Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

I've been so busy I haven't been able to catch Noir Alley when its regularly presented on Sat or Sun. So I've been catching them On Demand (if they show up) lol. This is one film that I thought I'd seen already.  But surprisingly no, I must have gotten it confused with House of Strangers where Conte also has a set of brothers. This was a new one for me. lol

It. should be noted that after Bogart with 15 Noir, Richard Conte has the second most Noir appearances at 14 Noir.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Coming up on Noir Alley this weekend:    ACT OF VIOLENCE.

This is definitely one of my very favourite noirs.  Ok, I know I say that all the time  (believe it or not, there are quite a few noirs that are NOT on my "favourites" list.) Maybe I've said this or that noir is "one of my favourites" so many times, my saying it has no validity anymore.  (But hey, I love noirs, what can I say?)

Anyway,  truly,  Act of Violence really IS right up there in Noirsville for me-  I'd list it in my top 5.  

I've seen it quite a few times, and am never bored.  For one thing, I think the story is very compelling.  The two main characters are complex,  there's no clear "hero"; this makes for an unexpected turn in the film.  Of course I won't say anything more about that til after it's aired-  I hate spoilers myself.

But I can say that these two main characters are played by two of the best that "classic" Hollywood had to offer, and both of them are noir stalwarts: Van Heflin and Robert Ryan.  I love both these guys, both are veterans of film noir, and both are great actors.  They're both particularly memorable in  Act of Violence.

Also...interesting,  we just saw Janet Leigh in Noir Alley a couple of weeks ago    (as poor traumatized Susan Vargas in Touch of Evil ) and here she is again, playing a loving wife again.   Here she 's a lot younger, Act of Violence was made almost 10 years before Touch of Evil.    Janet Leigh was one of those actresses who, when she was young, somehow looked very young, all wide-eyed and innocent.  

Anyway,  if you haven't seen Act of Violence,  I suggest you try and make a point of watching or recording it this weekend.  Oh, one thing more:  it's interesting how the film segues from a decidedly UN-noirish setting to some of the most visually noir images in the classic noir canon.  So anyone who 's looking for shadows and twisty staircases and morally ambiguous characters, look no farther.   Act of Violence may start out sunny, but it gets increasingly dark, both visually and psychologically, as the film progresses.

(I hope that none of the above contains any spoilers, even of the vague kind.)

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard Conte unsettles me, ever since I first saw him as Lillian Roth's sadistic husband in I'LL CRY TOMORROW.  That performance left me queasy.  He's one of those actors that always look like they're going to punch someone in the face no matter what the role. (I put Charles Bickford in this category, lol)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Richard Conte unsettles me, ever since I first saw him as Lillian Roth's sadistic husband in I'LL CRY TOMORROW.  That performance left me queasy.  He's one of those actors that always look like they're going to punch someone in the face no matter what the role. (I put Charles Bickford in this category, lol)

 

Or maybe another "Charles" in this category too, Bronxie?

And as in..

.IDLbGHe25MSsmBE=&risl=&pid=ImgRaw

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Richard Conte unsettles me, ever since I first saw him as Lillian Roth's sadistic husband in I'LL CRY TOMORROW.  That performance left me queasy.  He's one of those actors that always look like they're going to punch someone in the face no matter what the role. (I put Charles Bickford in this category, lol)

 

That just shows what a good actor he was.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Dargo -- nah, Bronson always came across as a sweetie to me underneath all that Neanderthal brawn.

Have you seen Death Wish? That's some warm and fuzzy target practice right there.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Coming up on Noir Alley this weekend:    ACT OF VIOLENCE.

This is definitely one of my very favourite noirs.  Ok, I know I say that all the time  (believe it or not, there are quite a few noirs that are NOT on my "favourites" list.) Maybe I've said this or that noir is "one of my favourites" so many times, my saying it has no validity anymore.  (But hey, I love noirs, what can I say?)

Anyway,  truly,  Act of Violence really IS right up there in Noirsville for me-  I'd list it in my top 5.  

I've seen it quite a few times, and am never bored.  For one thing, I think the story is very compelling.  The two main characters are complex,  there's no clear "hero"; this makes for an unexpected turn in the film.  Of course I won't say anything more about that til after it's aired-  I hate spoilers myself.

But I can say that these two main characters are played by two of the best that "classic" Hollywood had to offer, and both of them are noir stalwarts: Van Heflin and Robert Ryan.  I love both these guys, both are veterans of film noir, and both are great actors.  They're both particularly memorable in  Act of Violence.

Also...interesting,  we just saw Janet Leigh in Noir Alley a couple of weeks ago    (as poor traumatized Susan Vargas in Touch of Evil ) and here she is again, playing a loving wife again.   Here she 's a lot younger, Act of Violence was made almost 10 years before Touch of Evil.    Janet Leigh was one of those actresses who, when she was young, somehow looked very young, all wide-eyed and innocent.  

Anyway,  if you haven't seen Act of Violence,  I suggest you try and make a point of watching or recording it this weekend.  Oh, one thing more:  it's interesting how the film segues from a decidedly UN-noirish setting to some of the most visually noir images in the classic noir canon.  So anyone who 's looking for shadows and twisty staircases and morally ambiguous characters, look no farther.   Act of Violence may start out sunny, but it gets increasingly dark, both visually and psychologically, as the film progresses.

(I hope that none of the above contains any spoilers, even of the vague kind.)

Well, this is exceptional news to me.  I have never heard of Act of Violence.  Robert Ryan is so intense, can’t wait to see him in this one.  I’m guessing right off that sentiment and girly stuff is at a minimum but he’s probably got that archetypical wife who is boss of the kitchen and maybe believable.  The plot sounds like something I wouldn’t like, so we shall see.  Probably the music will make the difference.  All these subliminal things make the difference.  And every facial expression - twitch of an eye, curl of a lip, the first drag from a newly lit cigarette.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Thompson said:

Well, this is exceptional news to me.  I have never heard of Act of Violence.  Robert Ryan is so intense, can’t wait to see him in this one.  I’m guessing right off that sentiment and girly stuff is at a minimum but he’s probably got that archetypical wife who is boss of the kitchen and maybe believable.  The plot sounds like something I wouldn’t like, so we shall see.  Probably the music will make the difference.  All these subliminal things make the difference.  And every facial expression - twitch of an eye, curl of a lip, the first drag from a newly lit cigarette.

Big fan of Act of Violence.    One performer in the film is Mary Astor.    She plays an aging woman-of-the-night.   Its great to see her in such a role after so many of the mother roles she played in the 40s.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/26/2021 at 5:08 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

Richard Conte unsettles me, ever since I first saw him as Lillian Roth's sadistic husband in I'LL CRY TOMORROW.  That performance left me queasy.  He's one of those actors that always look like they're going to punch someone in the face no matter what the role. (I put Charles Bickford in this category, lol)

 

I just saw I'll Cry Tomorrow for the first time last week.  I watched it in bed while I rested after feeling feverish from my second COVID shot.  When I'm not feeling well, something overly dramatic, intense, and/or weird is the only thing that I can watch.  I thought 'Tomorrow' was excellent, even though it definitely dealt with some very serious subject matter.  When Richard Conte's character comes on screen and introduces himself to Susan Hayward, I thought "finally! She'll find herself a man who isn't a loser."  Oh how wrong I was.  I was actually disheartened that his character turned out how he did.  I suppose he had no interest in getting on the wagon with Hayward, he was looking for a drinking buddy? Or he was so upset with her for falling off the wagon, he decided to punish her by falling off the wagon himself? 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of Richard Conte,   last night on MOVIES-TV I watched what I believe was Conte's best film noir;  the late in the cycle (1955),  The Big Combo.

This is a solid film with a fine cast of actors like Brian Donlevy as an aging Gangster replaced by Conte,  Helen Walker as Conte's wife,   gay henchmen Lee Van Clef and Earl Holliman,   Robert Middleton as a police captain,  John Hoyt as a ship captain with a secret on Conte,  Ted de Corsia as a member of the ship's crew,  and Jean Wallace as Conte's girl.       The other male co-star Cornel Wilde is also very effective,  giving one of his best performances  (well,  without having to do a lot of running!).   

The photography is excellent with many first rate noir visuals.     The ending scene with Wallace,  Conte,  and Wilde with Wallace directing a spot light on Conte to assist Wilde,  is one for the ages.     The film is also very open sexually with Conte having  a  mean and kinky streak.    Noir fans;  this is a must-see!

 

The Big Combo (1955) Joseph H. Lewis | Twenty Four FramesTHE BIG COMBO (1955) | New Granada

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/27/2021 at 8:57 PM, speedracer5 said:

I just saw I'll Cry Tomorrow for the first time last week.  I watched it in bed while I rested after feeling feverish from my second COVID shot.  When I'm not feeling well, something overly dramatic, intense, and/or weird is the only thing that I can watch.  I thought 'Tomorrow' was excellent, even though it definitely dealt with some very serious subject matter.  When Richard Conte's character comes on screen and introduces himself to Susan Hayward, I thought "finally! She'll find herself a man who isn't a loser."  Oh how wrong I was.  I was actually disheartened that his character turned out how he did.  I suppose he had no interest in getting on the wagon with Hayward, he was looking for a drinking buddy? Or he was so upset with her for falling off the wagon, he decided to punish her by falling off the wagon himself? 

Hope those side effects have worn off and you're feeling chipper, speedracer!

Conte was only interested in Lillian's money to finance his various schemes and projects.  By the time he met Roth it was established that she was a very famous star who probably most people knew had a drinking problem, so he cruelly used his "little policeman" analogy at the party to worm his way into her heart, and pocketbook.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is The Lost Weekend considered a film noir?  Is I’ll Cry Tomorrow?  Dan Birnam never left a glass until it was empty. Just left those  little shot glass condensation rings.  He never said, “Nat, I think I’ll go down the street to Delmonico’s and get me something to eat.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Thompson said:

Is The Lost Weekend considered a film noir?  Is I’ll Cry Tomorrow?  Dan Birnam never left a glass until it was empty. Just left those  little shot glass condensation rings.  He never said, “Nat, I think I’ll go down the street to Delmonico’s and get me something to eat.”

A good film is a good film and a mediocre one is a mediocre one. That's all that matters. All this trying to figure out whether or not a film classifies as noir is just so much hooey. This appears to be an obsession with some noir buffs.

Do other film genre fans spend so much time doing this? Do western fans sit around debating as to whether or not Treasure of the Sierra Madre or Lonely Are the Brave classify as true westerns?

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Do western fans sit around debating...

It's broken into good/bad western. Most "bad" have Dean Martin in them. 

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/27/2021 at 4:32 PM, Thompson said:

Well, this is exceptional news to me.  I have never heard of Act of Violence.  Robert Ryan is so intense, can’t wait to see him in this one.  I’m guessing right off that sentiment and girly stuff is at a minimum but he’s probably got that archetypical wife who is boss of the kitchen and maybe believable.  The plot sounds like something I wouldn’t like, so we shall see.  Probably the music will make the difference.  All these subliminal things make the difference.  And every facial expression - twitch of an eye, curl of a lip, the first drag from a newly lit cigarette.

Nope,  "sentiment and girly stuff" as you call it is front and centre,  at least at the beginning of the film.

Again,  not to labour a point,  but as I said earlier,  many noirs feature a happy domestic scene at the outset,  husband and wife kidding around, clearly showing they care about each other, often there's a child,  that kind of thing.  As I said,  it's to signal to the audience that this guy has a lot to lose if things go wrong for him. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Thompson said:

Is The Lost Weekend considered a film noir?  Is I’ll Cry Tomorrow?  Dan Birnam never left a glass until it was empty. Just left those  little shot glass condensation rings.  He never said, “Nat, I think I’ll go down the street to Delmonico’s and get me something to eat.”

Wow, you really pay attention to things like how much drinking and smoking is in a film, whether the characters actually finish the drinks,  whether they drink  / and or smoke/  with their right or their left hand,  etc.    While I would agree that the best noirs,  ( and often the most fun ones)  show plenty of drinking, smoking, and, er,   other vices, I don't use those things as a measure of how noirish the film is, or how much I like it.

( Maybe you don't either, and this isn't a criticism or anything, we all pay attention to different details in movies.  Just saying I've noticed you seem to keep a "drinks and smokes" count of sorts when talking about noir.  )

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

It's broken into good/bad western. Most "bad" have Dean Martin in them. 

LOL

You mean like maybe ones which might feature Dino singing a duet with Ricky Nelson?  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TomJH said:

A good film is a good film and a mediocre one is a mediocre one. That's all that matters. All this trying to figure out whether or not a film classifies as noir is just so much hooey. This appears to be an obsession with some noir buffs.

Do other film genre fans spend so much time doing this? Do western fans sit around debating as to whether or not Treasure of the Sierra Madre or Lonely Are the Brave classify as true westerns?

 

I know,  it sometimes seems as though some people are more interested in classifying a film  than actually watching and enjoying it.  (No offence to Thompson,  it appears as though he's just discovering this type of film, so maybe he's still figuring out his own idea of what "noir" is. )

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, misswonderly3 said:

I know,  it sometimes seems as though some people are more interested in classifying a film  than actually watching and enjoying it.

 

It sure seems that way, at least with some noir fans. The films I love are the films I love, no matter what their film genre classification may be. And, yes, some of them are noirs but I really don't care what box some may put them in. They're just damn good movies to me.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Dargo said:

LOL

You mean like maybe ones which might feature Dino singing a duet with Ricky Nelson?  

I would assume that Moe may find that particular Dean Martin western an exception to his "it's a bad western if Dean is in it" rule. (Even if Ricky Nelson is also in the film, an aspect I had always seen as the fly in the ointment of an otherwise pretty good oater).

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Dargo said:

LOL

You mean like maybe ones which might feature Dino singing a duet with Ricky Nelson?  

Look, I didn't say I agreed with them, it's just what they say! 

I like Rick Nelson and Dino. I was raised on that kind of cheese. War Wagon, Rio Bravo,  Five Card Stud, Bandolero!

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I would assume that Moe may find that particular Dean Martin western an exception to his "it's a bad western if Dean is in it" rule. (Even if Ricky Nelson is also in the film, an aspect I had always seen as the fly in the ointment of an otherwise pretty good oater).

For some reason I've never been particularly impressed with either Rio Bravo or what is pretty much its remake El Dorado, Tom. But yes, Dino is actually pretty good playing the drunkard in the former, and in fact might even be a little better than Mitchum was in virtually the same role in the latter.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...