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18 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

Could you be thinking of Housewife (1934)? In this movie Dvorak pours herself and her husband (George Brent) a few and urges him to go into business for himself.

Yes, Ann and I worked well together!

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11 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Burr (just not believable to me as any sort of ladies man)

Agreed. Ham-fisted pick-up attempts in the switchboard room aside, he was a "pin-up" artist and like fashion photography the profession carries a bit of 'rock-star' veneer. Clearly he had no trouble getting girls upstairs to pose. I found him pretty weak in the masher department too. He didn't have to ply Norah with alcohol, she was the one ordering all the Pearl Divers. Yes, he got grabby while she was trying to leave as blotto as she was, it was her that escalated the violence.  Which is why I ask about the Micky Finn in the coffee. That would show clear criminal intent, but they kind of suggest it, then let it lay there. 

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23 hours ago, laffite said:

Harry Prebble may have been louche but he is hell on wheels with a brew. That was the fastest hot cup of coffee in the history of the world.

I actually wondered if we're supposed to think he added some booze to the coffee...as if Norah weren't drunk enough already !

edit:  ok,  I see Moe and Dargo already made that observation.

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9 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Eddie immediately got defensive at the top of his intro  to THE BLUE GARDENIA by telling us that many Lang fans (and I include myself) think it's one of the director's lesser efforts, and I must unfortunately agree.  The only interesting thing Muller could drum up to say about it was that hipsters who are into "Tiki culture" would enjoy the kitschy Polynesian mise-en-scene at that Chinese restaurant where Baxter has her fateful meeting with Burr.     

Waste of a fine cast -- Conte (his role was woefully underwritten), Sothern (blossomed into a wonderful character actress; I've always liked her), Baxter (not a part she could sink her teeth into) , Burr (just not believable to me as any sort of ladies man) and Donnell (she impressed me with realistic performances in SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS and IN A LONELY PLACE but here Jeff's pulp mystery book lover seems almost like a cartoon.

I don't think Fritz had his heart in this one, I truly don't.  Plodding all around, even dull in spots.

 

 

Ah.  We disagree on this one,  Bronxie.  Although I suspect the majority are with you on the opinion that The Blue Gardenia  is one of Fritz Lang's lesser works.  And maybe it is.  I mean yeah,  when you compare it to  Scarlet Street or The Big Heat  or even Rancho Notorious  ( and many others) ,  T.B.G. might be perceived as coming up short.

Ok,  I guess it's not a great film.  But for me, it's an enjoyable one.  For one thing,  I think it's fun.  I get a kick out of that Polynesian bar .   Yes, Eddie mentioned "tikki" but I don't know anything about that,  I just thought the place was fun.  Exotic Chinese food  ( the stuff Raymond Burr ordered,  I've never even heard of !)  and those Pearl Diver drinks,  the over-done decor,  the blind lady selling gardenias,  and of course, Nat King Cole singing the title song ! 

Another feature I really enjoyed was the set-up of the three women sharing a flat like that.  They all three slept in the living room ! How's that for privacy !  And they had a schedule they'd worked out,  whose turn it was to do the dishes or "make the orange juice" in the morning.  They had it all worked out, right down to sharing their clothes.  In reality, such a situation would probably drive me crazy, but in movieworld,  it's fun to see a domestic solution like that.

I always like Richard Conte, and he and Richard Erdman make an entertaining team.  And I don't agree that Anne Baxter had little to do , I thought she gave a fine and sympathetic performance as the bewildered and frightened young woman who's not sure exactly what happened and has no way of really finding out.

The whole date-rape scenario was interesting.  Now of course,  we can see the set-up Burr's character was creating as the contemptible behaviour it is.  But back then, I guess a girl was supposed to look out for herself and be careful.  Funny the double standard they had then.   It's not clear what would have happened if Norah had not hauled off with that poker.  Would Harry have raped her?  

Also,  you have to wonder what happened after he was whacked with that poker.   SPOILERS   So, Norah hits him with the poker and then passes out , she can't remember anything when she comes to, and stumbles away.  But apparently she did not render Harry unconscious, since he was up and walking around when the record shop woman showed up.    And that record shop woman...it's clear that Harry got her pregnant and she now wants him to either marry her or "help her get rid of the problem".  This was pretty volatile stuff for 1953, but of course, it's all sort of coded.  Poor record shop lady,  they really picked an older,  not particularly attractive woman to play this character.  Guess we're supposed to think Harry couldn't get any of his usual girlfriends the night he went out with her.

Anyway,  as I said,  for me , The Blue Gardenia may not be a top-drawer Lang  (or even a top-drawer noir), but it's fun.  And I'm never bored, which is always something.

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41 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Ah.  We disagree on this one,  Bronxie.  Although I suspect the majority are with you on the opinion that The Blue Gardenia  is one of Fritz Lang's lesser works.  And maybe it is.  I mean yeah,  when you compare it to  Scarlet Street or The Big Heat  or even Rancho Notorious  ( and many others) ,  T.B.G. might be perceived as coming up short.

Ok,  I guess it's not a great film.  But for me, it's an enjoyable one.  For one thing,  I think it's fun.  I get a kick out of that Polynesian bar .   Yes, Eddie mentioned "tikki" but I don't know anything about that,  I just thought the place was fun.  Exotic Chinese food  ( the stuff Raymond Burr ordered,  I've never even heard of !)  and those Pearl Diver drinks,  the over-done decor,  the blind lady selling gardenias,  and of course, Nat King Cole singing the title song ! 

Another feature I really enjoyed was the set-up of the three women sharing a flat like that.  They all three slept in the living room ! How's that for privacy !  And they had a schedule they'd worked out,  whose turn it was to do the dishes or "make the orange juice" in the morning.  They had it all worked out, right down to sharing their clothes.  In reality, such a situation would probably drive me crazy, but in movieworld,  it's fun to see a domestic solution like that.

I always like Richard Conte, and he and Richard Erdman make an entertaining team.  And I don't agree that Anne Baxter had little to do , I thought she gave a fine and sympathetic performance as the bewildered and frightened young woman who's not sure exactly what happened and has no way of really finding out.

The whole date-rape scenario was interesting.  Now of course,  we can see the set-up Burr's character was creating as the contemptible behaviour it is.  But back then, I guess a girl was supposed to look out for herself and be careful.  Funny the double standard they had then.   It's not clear what would have happened if Norah had not hauled off with that poker.  Would Harry have raped her?  

Also,  you have to wonder what happened after he was whacked with that poker.   SPOILERS   So, Norah hits him with the poker and then passes out , she can't remember anything when she comes to, and stumbles away.  But apparently she did not render Harry unconscious, since he was up and walking around when the record shop woman showed up.    And that record shop woman...it's clear that Harry got her pregnant and she now wants him to either marry her or "help her get rid of the problem".  This was pretty volatile stuff for 1953, but of course, it's all sort of coded.  Poor record shop lady,  they really picked an older,  not particularly attractive woman to play this character.  Guess we're supposed to think Harry couldn't get any of his usual girlfriends the night he went out with her.

Anyway,  as I said,  for me , The Blue Gardenia may not be a top-drawer Lang  (or even a top-drawer noir), but it's fun.  And I'm never bored, which is always something.

IF this film (which btw, I still think is only questionably a "noir") IS considered one of "Lang's lesser ones", then I'd say that this probably has most to do with its happy ending finale.

(...bottom line though here...I'm with ya on this MissW...I've always found it an entertaing little film with very good acting all-around, and that moves along at a decent pace)

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The scene in the restaurant when I wondered if this is a musical and I’m tuned in to the wrong channel watching Nat King Cole was awful.  I almost turned the tv off when that same song we had to listen to AGAIN came on the record player. I couldn’t believe it.  What kind of bad movie is this?  But once Nat King Cole was through and Norah finds herself in trouble I was hooked.  Then I got to thinking is that how Fritz Lang set it up?  Loved the legs of the mystery reader roommate. Sexy for sure.  

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13 minutes ago, Thompson said:

Loved the legs of the mystery reader roommate. Sexy for sure.

Here is an early Christmas gift for you.    The actress was Jeff Donnell. 

Noir's Goon Squad: Jeff Donnell (This Goon's a Gal) - Criminal Element8X10 PRINT JEFF Donnell Sexy Leggy Pin Up Roughshot 1949 #JDAA - $15.99 |  PicClick

 

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Polynesian Pearl Diver

1 1/2 ounces Puerto Rican rum
1/2 ounce Demerara rum
1/2 ounce Jamaican rum
1 barspoon Velvet falernum
1 ounce orange juice
3/4 ounce lime juice
3/4 ounce Pearl Diver's Mix, (see Editor's Note)
6 ounces crushed ice
Garnish: an orchid

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Was wondering what the part of the cocktail that sort of looked like a white corndog sticking out of the top was? Must be something to do with the  barspoon Velvet falernum.

And you'd think Eddie would have talked about that cocktail also in the outro (or be sipping on one, no?), that woulda been a natural sidebar.

 

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1 hour ago, Thompson said:

The scene in the restaurant when I wondered if this is a musical and I’m tuned in to the wrong channel watching Nat King Cole was awful.  I almost turned the tv off when that same song we had to listen to AGAIN came on the record player. I couldn’t believe it.  What kind of bad movie is this?  But once Nat King Cole was through and Norah finds herself in trouble I was hooked.  Then I got to thinking is that how Fritz Lang set it up?

Repetition helps the viewer realize that it's a different record/song playing when the body was found. That different record is the key to solving the caper.

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Oh yeah, for sure.  What a great eye opener for Conte, a great plot device.  Then you remember the real killer dame with the 8 1/2 shoes who gets no satisfaction from her frantic call to the newspaper.  It all falls into place for the viewer almost too late, but thankfully we don’t  have to listen to Blue Gardenia again.  I liked the movie.  Maybe Burr came off a bit false, and Conte’s not really a cigarette smoker, but all in all an entertaining film (noir?).

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32 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Was wondering what the part of the cocktail that sort of looked like a white corndog sticking out of the top was? Must be something to do with the  barspoon Velvet falernum.

I was wondering about that myself - after looking around on the internet, I think those are 'ice cones', apparently used to dress up tropical drinks.

H5s2oJc.jpg

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1 minute ago, dinie said:

I really like Jess Donnell.  She was a lot of fun.  she guest starred on Gidget too!

Jeff Donnell of course, not Jess! (lol)

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52 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Polynesian Pearl Diver

1 1/2 ounces Puerto Rican rum
1/2 ounce Demerara rum
1/2 ounce Jamaican rum
1 barspoon Velvet falernum
1 ounce orange juice
3/4 ounce lime juice
3/4 ounce Pearl Diver's Mix, (see Editor's Note)
6 ounces crushed ice
Garnish: an orchid

Sounds delish,  I was wondering about the recipe!

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

Polynesian Pearl Diver

1 1/2 ounces Puerto Rican rum
1/2 ounce Demerara rum
1/2 ounce Jamaican rum
1 barspoon Velvet falernum
1 ounce orange juice
3/4 ounce lime juice
3/4 ounce Pearl Diver's Mix, (see Editor's Note)
6 ounces crushed ice
Garnish: an orchid

One would kill me! Lol.

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A shout out to all the boys in Korea. It's a police action, don't ya know. Then Anne gets that

Dear Norah letter. Losing her soldier beau because of commie shrapnel. That will do it every

time. And old Harry. Working overtime to get into Norah's pants and only getting a poker up the

side of the head. Ouch. Burr was much more of a gentlemen on Perry Mason. He might engage 

in some mild flirtation, but he never went further than that and there were a lot of sexy babes

throwing themselves at him. Pretty entertaining flick with some interesting angles, though the

boy meets girl love story of Conte and Baster was pretty lame. If I recall it correctly, Eddie made

it sound like the song Blue Gardenia was a big hit for Nat King Cole, but it was the B side of a

song that was mildly successful, not that it matters much. I'd give this one a 81, adding a point or

two for the phrase commie shrapnel. Ain't no shrapnel......

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Maybe my favorite part of the movie is Wagner. The clue for the newspaper man thinking that Norah might be innocent was the story regarding the music, changing from Nat Kind Cole to Richard Wagner. Interesting that they chose perhaps the most ethereally beautiful love theme in the world, Liebestod from "Tristan and isolde."  The theme appears early but then is used rather extensively near the end when we see the real perpetrator going through the motions of suicide and later in a hospital bed and synchronized rather effectively (if not brilliantly) with the action on screen.

Oh, come on, try and listen to some of this. Extraordinary!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLoHcB8A63M

 

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I use the hard “g” when pronouncing  “singer,” but only for the real good ones.  That’s Wagner, huh?  That was the song on the turntable?  No. That’s in the score?  Nice.

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20 minutes ago, Thompson said:

I use the hard “g” when pronouncing  “singer,” but only for the real good ones.  That’s Wagner, huh?  That was the song on the turntable?  No. That’s in the score?  Nice.

The song on the turntable was an orchestral version only, which is very popular as a concert piece. The clip I posted is also the orchestral version but with the vocal sung over it and with slight deviations from the orchestral part.

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22 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

I was wondering about that myself - after looking around on the internet, I think those are 'ice cones', apparently used to dress up tropical drinks.

H5s2oJc.jpg

That drink is ALL ice!

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I meant to add an anecdote to the Wagner used in The Blue Gardenia, but forgot. Tony Randall was a big opera fan and once told Dick Cavett on the latter's daytime talk show, that some particularly avid conductors of this aria would, (and Tony references the particularly voluptuous crescendo that ends the piece) that some conductors. I say, would actually undergo the "complete experience" at the conclusion. I remember Mr Cavett letting out a loud "WOW!!" at that.

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20 hours ago, Vautrin said:

A shout out to all the boys in Korea. It's a police action, don't ya know. Then Anne gets that

Dear Norah letter. Losing her soldier beau because of commie shrapnel. That will do it every

time. And old Harry. Working overtime to get into Norah's pants and only getting a poker up the

side of the head. Ouch. Burr was much more of a gentlemen on Perry Mason. He might engage 

in some mild flirtation, but he never went further than that and there were a lot of sexy babes

throwing themselves at him. Pretty entertaining flick with some interesting angles, though the

boy meets girl love story of Conte and Baster was pretty lame. If I recall it correctly, Eddie made

it sound like the song Blue Gardenia was a big hit for Nat King Cole, but it was the B side of a

song that was mildly successful, not that it matters much. I'd give this one a 81, adding a point or

two for the phrase commie shrapnel. Ain't no shrapnel......

 

I think you are mixing up the plot with another movie. Baxter's boyfriend doesn't die, he writes her a Dear Norah letter dumping her for some nurse he met. LOL. The cad!

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