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8 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The Man in Half Moon Street (1945), Decoy (1946), The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951), Invasion of The Body Snatchers (1956), Manchurian Candidate (The)(1962), Alphaville (1965), Seconds (1966), The Psychic Killer (1975), Blade Runner (1982), Delicatessen (1991), Dark City (1998).

Ah yes, i should've thought of Alphaville and Blade Runner.  Some of those i'll try to find.  thanks.

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12 hours ago, Dargo said:

Hi Shank Asu. In regards to my above Bruce Dern comment,  I'll now copy and paste an offering of mine in the recent "Great Hollywood Screen Psychopaths" thread which should explain it.

It's a story I once heard Dern himself tell on some talk show years ago, and which I found very amusing both then and to this day:

(...btw, welcome to the boards)

thanks, and thanks for re-sharing the post.  that's a funny quote.

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6 hours ago, Stallion said:

Yeah, Bruce Dern got the privilege of possible being the first to kill a John Wayne character in a movie, The Cowboys. In those years, imagine the villiany attached to Dern as he was tasked in violating the great John Wayne whose characters could never be killed. I have seen Dern talk about the experience and the comments to him from Wayne in how hated Dern would then likely be. I think Dern also mentioned Wayne wanting Dern to really rough up the Duke, but like mentioned above, my memory on that part is a bit fuzzy.

Actually Stallion and if we can stretch this point a bit, before Dern killed Wayne in The Cowboys, Big Duke had been killed "at the hands of another human being", an important distinction here, in a few  other films made  previously to this western.

In The Fighting Seabees (1944) and in Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), by a Japanese soldier. And, in The Alamo (1960), by a Mexican soldier and when Wayne played the historical figure Davy Crockett.

(...although admittedly, the differences here being that these are shown as a circumstance and consequence of war and performed by an unbilled character or movie extra, and not as cold blooded murder and which is how the credited in the film Dern dispatched the big guy by shooting him in the back)

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Actually Stallion and if we can stretch this point a bit, before Dern killed Wayne in The Cowboys, Big Duke had been killed "at the hands of another human being", an important distinction here, in a few  other films made  previously to this western.

In The Fighting Seabees (1944) and in Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), by a Japanese soldier. And, in The Alamo (1960), by a Mexican soldier and when Wayne played the historical figure Davy Crockett.

(...although admittedly, the differences here being that these are shown as a circumstance and consequence of war and performed by an unbilled character or movie extra, and not as cold blooded murder and which is how the credited in the film Dern dispatched the big guy by shooting him in the back)

 

 

And let's not forget the film in which the Duke was killed by a cephalapod.

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9 minutes ago, TomJH said:

And let's not forget the film in which the Duke was killed by a cephalapod.

Yep, in DeMille's Reap the Wild Wind.

(...but this is why my above post included the words, " "at the hands of another human being, an important distinction here")

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10 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yep, in DeMille's Reap the Wild Wind.

(...but this is why my above post included the words, " "at the hands of another human being, an important distinction here")

I just figured the giant squids of the word would want me to speak up for them. This may be the only film ever made in which one of them got a major film star.

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18 hours ago, TomJH said:

It's not just that Dern killed Wayne but how his character did it in the film.

Wayne's indestructible superman presence on the screen is very comforting for his fans. They didn't like being shocked and discomforted.

Yep. I watched a clip of that scene and Dern's character basically tortured Wayne's character.

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12 hours ago, Dargo said:

Actually Stallion and if we can stretch this point a bit, before Dern killed Wayne in The Cowboys, Big Duke had been killed "at the hands of another human being", an important distinction here, in a few  other films made  previously to this western.

In The Fighting Seabees (1944) and in Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), by a Japanese soldier. And, in The Alamo (1960), by a Mexican soldier and when Wayne played the historical figure Davy Crockett.

(...although admittedly, the differences here being that these are shown as a circumstance and consequence of war and performed by an unbilled character or movie extra, and not as cold blooded murder and which is how the credited in the film Dern dispatched the big guy by shooting him in the back)

 

 

And before shooting him in the back, "winged" him numerous times, just prolonging the suffering before killing him.

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32 minutes ago, Stallion said:

And before shooting him in the back, "winged" him numerous times, just prolonging the suffering before killing him.

It's a nasty scene and Dern is great in it. Maybe too great with all that hostile backlash that he received from Wayne fans.

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2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Coming up this weekend on Noir Alley:   "Possessed",  a classic Joan-o-drama.

And, yet another movie in which if the old saying, "Lucky in cards, unlucky in love" is true, would imply that Van Heflin must have been one hellava poker player.

(...well, in regards to so many of the characters he played in his career, anyway)

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On 6/5/2021 at 11:30 AM, misswonderly3 said:

Coming up this weekend on Noir Alley:   "Possessed",  a classic Joan-o-drama.

First time viewing for me and I loved it, 8/10. Crawford gives one of her best ever performances. Great direction too, it hooks you in right from the beginning with that haunting scene done on an actual location. Then we meet the dazed Crawford and the flashbacks start and away we go. It is a real gold standard of melodrama with it's incredible twists and turns. I also find it an excellent study of a disturbed mind.

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22 hours ago, Thompson said:

Just watched Gun Crazy on TCM.  That was a treat.  

I found it interesting as the female lead was definitely crazier than the male lead.

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On 6/5/2021 at 11:30 AM, misswonderly3 said:

Coming up this weekend on Noir Alley:   "Possessed",  a classic Joan-o-drama.

Right on target Miss W. This was totally a Joan Crawford vehicle.  I think "OBSESSED" would have been a more accurate title, but maybe that was already taken. It was somewhat entertaining and Ms. Crawford gave an excellent performance.  However, I wouldn't classify this film as noir. While  it's obvious Crawford's character is going to eventually kill someone, the only mystery is who.  The term melodrama fits perfectly. While I'm glad I watched, it's doubtful I'll sit through it again.  On my Film Noir one to ten scale, I give it a three. 

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23 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

Right on target Miss W. This was totally a Joan Crawford vehicle.  I think "OBSESSED" would have been a more accurate title, but maybe that was already taken. It was somewhat entertaining and Ms. Crawford gave an excellent performance.  However, I wouldn't classify this film as noir. While  it's obvious Crawford's character is going to eventually kill someone, the only mystery is who.  The term melodrama fits perfectly. While I'm glad I watched, it's doubtful I'll sit through it again.  On my Film Noir one to ten scale, I give it a three. 

That's exactly why I call it a "Joan-o-drama".  Joan Crawford specialized in that kind of role;   not that she always played a crazy person, but she did usually play a woman who was kind of over-the-top, emotionally. There are all kinds of movies with scenes of Joan widening her eyes,  clutching her hands to her head, etc.   And the storylines mainly were melodramas  (what used to be called "women's pictures".)  So, since that was her specialty, and since melodramas were the main kind of movie she was in,  I think they're kind of a genre on their own:  Joan-o-dramas.

ps;  to be fair,  Joan's not always a crazed over-emotional character. She also often plays a savvy businesswoman.  She's relatively normal in Mildred Pierce ,  a hard-working and enterprising business woman,  as she is in The Damned Don't Cry.  

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2 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

Right on target Miss W. This was totally a Joan Crawford vehicle.  I think "OBSESSED" would have been a more accurate title, but maybe that was already taken. It was somewhat entertaining and Ms. Crawford gave an excellent performance.  However, I wouldn't classify this film as noir. While  it's obvious Crawford's character is going to eventually kill someone, the only mystery is who.  The term melodrama fits perfectly. While I'm glad I watched, it's doubtful I'll sit through it again.  On my Film Noir one to ten scale, I give it a three. 

Crawford actually made a pre-Code picture called "Possessed", with Clark Gable, at MGM.  There are some accounts that she wanted the producers to change the title of this film because of that earlier production.

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I tell you what, Joan’s character frightened me.  Van should have picked up on how dangerous she was and stayed in Canada.  When Joan was at the piano concert I was surprised to see how attractive her shoulders were.  I’m pretty sure men judge women by their shoulders.

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8 minutes ago, Thompson said:

I tell you what, Joan’s character frightened me.  Van should have picked up on how dangerous she was and stayed in Canada.  When Joan was at the piano concert I was surprised to see how attractive her shoulders were.  I’m pretty sure men judge women by their shoulders.

Have you seen Humoresque (1946)?       Here is a photo where the design of the dress stresses those shoulders.

This is a first rate movie about music and  obsession.  

Humoresque (1946) - Rotten Tomatoes

 

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10 minutes ago, Thompson said:

I tell you what, Joan’s character frightened me.  Van should have picked up on how dangerous she was and stayed in Canada.  When Joan was at the piano concert I was surprised to see how attractive her shoulders were.  I’m pretty sure men judge women by their shoulders.

Maybe  that's why she often wore them padded- her shoulders, I mean - to draw attention to them.  Joan Crawford is definitely associated with that fashion from the '40s of padded shoulders.

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Right, and I hate that padded shoulder look, opposite of sexy or attractive.  I didn’t know Joan had such nice shoulders, so I’ve warmed to her a bit.  Give Joan a Chance is my new mantra.

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

Maybe  that's why she often wore them padded- her shoulders, I mean - to draw attention to them.  Joan Crawford is definitely associated with that fashion from the '40s of padded shoulders.

Actually the padded shoulders was a problem for Michael Curtiz as he was against her casting for Mildred Pierce complaining  iam paraphrasing  'she will be coming with her padded shoulders'

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Possessed is a movie that I actually own, but hadn't watched yet.  It came in a Joan Crawford box set that I have.  I really enjoyed it.  It was like a precursor to Fatal Attraction, minus the horrific bunny on the stove scene. 

Joan's character was bonkers, but also sympathetic.  Was she just that enamored with Van Heflin that she didn't want to take "no" for an answer? It seemed like the film tried to explain that Van's rejection of Joan triggered her psychosis, as if it were lying dormant, waiting to come out.  I wish we'd seen more of his relationship with Joan.  Did he lead her on only to reject her? Or was he just keeping things casual and she made the relationship more than it was? I know that he was the co-star of the film, so he couldn't do this, but I wish he'd stayed away from Joan.  Each time he re-surfaced, he re-ignited her obsession.  When he hooked up with Geraldine Brooks, I felt like he fully crossed into cad territory.  It was weird how she points out to him that they last met when she was 11, and then he's checking her out and wanting to go out with her.  But anyway, she was an adult, so I digress.  I think Geraldine was interested in him because he was an older man and had a bit of a mysterious aura around him.  With him though, I was thinking that he was perhaps a golddigger, and maybe liked the idea of having a young woman on his arm. Joan was a little long in the tooth for him if Geraldine is more his speed.

Anyway, I really liked this film.  I'm always a fan of the films that Joan made during the "woman in peril" part of her career and this film was no exception. 

Poor Joan is now seen as a "Mommie Dearest" caricature  with the big lips, the big eyebrows, the shoulder pads, all that.  But I think that Joan was actually a very attractive woman in the 1940s, more attractive than she was during her ingenue days. 

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