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12 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

4th time was the charm for me. 

Sanchez plants the bomb because he thinks he's going to marry the daughter, Marcia Linnekar. She is in cahoots with her attorney though and he anticipates Quinlan eventually becoming involved in the investigation. Once that happens, Sanchez is the ready made patsy. It's just a subplot and has nothing to do with the Grandi crime family.

You have the scheme to discredit Vargas right. But I don't think they actually use heroin. The hot-rod hellcats make her believe they used the real stuff but there's mention that it was sodium pentathol, as Vargas had suspected. 

There's several  plots going on that intersect with Quinlan , the bombing, the Grandi arrest and who will be head of the crime family, Quinlan's history of planting evidence and Quinlan's relationship with his partner, candy bars, hooch and Tanya the fortune teller.

Right,  thanks,  Moe.

I did post a bit of a write-up about my thoughts concerning  Touch of Evil a few days ago,  and in it  I did mention that "Uncle Joe" Grandi explicitly states that Susan Vargas was NOT shot up with heroin, but with sodium pentothal.  So yes, I was aware of that -- suggesting that Joe Grandi, sleezy though he was, perhaps wasn't quite as evil as we originally might have thought.

I figure you didn't see that post, it's probably a page or so back by now. 

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20 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

The opening scene crime is kind of a MacGuffin.   It's just a way to get Vargas meddling into Quinlan's doings to get the story going and to illustrate Quinlan's corruption, and since the crime crossed borders (bomb planted in Mexico, but exploded in the US), it's sort of reasonable for Mexican police (Vargas) to be involved.   There had to be some mechanism to get both sides involved in order for the flipped corruption angle to be explored (corruption in the US police instead of the usual trope of Mexican police corruption)

My question is why would you honeymoon in a dump of a town like that (on either side of the border)?  What's wrong with Acapulco (the tourist hotspot in Mexico at that time)?

 

Actually,  it's often hard to tell when the characters are in Mexico,  and when they're in the States.  I'm pretty sure that's on purpose.

As for why they'd choose to have their honeymoon in a "dump of a town"  (agreed, both border towns on either side seem , well,   un-honeymoonish),  one might also ask, what kind of a honeymoon was it anyway,  when the poor bride is constantly being deserted by her husband?  (  "Don't worry, honey, just stay put,  I have to go, but I'll be back.  Don't worry about being surrounded by a bunch of creepy thugs shooting you up and leering at you,  never mind if you wake up in a strange room with the face of a strangled man dangling over you,  and never mind about being arrested and stuck in a jail cell.....I just have one or two little things to attend to and then I'll be back !"

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On 5/19/2021 at 7:57 AM, misswonderly3 said:

seems a lot more dramatic and noirish to me.

I gotta agree with you. But I'm a big fan of well done credits. Long live Saul Bass!!!

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1 minute ago, Moe Howard said:

I gotta agree with you. But I'm a big fan of well done credits. Long live Saul Bass!!!

I love the Saul Bass graphics 🎬🎪🎬

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Have to read some Georges Simenon.

Eddie Muller really knows his stuff.

Dianne Foster (or her character role) was way too fluff.  The bathroom shaving and shower scene should have hit the cutting floor.

The music was neither here nor there, didn’t add, didn’t subtract.  What was the name of that awful Bruce Dern movie (he’s a disabled vet) and the soundtrack is almost entirely made up of  period rock and roll songs?  The soundtrack ruined that one (well the acting sucked too).  I’m guessing Jane Fonda was nearby.

Richard Conte was good.  Easy to watch (away from Foster).  Supporting actors like Eddie mentioned were very cool.  Conte has big ears.  Lots of ear shots.  James Darren has little bitty ears.

Brand names were evident (love that) - Budweiser and Old Crow on the table in the hotel room when Eddie puts all the pieces together.

I enjoyed it.  The Brothers Rico. 90 minutes, didn’t drag apart from Foster.  Didn’t have to read anything into anything (like that too).

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I'd seen The Brothers Rico before, in fact, I own it on a DVD set of Columbia noirs.   ( Eddie's right, by the way, about Columbia noirs being much less shadowy than some other studios that made noirs.  Sometimes they're downright sun-drenched.  But that's ok, it doesn't take away from how well-done and how noirish they are in other ways.)

Just a quick response to Thompson's complaint about the wife character:

1 hour ago, Thompson said:

Dianne Foster (or her character role) was way too fluff.  The bathroom shaving and shower scene should have hit the cutting floor.

But, I don't know how many noirs you've seen, but the trope of the devoted wife is quite common. There are many noirs that depict such scenes, the male protagonist joking around with his wife  in some pleasant and seemingly safe domestic setting, whether it's shaving, playing with their kid (sometimes there's a kid),  eating the dinner (or often, breakfast) the devoted wife has prepared,  or "getting frisky" with her....these kinds of scenes are not at all foreign to noir.  They're there for a reason: to show           A)  that the male protagonist is basically a sympathetic character, one the audience can like and/or relate to   and  B )  that the protagonist has got something to lose. These playful domestic scenes are carefully orchestrated to demonstrate how happy our hero is with his wife /family/  home   and how much he does not want to be dragged down into criminal activity again.  

I do realize that as Georges Simenon wrote it,  Eddie Rico may not have been quite so devoted to home and family -- haven't read the book, so I don't know.  But as Eddie pointed out, this is a movie adaptation of Simenon's novel, and as such, it actually, as I said, follows the pattern of many noirs in including such light romantic domestic scenes.

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You are right.  I get the archetype, don’t have a problem with it, but here it rings a bit falser or cornier, and it doesn’t work for me.  

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25 minutes ago, Thompson said:

You are right.  I get the archetype, don’t have a problem with it, but here it rings a bit falser or cornier, and it doesn’t work for me.  

Well, those kinds of scenes always ring a bit corny;  they are by their nature corny.  Another example I just thought of is the one in Kiss of Death  between Victor Mature and Coleen Gray, happily ( and newly) married,  and kidding around about coffee or some such thing.  She sits on his knee,  she teases him about cleaning up before she serves dinner (or whatever she's making), etc. etc.    Very corny, but it gets the point across.

But I do get why you don't like such scenes.  Chacon a son gout.

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

But, I don't know how many noirs you've seen, but the trope of the devoted wife is quite common. There are many noirs that depict such scenes, the male protagonist joking around with his wife  in some pleasant and seemingly safe domestic setting, whether it's shaving, playing with their kid (sometimes there's a kid),  eating the dinner (or often, breakfast) the devoted wife has prepared,  or "getting frisky" with her....these kinds of scenes are not at all foreign to noir.  They're there for a reason: to show           A)  that the male protagonist is basically a sympathetic character, one the audience can like and/or relate to   and  B )  that the protagonist has got something to lose. These playful domestic scenes are carefully orchestrated to demonstrate how happy our hero is with his wife /family/  home   and how much he does not want to be dragged down into criminal activity again.  

 

Sometimes those domestic scenes are a predictable setup for some kind of tragedy that is about to strike involving the protagonist's "perfect" family. You know, for example, that the wife of the protagonist may not be long with us if she is played by a no name or minor actress. I'm thinking, for example, of Glenn Ford's early scenes of domestic bliss in The Big Heat. I'm sure there must be some other illustrations of this, though at the moment that is the only one that comes to mind.

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42 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Sometimes those domestic scenes are a predictable setup for some kind of tragedy that is about to strike involving the protagonist's "perfect" family. You know, for example, that the wife of the protagonist may not be long with us if she is played by a no name or minor actress. I'm thinking, for example, of Glenn Ford's early scenes of domestic bliss in The Big Heat. I'm sure there must be some other illustrations of this, though at the moment that is the only one that comes to mind.

Yes, that could be reason C)  for the domestic bliss scene:  to show that the wife  ( and occasionally also child)  are important to the main character, and to set things up for a narrative that might involve the beloved wife being kidnapped or killed  ( as in "The Big Heat"), which in turn intensifies the story in that the hero now has nothing to lose, and of course, wants to get the criminals more than ever to avenge his wife's death.

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

Yes, that could be reason C)  for the domestic bliss scene:  to show that the wife  ( and occasionally also child)  are important to the main character, and to set things up for a narrative that might involve the beloved wife being kidnapped or killed  ( as in "The Big Heat"), which in turn intensifies the story in that the hero now has nothing to lose, and of course, wants to get the criminals more than ever to avenge his wife's death.

The Big Heat (1953)

Happy Domestic Bliss Glenn Ford. (Mmm, what a yummy meal!).

Jocelyn Brando is grabbed by neck by Glenn Ford in a scene from the... News  Photo - Getty Images

Post Family Tragedy Glenn Ford Out For Revenge

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I had seen The Brothers Rico several years ago and thought it was The Movie Dull. A friend who's a big fan of Phil Karlson says most Karlson aficionados are not crazy about this one. I always like Richard Conte, but this isn't one of his better vehicles. Not bad, just not very compelling.

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Big Heat (1953)

Happy Domestic Bliss Glenn Ford. (Mmm, what a yummy meal!).

Jocelyn Brando is grabbed by neck by Glenn Ford in a scene from the... News  Photo - Getty Images

Post Family Tragedy Glenn Ford Out For Revenge

 

I love The Big Heat,  it is one of my favourite noirs.  (which is saying something, since there are so many noirs I love.)

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9 hours ago, Thompson said:

Dianne Foster (or her character role) was way too fluff.  The bathroom shaving and shower scene should have hit the cutting floor.

I get your point. It was laid on a bit thick, the point of the happy couple had been made.

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7 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

These playful domestic scenes are carefully orchestrated to demonstrate how happy our hero is with his wife /family/  home   and how much he does not want to be dragged down into criminal activity again. 

And sometimes maybe over-orchestrated. It didn't bother in this case though Dianne Foster was fun to watch very convincing.

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15 hours ago, kingrat said:

I had seen The Brothers Rico several years ago and thought it was The Movie Dull. A friend who's a big fan of Phil Karlson says most Karlson aficionados are not crazy about this one. I always like Richard Conte, but this isn't one of his better vehicles. Not bad, just not very compelling.

I agree. Not a bad movie but while watching I thought it dragged on. I'm a fan of Richard Conte, in fact as a kid because of Ocean 11, I had a crush on him. this isn't his best. His character believing Kubik up until the almost end is not quite believeable for me. The performances by all I thought were very good but somehow it just dragged on and I agree King, not very compelling., although I did think the scenes of Gino brutally beaten and killed and Johnny knowing he's about to be killed were very dark and noirish, that happy ending did gave some relief from those scenes but I dont know, just didn't work for me. I'd give it a 6.5 to a 7 out of 10.

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16 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Big Heat (1953)

Happy Domestic Bliss Glenn Ford. (Mmm, what a yummy meal!).

Yeah . . .she's got a Fred Flintstone size steak and he's got a rock on a plate. That'll trigger most guys.

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17 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

 

I love The Big Heat,  it is one of my favourite noirs.  (which is saying something, since there are so many noirs I love.)

Just watched The Big Heat and Gilda for the first time last week.    Somehow Glenn Ford was unknown to me before.  He looks just like my grandfather when he was younger.  Loved both films.

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I thought THE BROTHERS RICO was OK. Eddie was right that Conte was in every scene. One thing Eddie didn't mention was that Kathryn Grant, who played Johnny's wife later became Bing Crosby's wife. She was probably best known in her later years for being the mother of US Men's Golf Amateur champion Nathaniel Crosby and Mary Crosby whose character  famously shot J.R. Ewing in the DALLAS TV show. 

 

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Anyone else notice that in Joseph Cotten's initial uncredited appearance in TOUCH OF EVIL, as he looks at the victim of the car bomb explosion . . .

Touch of Evil (1958) – FilmFanatic.org

and says, "Now you can strain him through a sieve" it's not his voice but it sounds exactly like that of Orson Welles.

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On 5/22/2021 at 9:30 PM, Moe Howard said:

But I'm a big fan of well done credits. Long live Saul Bass!!!

There is a fabulous documentary out there on Saul Bass. 

 

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