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35 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Yes, and with a social conscious, too, lol. 

You can't beat that, ha!

Perfect combo! :D I actually bought a copy on DVD, I love this film so much!

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So I'm driving and I have sports-talk radio on.   This is at a time I'm typically not driving (which is the only time I list to AM radio);    the host mentions:  this is our noir segment. 

Say what????    It appears this is a recurring part of their broadcast.    They go on to discuss The Naked Kiss,  mentioning director Sam Fuller,  the year it was made, 1964,  give a description of the movie (but make it clear they don't want to give away the story),  and play audio clips from the film.     I was in shock.    (as in Shock Corridor the Fuller film made before this one).  

This host has been on sport stations for years in So Cal,  but I had no idea he was into this.       Then they go on to another film;  The Longest Day.   They compare the film to Saving Private Ryan but go on to say,   well,  The Longest Day,  has Robert Mitchum,  storming that beachhead and what can be better than that.  

The Naked Kiss YIFY subtitles

 

   

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Maybe VanJones weren't gettin' it on. Perhaps Joan was rather delusional and figured a few kisses

and a hug showed that Van was in love with her. OTOH, maybe they were doing the nasty. Joan, being

a nurse, knew enough to keep herself out of trouble at least. Since Heflin character's was a bit of a 

nogoodnik, and Joan had mental problems, shooting and killing him didn't necessitate bringing on the

full wrath of the Code. If she had shot and killed Albert Schweitzer things might have gone differently for

her. 

 

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On 6/8/2021 at 9:19 AM, ElCid said:

Richard Boone was also in the remake of The Big Sleep (1978), a neo-noir reset to England.

In Dragnet 1954.

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

So I'm driving and I have sports-talk radio on.   This is at a time I'm typically not driving (which is the only time I list to AM radio);    the host mentions:  this is our noir segment. 

Say what????    It appears this is a recurring part of their broadcast.    They go on to discuss The Naked Kiss,  mentioning director Sam Fuller,  the year it was made, 1964,  give a description of the movie (but make it clear they don't want to give away the story),  and play audio clips from the film.     I was in shock.    (as in Shock Corridor the Fuller film made before this one).  

This host has been on sport stations for years in So Cal,  but I had no idea he was into this.       Then they go on to another film;  The Longest Day.   They compare the film to Saving Private Ryan but go on to say,   well,  The Longest Day,  has Robert Mitchum,  storming that beachhead and what can be better than that.  

The Naked Kiss YIFY subtitles

 

   

The Longest Day was an excellent movie with excellent acting.  While Day was fiction,  Saving Private Ryan was a totally unbelievable fictitious puff piece in my opinion.

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17 hours ago, Dargo said:

And don't forget those pickled ones in that jar over at the end of bar, Thompson.

(...you know, right over there on the end of the bar where those women you talk with about me usually sit!) 

;)

Dargo, what is wrong with you?  You eat pickled pigs feet and maybe a pickled pig lip at the bar, but nobody eats a pickled egg.  Even Sargent Carter doesn’t eat a pickled egg.  Sam Drucker had a pickle barrel and there were no eggs in it.  I know where the eggs are in far corner of the bar, but they are hard boiled, not pickled.

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2 hours ago, Thompson said:

Dargo, what is wrong with you?  You eat pickled pigs feet and maybe a pickled pig lip at the bar, but nobody eats a pickled egg.  Even Sargent Carter doesn’t eat a pickled egg.  Sam Drucker had a pickle barrel and there were no eggs in it.  I know where the eggs are in far corner of the bar, but they are hard boiled, not pickled.

No, they're both hard boiled AND pickled, dude!

Just ask Nick the bartender. He'll tell ya!

Its-A-Wonderful-Life%252B%2525286%252529

(...considering you spend so much time there, I'm sure he knows you from Adam's off ox, right?!)  ;)

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5 hours ago, ElCid said:

The Longest Day was an excellent movie with excellent acting.  While Day was fiction,  Saving Private Ryan was a totally unbelievable fictitious puff piece in my opinion.

Once past the bloody opening, which is what everyone remembers, Saving Private Ryan plays out like a conventional, even somewhat corny, 40s war film. It is suggested by the story of the Niland brothers, but filtered through Spielberg's fondness for old movies.

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1 hour ago, midwestan said:

"Frogs" was a totally awesome movie!  Haven't seen it in years.  👍🏻

Do any of the characters croak in it?

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18 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Although I think it falls under the heading of those "blaxploitation" movies of the 1970's....

Yes, a mix of genres and fails at all of them! :D

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2 hours ago, midwestan said:

"Frogs" was a totally awesome movie!  Haven't seen it in years.  👍🏻

I wish I'd seen this film!

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13 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Have you got FROGS?

No, I missed that one! Sadly, TCM didnt include these 2 films in their Milland SOTM tribute! :( I know it's been shown on tv.

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16 hours ago, kingrat said:

Once past the bloody opening, which is what everyone remembers, Saving Private Ryan plays out like a conventional, even somewhat corny, 40s war film. It is suggested by the story of the Niland brothers, but filtered through Spielberg's fondness for old movies.

The difference is that in Saving Private Ryan, the US military risked the lives and caused the deaths of some soldiers just to "rescue" one soldier because his brothers had been killed.  In addition, they pulled those soldiers away from their combat duties risking the lives of other soldiers as well as missions.  I seriously doubt anything such as this has ever taken place in wartime.  In the case of the Niland brothers, one was sent back to US.  No one risked their lives to "rescue" him.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niland_brothers

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On 6/10/2021 at 9:45 AM, LsDoorMat said:

There are several movies where I ask "How did that get past the code?" Like "Born To Kill". SPOILERS AHEAD.  You have promiscuity, divorce, gambling, murder, and a one-way unrequited gay relationship in the first fifteen minutes. Although the two main characters "get theirs" so to speak, what about that detective who spouts Bible verses while contemplating his next bribe? He is a most detestable person, perfectly willing to let somebody get away with murder as long as he gets paid, and yet the film ends with his moralizing.  And then there is the wealthy sister. Did she say what she said to Tierney's character just because she realized that he'd go into a homicidal rage against Trevor - he did! - just to get even for the fact that the guy never loved her?  She certainly did not "get hers" either. 

Back to "Possessed" - Maybe because they had to have Louise "sort of" get away with it - Not responsible for killing David because she is insane - the script had David painted as a most unsympathetic character. Just my take.  More than likely David dying saved Louise' stepdaughter from years of unhappiness, although I'm sure it would be awhile before she saw it that way. 

 

LsDoorMat,  thanks for such a considered response to my post.  I just want to address some of your observations about Born to Kill.

Your wondering  "how did that get past the code"  around some of those issues that come up in the film can partly be answered by the fact that film makers, (whether director or writer )  were fully aware of the code, and became adept at finding ways to get around it.  They did this mostly by implying  activities that were banned by the censors,  rather than directly showing them.  Promiscuity?  who knows for sure?  They could always argue that the couple are just having a nice late night drink together after a date.  Who says the man is going to stay the night?  Implied, but the censors can't say for sure,  plus, a lot of the time I suspect the censors who implemented the Code were too naive or too dumb to recognize such tricks.

Gay relationship?  Implied - not spelt out.  Even the double bed thing could be simply a result of what was available in the rental building. I've seen lots of old movies where two people of the same sex are sharing a bed, but it's often because of economic  necessity, not mutual desire.  I do agree that it's clearly insinuated that the Elisha Cook Jr.  character has a "thing"  for Lawrence Tierney's,  but the Code can't prove anything, and as I said, I suspect that often the censor officials viewing such films were too dumb   or  unsophisticated  to recognize such covert signals the director may have been sending.

As for the "detective who spouts Bible verses",  there's nothing in the Code that says an unpleasant or even amoral character will get punished; if that were the case,  classic Hollywood films would be littered with predictable endings showing dislikable people getting their "just desserts". Iam not an expert on the details of that Hollywood Code,  (some here are, however),  but I'm fairly sure that it was mainly murderers who had to be brought to justice.  True,  behaviour involving sex,  pre-marital pregnancy,  homosexuality, -anything like that - was not allowed to be shown. But as I said, a clever filmmaker had ways to get these things across without overtly showing them.

I quite like that sleazy detective  ( the actor playing him named, appropriately, Walter Slezak ).  He's one of the most entertaining characters in the movie.  And think how boring all these old films we love would be if everyone who was unethical was punished or worse, not even allowed to be shown.  It's the "bad" people who make them fun !    

...I know you weren't arguing that films should not feature villains, perhaps you were just surprised that sometimes they seemed to be allowed to be celebrated ?

edit:   you say  " and yet the film ends with his moralizing", which just reminded me, the last time I saw Born to Kill I saw the detective as a sort of Greek Chorus character.

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Van is accused of murder in 1954's BLACK WIDOW.   

Peggy Ann Garner as you've never seen her!

Ginger Rogers is terrific  No one ever mentions this performance as one of her best (alongside STAGE DOOR in my opinion)

Poor Gene Tierney....she was going through some personal mental health issues and unfortunately it shows

George Raft trying to stay awake

Reginald Gardner,  that British bundle of charisma

Virginia Leith,  not remembered for anything except her unforgettable performance in THE BRAIN THAT WOULDN'T DIE

 

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Van is accused of murder in 1954's BLACK WIDOW.   

Peggy Ann Garner as you've never seen her!

Ginger Rogers is terrific  No one ever mentions this performance as one of her best (alongside STAGE DOOR in my opinion)

Poor Gene Tierney....she was going through some personal mental health issues and unfortunately it shows

George Raft trying to stay awake

Reginald Gardner,  that British bundle of charisma

Virginia Leith,  not remembered for anything except her unforgettable performance in THE BRAIN THAT WOULDN'T DIE

 

I like BLACK WIDOW a lot.  

I'm glad I'm not the only one who thought Ginger Rogers was great as  Carlotta in this movie.  The Leonard Maltin review of BLACK WIDOW that used to appear on the TCM site called this a "poor"  performance. No, it was quite good. It  was fun to see Ginger Rogers (I'm a huge fan) in a b****y role 

Mabel Albertson (Darrin's mother on BEWITCHED who frequently got "sick headaches" when caught the witchcraft cross fire) had a  small role as in a flashback sequence).

I admit that I do enjoy THE BRAIN THAT WOULDN'T DIE. 

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Van is accused of murder in 1954's BLACK WIDOW.   

Peggy Ann Garner as you've never seen her!

Ginger Rogers is terrific  No one ever mentions this performance as one of her best (alongside STAGE DOOR in my opinion)

Poor Gene Tierney....she was going through some personal mental health issues and unfortunately it shows

George Raft trying to stay awake

Reginald Gardner,  that British bundle of charisma

Virginia Leith,  not remembered for anything except her unforgettable performance in THE BRAIN THAT WOULDN'T DIE

 

I remember Virginia Leith as William Holden's leading lady (is that term still acceptable?) in 1956's Toward the Unknown.  She was quite good, actually.

I do agree with Maltin that Black Widow is a dull mystery, and that Rogers and Raft give "remarkably poor performances."  But then again, the script gave them nothing to work with.

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Virginia Leith,  not remembered for anything except her unforgettable performance in THE BRAIN THAT WOULDN'T DIE

 

31 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

I remember Virginia Leith as William Holden's leading lady (is that term still acceptable?) in 1956's Toward the Unknown.  She was quite good, actually.

And I also remember her in A Kiss Before Dying (1956).

(...and I'm sure you guys do too, actually)

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5 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

LsDoorMat,  thanks for such a considered response to my post.  I just want to address some of your observations about Born to Kill.

Your wondering  "how did that get past the code"  around some of those issues that come up in the film can partly be answered by the fact that film makers, (whether director or writer )  were fully aware of the code, and became adept at finding ways to get around it.  They did this mostly by implying  activities that were banned by the censors,  rather than directly showing them.  Promiscuity?  who knows for sure?  They could always argue that the couple are just having a nice late night drink together after a date.  Who says the man is going to stay the night?  Implied, but the censors can't say for sure,  plus, a lot of the time I suspect the censors who implemented the Code were too naive or too dumb to recognize such tricks.

Gay relationship?  Implied - not spelt out.  Even the double bed thing could be simply a result of what was available in the rental building. I've seen lots of old movies where two people of the same sex are sharing a bed, but it's often because of economic  necessity, not mutual desire. 

Christmas Holiday (1947)

Two women dancing together in a New Orleans brothel.

Vk3BTf9.png

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5 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

They did this mostly by implying  activities that were banned by the censors,  rather than directly showing them.

There's always the old "it was all a dream" device. 

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15 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Christmas Holiday (1947)

Two women dancing together in a New Orleans brothel.

Vk3BTf9.png

Not sure two women dancing together implies anything.  Women and girls dancing together is (or was) fairly common in movies, TV shows and real life.  They wanted to dance and the men didn't.

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