added onto his nose with putty when he played the part.

(...and something he did a number of times in his acting career, and because he was always self-conscious about what he felt was a nose that was too small for his face)

https://cinemasojourns.com/2014/03/30/the-many-noses-of-orson-welles/

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7 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

For Noir fans ("Noiristas" as Eddie likes to say), I would feel negligent if I didn't mention that the TCM daytime theme for Wednesday the 19th is Film Noir Road Trip.

Here is the lineup (times are ET):

   06:00 AM   The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)
   08:15 AM   Hell Drivers (1957)
   10:15 AM   Jeopardy (1953)
   11:45 AM   The Hitch-Hiker (1953)
   01:15 PM   Tomorrow Is Another Day (1951)
   03:00 PM   Detour (1945)
   04:15 PM   Gun Crazy (1950)
   06:00 PM   They Live by Night (1948)

The last 5 films have been previously featured on Noir Alley.

Check out the daily schedule on the 19th for more info:

https://www.tcm.com/schedule?icid=mainnav6-daily-schedule
 

For anyone who hasn't seen Hell Drivers, it's a fine British noir starring Stanley Baker and directed by the talented Cy Endfield (Zulu).

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12 minutes ago, kingrat said:

For anyone who hasn't seen Hell Drivers, it's a fine British noir starring Stanley Baker and directed by the talented Cy Endfield (Zulu).

Stanley Baker, eh?!

Now there's a guy with a face and a persona made for film noir if there ever was!

(...and while I knew he died relatively young, after just now checking into his Wiki bio page, it still kind'a shocks me that it was at only 48 years of age)

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4 hours ago, Vautrin said:

A la Casablanca, is TTOTSM noir? No. 

I would say the whole Tampico sequence is quite Noirish myself,

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

For anyone who hasn't seen Hell Drivers, it's a fine British noir starring Stanley Baker and directed by the talented Cy Endfield (Zulu).

Add Patrick McGoohan, Herbert Lom,  David McCallum and  Peggy Cummins to the cast

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6 hours ago, Dargo said:

In regards to padding, maybe, but there's no doubt that Orson in Touch of Evil added onto his nose with putty when he played the part.

(...and something he did a number of times in his acting career, and because he was always self-conscious about what he felt was a nose that was too small for his face)

I think the photo with Marlene Dietrich shows that Orson had no need of padding. I didn't notice his

schnoz all that much because his whole face is a disaster area. The next time there is a Welles film

I'l have to take a look at his nose. Of course he may have thought it too small and other people never

thought so. 

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I would say the whole Tampico sequence is quite Noirish myself,

Yes there are some scenes that are noirish, but overall I wouldn't call it a film noir.

There are late night scenes at Rick's nightclub that are noirish, but that doesn't mean

Casablanca is a noir, though I see it as more noir than TTOTSM.

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7 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Yes there are some scenes that are noirish, but overall I wouldn't call it a film noir.

There are late night scenes at Rick's nightclub that are noirish, but that doesn't mean

Casablanca is a noir, though I see it as more noir than TTOTSM.

I would actually lean the other way, Casablanca is basically a love story, while  TTOTSM is a dark story about greed and Bogart is your typically alienated and obsessed Noir character. 

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13 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Add Patrick McGoohan, Herbert Lom,  David McCallum and  Peggy Cummins to the cast

And  Sean Connery..Baker worked again with Endfield for Zulu,,Baker  was the producer of this excellent movie.

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18 hours ago, Vautrin said:

A la Casablanca, is TTOTSM noir? No. 

Agreed.  Maybe the poster had it mixed up with "High Sierra",  which at least could be argued it's a noir.  Not "Treasure of the Sierra Madre" though.

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About Touch of Evil:  The first time I saw the film, it had a different opening, I think the one that Welles actually didn't like.  Eddie 'splained about this in his intro , and sure enough, we get a different opening few minutes,  I guess the one that Welles had actually wanted.

But, not that I'd ever dare suggest that I know better than Orson Welles,  but I don't understand why he preferred the version of the opening shown on Noir Alley the other day.  To me that other opening is one of the best things about "Touch of Evil".  It's got not only that famous long shot, but the great music to go with it.  You get a little of the music in the other "approved" version, but you don't get that theme continuing on along with the long take, like in the earlier version I saw and was so impressed with.

I found the version of the opening sequence,  the one I saw originally.  It knocked me out.  here it is:  (it's mainly the music that's different, in the version we saw on Noir Alley,  you don't get that great music all the way through the opening sequence.  It makes such a difference.)

I dunno, seems a lot more dramatic and noirish to me.  Wonder why Orson didn't want to go with that one?

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17 hours ago, Vautrin said:

No, I missed that one. It doesn't really sound like anything out of the ordinary these days.

It was a good one! It wasn't really funny what happened, but I had to laugh at their cluelessness.....

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26 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

I dunno, seems a lot more dramatic and noirish to me.  Wonder why Orson didn't want to go with that one?

Most likely the answer is:  because it wasn't his choice;    

 

 

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15 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Most likely the answer is:  because it wasn't his choice;    

 

 

I assume he didnt want the credits distracting from the long take?

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46 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Most likely the answer is:  because it wasn't his choice;    

 

 

Gee, I never would've thought of that.  Good thing we have you here to  straighten people like me out.

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