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13 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Ok, it might be time for me to retire from posting here. This is the second week in a row I've made an idiotic and totally preventable mistake, mixing up two different actors. (Last week, it was Elisha Cook Jr., who I mindlessly exchanged for Elijah Wood ! Although maybe because I was unconsciously thinking there's something kind of hobbit-like about Elisha?)

Yes, Helen, of course it was Robert Young, NOT Robert Montgomery. In my defense, I have always gotten those two Roberts mixed up. I actually really do think they kind of look alike- well, maybe not so much in Crossfire, where Robert Young has taken on a kind of older -man Marcus Welby look.

Image result for marcus welby

"Some of my favourite patients are Jewish. Or even gay."

But check these two Roberts out:

Related image

R. Young

Related image

R. Montgomery

I mean, look at their hair, for one thing !

Anyway, Helen, thanks for the correction. I really must pay more attention to proof-reading my posts before I hit "submit".

I knew that you know the difference. Just messing with you. ?

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23 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Is that the real poster, though? It looks like a bit of a joke to me. On the lower left side, copy like "No, it's napalm ! No, it's nitro! No, it's ....it's...uh..."  seems a bit knowing and smartazz for the times. And did they have posters for radio dramas? I didn't know that. But if you say so, because I know you're kind of interested in old radio dramas, more so even than most people here, so I guess you'd know.

Something I want to say about "Crossfire":  Everyone praises it so, but it's not one of my favourite noirs, or even favourite "message movies" ( I like the way Eddie says it's a bit of of both - it is.) It has a tepid, hesitant feel to me. Maybe it's just that I usually love the worlds I see in old noirs, but the world of these kind of bored, malaise-ridden soldiers seems somewhat dull and depressing to me. I do "get" that that's very likely the way it was then for a not-so-brave new post-World War ll world, that the soldiers returning from the war felt lost and directionless, not to mention probably unappreciated. But for some reason, realistic though this depiction of all those recently-discharged G.I.'s probably is, it doesn't engage me. 

I do enjoy the three Roberts, though. I've always especially loved both Mitchum and Ryan, and think they're both great in Crossfire. Plus, it's got Gloria Grahame, although it's kind of strange, what exactly she's doing in this film. In fact, that whole story about the feckless Mitch and his encounter with Gloria's bored cynical taxi dancer seems like it's out of another movie. And what's up with the "Man" (that's how he's listed in the credits, I think) who shows up at Gloria's apartment and completely messes with Mitch? Not to mention that scene later on, when the detective and Mitch's wife are asking Gloria for testimony that would free Mitch, the "Man" (husband, boy-friend, stalker??) comes out all of a sudden,  speaks to the cop, and suddenly Gloria's screaming that she "hates his guts" !? What's up with that? there's a whole other movie going on there.

One other thing I always think of when I watch "Crossfire" (which I've seen about 4 times now, so I guess I don't dislike it that much after all): Wouldn't it have been interesting if they could have stuck to the original story and made the Sam Levene character gay? And I think the film makers tried to retain some of that, in a way. There's kind of a gay vibe about Mitch (although the actor, George Cooper, apparently was not gay), and it's easy to imagine some kind of scenario where Samuels invites him up to his apartment, but maybe without the young lady tagging along. Of course, as Eddie points out, they simply couldn't make a movie back in 1947 that acknowledged that a whole sub-culture like gay people existed.

And anyway, the point of "Crossfire", as Robert Montgomery's  -edit: I mean Robert Young's -character illustrates in his speech to the naive Leroy, is that some people conceive a hatred inside of them for anyone who's different, whether they're Jewish, Irish, black, brown, or gay. And you have to resist such people  (although possibly not by shooting them down in the street, as Tom notes.)

 

 

Yes, the way Levene asks them up to his apartment, there's some gay subtext there, for those who were that aware at the time (doubt many)......seems like a pick up.

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I'm her husband, but I couldn't get in the service. I had a flat foot. One flat

foot, one non-flat foot. Hurt like heck. After that happened, she wasn't interested

in me anymore...I'm not really her husband, pal. I saw her one night at the dance

joint and couldn't help myself. So I come up to her apartment every week, but she

wouldn't give me a tumble. She likes to go out with other fellas. That's okay. Sooner

and later she'll come back to me...That's really not the truth, buddy. I was very poor

as a kid. My parents didn't have enough dough for food, not to mention dance lessons,

so I go to the dance place and watch her to try to learn to dance for nothing. Then I

stated coming up here to mess us her coffee maker once a week. That really made her

mad...Okay, who am I fooling pal. Ever since I was a little boy I felt that I was really a

woman trapped inside a man's body. So I come up here, slip her five and she shows

me how to walk like a woman and get used to all those little female doodads.  You

know guy, you're not bad looking. Come back in a couple of years and maybe we'll

see what happens...But to be perfectly honest with you...

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15 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I'm her husband, but I couldn't get in the service. I had a flat foot. One flat

foot, one non-flat foot. Hurt like heck. After that happened, she wasn't interested

in me anymore...I'm not really her husband, pal. I saw her one night at the dance

joint and couldn't help myself. So I come up to her apartment every week, but she

wouldn't give me a tumble. She likes to go out with other fellas. That's okay. Sooner

and later she'll come back to me...That's really not the truth, buddy. I was very poor

as a kid. My parents didn't have enough dough for food, not to mention dance lessons,

so I go to the dance place and watch her to try to learn to dance for nothing. Then I

stated coming up here to mess us her coffee maker once a week. That really made her

mad...Okay, who am I fooling pal. Ever since I was a little boy I felt that I was really a

woman trapped inside a man's body. So I come up here, slip her five and she shows

me how to walk like a woman and get used to all those little female doodads.  You

know guy, you're not bad looking. Come back in a couple of years and maybe we'll

see what happens...But to be perfectly honest with you...

Were I a wealthy man, I would cut you a $10,000 advance on the spot for your CROSSFIRE update/ slash fic. 

FASCINATING. 

Ps- If one was going to take lessons on how to really BE a woman, there is no better sensei than Gloria Grahame. Sit down grasshopper, you have much to learn.

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Were I a wealthy man, I would cut you a $10,000 advance on the spot for your CROSSFIRE update/ slash fic. 

FASCINATING. 

Ps- If one was going to take lessons on how to really BE a woman, there is no better sensei than Gloria Grahame. Sit down grasshopper, you have much to learn.

In a movie about a multiple murderer psychopath, the "man" is the strangest character

in the whole thing. The actor who played him is one of those character actors you

recognize even though you might not be sure of their names, Paul Kelly in this case.

Kelly had his own troubles with the man, as he spent some time in the clink on a

manslaughter charge.

Gloria is her usual sexy self, though somewhat on the hard edged side. Not surprising,

considering her occupation and environment. 

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15 minutes ago, mr6666 said:

Eddie MullerVerified account @EddieMuller 16h16 hours ago

 
 

ASKING A FAVOR of the diehard noir fans: this week's feature on @NoirAlley has a few surprises that come out of left field.

PLEASE don't spoil the fun by tipping viewers off in advance! Don't be a SPOILER. I'm asking nice ... @TCM_Party @tcm @noirfoundation

 

It's a cookbook! :o

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On 3/20/2018 at 5:49 PM, LawrenceA said:

It's a cookbook! :o

PS- IF YOU HAVE THE TIME, what is this from? i've seen it parodied numerous times and there was actually one occasion where i harassed a friend by waving a book and shouting this as people walked by.

it's an old tv episode with Lloyd Bochner yes...or no?

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6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

PS- IF YOU HAVE THE TIME, what is this from? i've seen it parodied numerous times and there was actually one occasion where i harassed a friend by waving a book and shouting this as people walked by.

it's an old tv episode with Lloyd Bochner yes...or no?

Yep, it's from the Twilight Zone episode "To Serve Man", featuring Lloyd Bochner, Susan Cummings, and Richard "Jaws" Kiel as an alien.

hqdefault.jpg

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3 minutes ago, Fedya said:

I'm looking forward to next Sunday's movie in the Noir Alley slot: The Bible: In the Beginning.

It does feature a brooding Michael Parks getting into all kinds of trouble thanks to some rule-breaking dame. And Ava Gardner shows up later.

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On 3/18/2018 at 9:55 PM, misswonderly3 said:

Ok, it might be time for me to retire from posting here. This is the second week in a row I've made an idiotic and totally preventable mistake, mixing up two different actors. (Last week, it was Elisha Cook Jr., who I mindlessly exchanged for Elijah Wood ! Although maybe because I was unconsciously thinking there's something kind of hobbit-like about Elisha?)

Yes, Helen, of course it was Robert Young, NOT Robert Montgomery. In my defense, I have always gotten those two Roberts mixed up. I actually really do think they kind of look alike- well, maybe not so much in Crossfire, where Robert Young has taken on a kind of older -man Marcus Welby look.

I didn't even know that Elizabeth Montgomery's dad was a famous actor or that Robert Young had a movie career prior to television until TCM came on the air. So don't feel so bad. Also, I know somebody who can't tell James Dunn and Robert Montgomery apart. That I don't get.

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

FYI, it’s not a major major twist, but it is a rather surprising twist that happens at the half hour mark of NO QUESTIONS ASKED, Although from that point on the film really ratchets up the pacing and suspense. I liked it a lot.

Men! They are always stupid about women, but only in the movies do they learn their lesson! Yes this was a noir I don't recall seeing before and it had some great plot points. A crime boss who aspires to be able to hold his breath underwater for a record period of time? I won't talk about the plot point that people seem to think is a spoiler, but Joe Breen must have been busy cleaning out his office and getting ready to retire when this script came in for censorship approval. Then there is the reason that Arlene Dahl married the other guy in the first place - he was rich. If so then why??....I won't say, but I assume you know the final twist I am talking about. I never heard an explanation that made sense.

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I haven't had a chance to post about "No Questions Asked" til now. I had something else to do today, but I still managed to watch it. I'm so glad I did !

When you've seen a ton of noirs, as I have ( along with most of those who post on this thread, I'm sure), it's a real treat to catch one you haven't already seen.  Not only had I never seen this great little noir, I'd never even heard of it. And boy, was it fun ! Loved every minute of it.

SPOILER   SPOILER SPOILER

I don't know where to begin. First, I guess I will say that I saw the "twist" - if it's what I think Eddie meant by a "twist" - immediately. In fact, it was so obvious I didn't really see it as a twist. So yeah, we're talking about that powder room scene where two "good looking dames" hold up the entire group of jewelry - clad ladies. As soon as the scene began, while Jean was indeed powdering her nose (and looking rueful about the sudden appearance of Steve's "ghost"), I noticed someone exceptionally tall for a woman walking into the place. I thought, "who's that? That's a pretty tall woman, and there must be some reason why the camera's showing her in the background." Sure enough, the tall "dame", along with another odd-looking woman, a blonde, whip out ..... -whip out their guns, you didn't think I was going to say something else did you?  (sorry, in these "MeToo" days I couldn't resist) - and demand everyone hand over their jewelry. Well, geez, don't those two dames look kind of like - like a couple of guys in drag? I don't want to sound smart-azz, but shirley everyone spotted this right away.  ??

Anyway, I loved this kinky little "twist", or whatever you want to call it. It was especially fun that everyone - including the few male witnesses who spotted them before they made their getaway - described our two robbers in drag as "really good-looking" dames.  And I got a big kick out of Steve figuring it out when he went to talk to the mastermind behind the stick-up, and noticed the hideaway was right next to a "Wigs and Make-up" emporium, and behind a dance instruction studio. Steve walks through this studio, where someone's playing some crazy tune on the piano and about a dozen different dancers, both male, female, and ,uh, variations in-between, are all dancing to this same tune, but in all different genres of dance - ballet, jazz, and some bizarre same-sex Harlequin number. By the time Steve reaches the door to the gangster's office, he's figured out what he already suspected: the "very good-looking" powder room thieves were men !  

And you get the feeling that these guys weren't just posing as women to throw off the police (though that sure helped.) There's some dialogue that indicates they're drag "artistes", they do it all the time (although maybe not always to pull off a heist), and that they are in fact gay, and probably a couple. All this in 1951 ? I love it !

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Sorry to take up two posts talking about "No Questions Asked", but the drag thing deserved its own post.

SPOILERAMA

That (the drag "twist") was the delicious icing on this well-baked noir cake (sorry, I'm in a silly mood), but the whole film is hugely entertaining from beginning to end. I'm not the biggest fan of Barry Sullivan, but I have to say he's pretty darn good in this. As is Arlene Dahl (she really had me guessing for a while, whose side she was on). But, as I think Eddie pointed out in his commentary, it's Jean Hagen who's the real star of the picture. I love Jean, everything she did was interesting and fun ; in fact, she's an actress who always looks like she's having a good time in whatever she's in. This is not to say that she doesn't look convincingly sad when sadness is required. For instance, when Barry/Steve dumps her (and he doesn't even have to dump her, she knows as soon as he walks into the restaurant where they're supposed to have a date), she gets drunk. But she gets drunk in style, with a little cake and candle, plenty of champagne (I think it's champagne), and a torch song she sings in accompaniment to the jukebox (it's "I've Got You Under My Skin", and since we all know Jean can really sing, I was kind of disappointed when she was interrupted after only two lines....) How come Steve can't see that she's the girl for him, not that scheming false-hearted Ellen?

A few other things in "No Questions Asked" that delighted me:  you just know that there's a reason for that pool scene where the gangster, Franko, is practicing holding his breath under water. But it's still fun. Franko -played by a gleeful Howard Petrie - comes across as so mild-mannered and goofy, it's hard to imagine him as a threat. But don't let the speech about "beating the Olympic record" and his slightly nerdy demeanour fool you, he's a mean one. Like, for instance, later in the film, he doesn't hesitate to consider using steam to scald the perfidious Ellen into telling where the jewels are. I've never seen scalding used as a method of torture before, and for some reason I had to laugh at the ingeniousness of the idea. (I'm not a sadist -- you don't actually see or even hear anyone being scalded, and in fact I think they don't actually do it -- it's just the originality of the idea that amused me.)

Anyway, lots of neat little details like that in this film to enjoy. Thank you, Eddie, for bringing "No Questions Asked" to TCM, and to at least one noir fan who got a fresh dose of noir today. Honestly - no question about it.

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SPOILER ALERT.

I didnt catch on to the ladies' heist right away, but I thought at the time the blonde was NOT attractive!!! So it wasnt a big surprise in the car, especially when they started talking. Was nice to see Bill Reynolds and Richard Anderson early in their careers. Reynolds was billed REGNOLDS in the credits. I thought Bill made a pretty dame! The other twist, I wasnt sure which "dame" was responsible, but I was glad it turned out NOT to be Hagen, as she seemed so genuine. I didnt get any gay context about the 2 "gals" at all. Was just part of their routine. Wish I'd recorded the film to watch again, but I'm sure it'll be shown again in Noir Alley re-runs......Dont really understand why Dahl's husband got involved when he was rich to start with. Maybe he wasnt so rich???

Did Dahl ever have a role that required acting ability? (not saying she cant act, but I've yet to see her in anything that required much). Here, it's Hagen that has the meatier part.......

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19 hours ago, calvinnme said:

Men! They are always stupid about women, but only in the movies do they learn their lesson!

That statement is so out of touch with what has been going on,  I'm going to pretend you spend all of your time watching studio era movies.    ;)

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