Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, ElCid said:

Not sure two women dancing together implies anything.  Women and girls dancing together is (or was) fairly common in movies, TV shows and real life.  They wanted to dance and the men didn't.

And that is the beauty of coded images and lines under the MPPC, you, the viewer can read it as twisted and freaky as  your imagination will take it, and no one can say you are wrong and their interpretation is right. 😎

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ElCid said:

Not sure two women dancing together implies anything.  Women and girls dancing together is (or was) fairly common in movies, TV shows and real life.  They wanted to dance and the men didn't.

Don't kid yourself Hollywood was just as twisted and freaky back then as it is now, We just never heard about most of the scandals with the big studios covering everything up.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

I like BLACK WIDOW a lot.  

I'm glad I'm not the only one who thought Ginger Rogers was great as  Carlotta in this movie.  The Leonard Maltin review of BLACK WIDOW that used to appear on the TCM site called this a "poor"  performance. No, it was quite good. It  was fun to see Ginger Rogers (I'm a huge fan) in a b****y role 

Mabel Albertson (Darrin's mother on BEWITCHED who frequently got "sick headaches" when caught the witchcraft cross fire) had a  small role as in a flashback sequence).

I admit that I do enjoy THE BRAIN THAT WOULDN'T DIE. 

Thanks so much, Holden.  I thought I was alone in my appreciation of Ginger's performance.   I think a lot of people overlook Rogers as a serious actress; she was underrated most of the time!  

Ah yes, Mabel Albertson!   She's owner of that Greenwich Village restaurant where Peggy Ann gets a waitressing job.  I always thought it strange, though, that Alberton plays her part as if she were running a brothel, lol.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

I remember Virginia Leith as William Holden's leading lady (is that term still acceptable?) in 1956's Toward the Unknown.  She was quite good, actually.

I do agree with Maltin that Black Widow is a dull mystery, and that Rogers and Raft give "remarkably poor performances."  But then again, the script gave them nothing to work with.

That's a new one for me, TOWARD THE UNKNOWN.  I'll have to check it out!

I always have to watch BLACK WIDOW whenever it comes on, even though I do agree with you on the overall dullness which for me is not so much a matter of the script as it is slack direction and the usual 1950's stultifying, artificial Cinemascope, widescreen "look", which flattens everything out, lol.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Could barely get through WALK A CROOKED MILE.    Hey, Eddie, "No, not noir".   Just a mediocre '50's crime drama.   Dennis O'Keefe, as I think I've said before on these boards, makes my skin crawl.  Don't ask me why.  (I tolerate him in THE LEOPARD MAN only because I'm a Lewton fan)  

All I can say is thank God for Louis Hayward who imparts a classy British Simon Templar-ish patina over the whole dreary affair. 

I've never found Louise Albritton good in anything but SON OF DRACULA.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Walk a Crooked Mile is one I'd never seen before, so that alone was a bonus for me.   I understand why Eddie thought it was noir enough for Noir Alley:  the visuals were quite noirish, lots of dark urban streets,  criss-crossing shadows,  etc. 

I do think it was a bit too long.   SPOILERS    By the time the guys figured out it was NOT  the  handerchief-carrying woman and her Austrian lover,  I'd kind of had enough.  I'd kept  thinking it was that white-haired professor type,  the one they kept coming back to.  He just seemed like he was putting on an act,  plus, usually the secret bad guy is someone we've been seeing all along.  The actual spy was someone we only saw once,  in that bit where they were observing all the super scientists through that 2-way mirror.     Oh well,  not really worth trying to figure it all out.

I agree with Bronxgirl, the Scotland Yard guy did add a "classy Simon Templar-ish patina" to the film.  He reminded of a slightly rougher-looking Dirk Bogarde.

The most noble and admirable character in Walk a Crooked Mile  was that European landlady.  She saved the day !  I don't think Grayson and O'Hara  gave her enough credit.  She saved their lives at the expense of her own.   And were those two really going to just passively allow themselves to be shot by Raymond Burr's Commie spy character?   

My favourite of the  "Watch out for Commie Spies"  sub-genre has got to be Pickup on South Street.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Walk a Crooked Mile is one I'd never seen before, so that alone was a bonus for me.   I understand why Eddie thought it was noir enough for Noir Alley:  the visuals were quite noirish, lots of dark urban streets,  criss-crossing shadows,  etc. 

I do think it was a bit too long.   SPOILERS    By the time the guys figured out it was NOT  the  handerchief-carrying woman and her Austrian lover,  I'd kind of had enough.  I'd kept  thinking it was that white-haired professor type,  the one they kept coming back to.  He just seemed like he was putting on an act,  plus, usually the secret bad guy is someone we've been seeing all along.  The actual spy was someone we only saw once,  in that bit where they were observing all the super scientists through that 2-way mirror.     Oh well,  not really worth trying to figure it all out.

I agree with Bronxgirl, the Scotland Yard guy did add a "classy Simon Templar-ish patina" to the film.  He reminded of a slightly rougher-looking Dirk Bogarde.

The most noble and admirable character in Walk a Crooked Mile  was that European landlady.  She saved the day !  I don't think Grayson and O'Hara  gave her enough credit.  She saved their lives at the expense of her own.   And were those two really going to just passively allow themselves to be shot by Raymond Burr's Commie spy character?   

My favourite of the  "Watch out for Commie Spies"  sub-genre has got to be Pickup on South Street.

I agree. The narration reminded me of the old Untouchables TV show narrated by Walter Winchell.  I liked that part, but the rest was mediocre. I hope these last few Noir Alley presentations aren't indicative that Eddie has run out of noirs.  As discussed before my definition of film noir is narrower than most on this site.  Having said that I'm willing to broaden my perspective if it keeps Noir Alley alive.  

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Walk a Crooked Mile is one I'd never seen before, so that alone was a bonus for me.   I understand why Eddie thought it was noir enough for Noir Alley:  the visuals were quite noirish, lots of dark urban streets,  criss-crossing shadows,  etc. 

I do think it was a bit too long.   SPOILERS    By the time the guys figured out it was NOT  the  handerchief-carrying woman and her Austrian lover,  I'd kind of had enough.  I'd kept  thinking it was that white-haired professor type,  the one they kept coming back to.  He just seemed like he was putting on an act,  plus, usually the secret bad guy is someone we've been seeing all along.  The actual spy was someone we only saw once,  in that bit where they were observing all the super scientists through that 2-way mirror.     Oh well,  not really worth trying to figure it all out.

I agree with Bronxgirl, the Scotland Yard guy did add a "classy Simon Templar-ish patina" to the film.  He reminded of a slightly rougher-looking Dirk Bogarde.

The most noble and admirable character in Walk a Crooked Mile  was that European landlady.  She saved the day !  I don't think Grayson and O'Hara  gave her enough credit.  She saved their lives at the expense of her own.   And were those two really going to just passively allow themselves to be shot by Raymond Burr's Commie spy character?   

My favourite of the  "Watch out for Commie Spies"  sub-genre has got to be Pickup on South Street.

There was enough chit-chat about it this morning to get #NoirAlley trending on Twitter for a short while...

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

There was enough chit-chat about it this morning to get #NoirAlley trending on Twitter for a short while...

txfilmfan, you've brought up a sore point.  It always bothers me when Eddie Muller, at the end of his Noir Alley  "outro" ,  invites viewers to comment  on either Twitter or Facebook.

I don't "do"  Twitter or Facebook, and don't intend to.  It definitely feels like a slight to those of us who like to post our ideas about movies on this forum,  which after all is the home discussion page for Turner Classic Movies, and Eddie's program is part of Turner Classic Movies.  He never even mentions this forum's existence.

And yet,  I suspect that the noir fans who do choose to discuss Noir Alley here,   as opposed to Twitter or Facebook, know their movies better, and go into more depth in the conversations about the films than T. or F.  

Switching gears:   did anyone notice that Eddie mentioned that Dennis O'Keefe had transitioned from light comedies and musicals in his earlier career to more serious, darker work?  And that he compared that career switch to that of Dana Andrews?   Was that a mistake?  Did he mean Dick Powell?

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

tx   did anyone notice that Eddie mentioned that Dennis O'Keefe had transitioned from light comedies and musicals in his earlier career to more serious, darker work?  And that he compared that career switch to that of Dana Andrews?   Was that a mistake?  Did he mean Dick Powell?

No . O'keefe was not a song and dance man he did everything else.Dana did several musicals in the mid-late  40's but not many, he was doing Noirf ilms at the same time.Nobody ever made such a drastic change as Dick Powell ,who turned to be a good director and an important tv producer.

Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Switching gears:   did anyone notice that Eddie mentioned that Dennis O'Keefe had transitioned from light comedies and musicals in his earlier career to more serious, darker work?  And that he compared that career switch to that of Dana Andrews?   Was that a mistake?  Did he mean Dick Powell?

Yea,  I noticed that and I found it odd.    OK,  so Dana Andrews did State Fair after Laura and before Fallen Angel but a review of his pre-Laura films doesn't include many light comedies (e.g. Ball of Fire,  but his character is a gangster in this) and musicals!     Dennis O'Keefe was in a lot of light comedies and musicals before he started doing crime\noir roles after the war.     Thus I hope Eddie just made a mistake and said Andrews instead of Dick Powell (even if I find a comparison between Powell and O'Keefe to be kind of lame since Powell was a much bigger star when he made his career change).

  

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

txfilmfan, you've brought up a sore point.  It always bothers me when Eddie Muller, at the end of his Noir Alley  "outro" ,  invites viewers to comment  on either Twitter or Facebook.

I don't "do"  Twitter or Facebook, and don't intend to.  It definitely feels like a slight to those of us who like to post our ideas about movies on this forum,  which after all is the home discussion page for Turner Classic Movies, and Eddie's program is part of Turner Classic Movies.  He never even mentions this forum's existence.

And yet,  I suspect that the noir fans who do choose to discuss Noir Alley here,   as opposed to Twitter or Facebook, know their movies better, and go into more depth in the conversations about the films than T. or F.  

Switching gears:   did anyone notice that Eddie mentioned that Dennis O'Keefe had transitioned from light comedies and musicals in his earlier career to more serious, darker work?  And that he compared that career switch to that of Dana Andrews?   Was that a mistake?  Did he mean Dick Powell?

MissW, it always bothers me too, when Eddie never mentions TCM's site to discuss noirs. I've never been on facebook or twitter either and have no intention of ever going there. I do remember Eddie showing up on the bds. some years back, but cavegirl in many posts, bad mouthed Eddie so badly and then he never came back to the bds. I truly wish she/he hadn't done that character assassination of Eddie, that must be why he never returned.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

What got my mouth hanging open was when Eddie described O'Keefe as "charming" in his pre-noir roles.

Please.

Hey , Bronxgirl !  Apropos of our earlier conversation here re.  men who are or are not attractive,  what d'ya think of Joel McCrea ?  I know he wasn't in any noirs to speak of  (unless you count Foreign Correspondent,  but that's  a stretch),  but he was a cutie !   I think so, anyway.  He had a nice face, and a very charming way about him.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

txfilmfan, you've brought up a sore point.  It always bothers me when Eddie Muller, at the end of his Noir Alley  "outro" ,  invites viewers to comment  on either Twitter or Facebook.

I don't "do"  Twitter or Facebook, and don't intend to.  It definitely feels like a slight to those of us who like to post our ideas about movies on this forum,  which after all is the home discussion page for Turner Classic Movies, and Eddie's program is part of Turner Classic Movies.  He never even mentions this forum's existence.

And yet,  I suspect that the noir fans who do choose to discuss Noir Alley here,   as opposed to Twitter or Facebook, know their movies better, and go into more depth in the conversations about the films than T. or F.  

Switching gears:   did anyone notice that Eddie mentioned that Dennis O'Keefe had transitioned from light comedies and musicals in his earlier career to more serious, darker work?  And that he compared that career switch to that of Dana Andrews?   Was that a mistake?  Did he mean Dick Powell?

This bothers me as well.  I expect it may be because Eddie's Film Noir Foundation is on Twitter and Facebook.

Although I don't believe any TCM hosts ever mention this forum.

  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed Walk a Crooked Mile, but not enough that I would purchase the DVD or watch it again anytime soon.  I first became somewhat of a fan of Dennis O'Keefe when I saw Cover Up.

One movie Eddie mentioned was Kansas City Confidential which is a very good movie with lots of good character actors.  But that is another movie.  Next week's The Blue Gardenia is one worth watching if you have not seen it.

Every time I seen Raymond Burr in one of his many roles as a heavy, I am amazed that he ever got cast as Perry Mason for TV.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Walk a Crooked Mile. What a great title for a J. Edgar Hoover biopic. I get a kick out of the over the

top let's expose these red rats flicks of the 1940s and 1950s. Some are truly hilarious, especially in

hindsight. This one was okay, nothing very out of the usual run of these films, but entertaining enough

with some good action sequences. The chummy relationship between O'Keefe and Hayward was a

bonus, though they didn't seem to stray too far into gay subtext territory. They didn't even sleep in the

same bed. That's a deal killer. O'Keefe is okay looking, but to me he always seems kind of sneaky, even when

he's playing a good guy. Raymond Burr looks pretty good in a goatee, even if, in matters avoirdupois, he's

no V. Lenin. He did remind me of some of the beatnik characters who would sometimes show up on

Perry Mason and were usually not of sterling character. All in all, I'd give this one a C+. I haven't been

on twitter in a while. I used to post tweets about the imaginary XXX rated lascivious adventures of old time

Hollywood stars, but even that got tiring after a while. I will say this for twitter--they don't censor your

content like certain other places on the net do. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Switching gears:   did anyone notice that Eddie mentioned that Dennis O'Keefe had transitioned from light comedies and musicals in his earlier career to more serious, darker work?  And that he compared that career switch to that of Dana Andrews?   Was that a mistake?  Did he mean Dick Powell?

He may have meant Dick Powell but he also may have been thinking of John Payne who, arguably, was a bit more like Dana Andrews than was Powell.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

txfilmfan, you've brought up a sore point.  It always bothers me when Eddie Muller, at the end of his Noir Alley  "outro" ,  invites viewers to comment  on either Twitter or Facebook.

I don't "do"  Twitter or Facebook, and don't intend to.  It definitely feels like a slight to those of us who like to post our ideas about movies on this forum,  which after all is the home discussion page for Turner Classic Movies, and Eddie's program is part of Turner Classic Movies.  He never even mentions this forum's existence.

And yet,  I suspect that the noir fans who do choose to discuss Noir Alley here,   as opposed to Twitter or Facebook, know their movies better, and go into more depth in the conversations about the films than T. or F.   . . .

 

3 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

MissW, it always bothers me too, when Eddie never mentions TCM's site to discuss noirs. I've never been on facebook or twitter either and have no intention of ever going there. I do remember Eddie showing up on the bds. some years back, but cavegirl in many posts, bad mouthed Eddie so badly and then he never came back to the bds. I truly wish she/he hadn't done that character assassination of Eddie, that must be why he never returned.

 

2 hours ago, ElCid said:

This bothers me as well.  I expect it may be because Eddie's Film Noir Foundation is on Twitter and Facebook.

Although I don't believe any TCM hosts ever mention this forum.

I have to agree: I wish Eddie Muller would direct more people to these forums.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

xfilmfan, you've brought up a sore point.  It always bothers me when Eddie Muller, at the end of his Noir Alley  "outro" ,  invites viewers to comment  on either Twitter or Facebook.

I'm surprised no one has mentioned it earlier. But, do you really want this place to turn into the sewer Twitter or Facebook is? 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

I'm surprised no one has mentioned it earlier. But, do you really want this place to turn into the sewer Twitter or Facebook is? 

Good point - we are close enough already.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Hey , Bronxgirl !  Apropos of our earlier conversation here re.  men who are or are not attractive,  what d'ya think of Joel McCrea ?  I know he wasn't in any noirs to speak of  (unless you count Foreign Correspondent,  but that's  a stretch),  but he was a cutie !   I think so, anyway.  He had a nice face, and a very charming way about him.  

I was actually thinking of Joel the other day!  Attractive, definitely!  Was at ease  and more than competent in every genre -- thrillers (THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME), romantic comedy, westerns, straight melodrama, etc.)  Underrated.   For me McCrea is not so much cute or charming as -- solid, perhaps?  Rugged even.   And, like Randolph Scott, got better looking with age.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I was actually thinking of Joel the other day!  Attractive, definitely!  Was at ease  and more than competent in every genre -- thrillers (THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME), romantic comedy, westerns, straight melodrama, etc.)  Underrated.   For me McCrea is not so much cute or charming as -- solid, perhaps?  Rugged even.   And, like Randolph Scott, got better looking with age.

McCrea ended the final years of his career, like Scott, strictly in westerns. McCrea's were largely competent affairs but little more. No classics.

That does not apply, of course, to the one film these two actors made together, Ride the High Country, under Sam Peckinpah's direction. A fine spare western, with McCrea and Scott both bringing dignity to their roles. McCrea has a great line ("All I want is to enter my house  justified"), a perfect encapsulation of the philosophy of a morally decent man who could say he felt he did the right thing. McCrea would bring that same seasoned decency of character to his final film, a little known western called Mustang Country.

RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY - NowPlayingNashville.com

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, ElCid said:

I enjoyed Walk a Crooked Mile, but not enough that I would purchase the DVD or watch it again anytime soon.  I first became somewhat of a fan of Dennis O'Keefe when I saw Cover Up.

One movie Eddie mentioned was Kansas City Confidential which is a very good movie with lots of good character actors.  But that is another movie.  Next week's The Blue Gardenia is one worth watching if you have not seen it.

Every time I seen Raymond Burr in one of his many roles as a heavy, I am amazed that he ever got cast as Perry Mason for TV.

I liked it too! Very suspenseful and it kept me guessing....(Walk a Crooked Mile).

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

I'm surprised no one has mentioned it earlier. But, do you really want this place to turn into the sewer Twitter or Facebook is? 

Right. We don't need more deadbeats here!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...