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21 minutes ago, Hibi said:

No, he just sent her a very cold letter saying he's dumping her!

Not that the fiance could have had any control over this, but what makes it sting even more is that Baxter delayed opening the letter.  She held out for her birthday, fantasizing about celebrating her birthday with champagne, candlelight, and a homecooked dinner while reading a love letter from her beau.  Instead, she has an overcooked roast and a "Dear Norah" letter.  In that respect, it's no wonder that she takes Raymond Burr up on his dinner and drinks offer, even though she has no idea who he is. 

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14 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

In that respect, it's no wonder that she takes Raymond Burr up on his dinner and drinks offer, even though she has no idea who he is. 

Seems like she would have a pretty good idea about Burr. It's indicated that he's a frequent lurker in the switchboard room and has had at least one of the girls in his studio posing. And girls talk.

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2 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

Seems like she would have a pretty good idea about Burr. It's indicated that he's a frequent lurker in the switchboard room and has had at least one of the girls in his studio posing. And girls talk.

 

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9 hours ago, Hibi said:

No, he just sent her a very cold letter saying he's dumping her!

I didn't think it was all that cold.   Judging by what we see from the letter ,  he does try to "let her down gently".  There's no use his pretending to love her and still want to marry her if he's met someone else.   There's no way such a letter is ever going to feel good to the person who's being dumped, no matter how it's worded.  The guy did the best he could.

I feel a bit silly defending this person,  who never appears in the movie except as a photo  lovingly displayed on Norah's table.  In a way, he's a "Mcguffin", in that his rejection of Norah sets up the situation in which she is heart-broken, which makes her reckless, which is why she accepts Raymond Burr's dinner date  ( not informing him that she is Anne Sothern's room-mate.)  On goes the black taffeta dress and suede shoes,  and out goes Norah, not caring if she gets drunk or that she's dating a man she's never met.

However,  just to get back to her ex-fiance    (again,  I can't even remember his name,  I have no particular interest in him, really):  it's a sad fact of life that sometimes people think they want to marry someone  but then meet someone else whom they realize they are in love with,  which means they are no longer in love  (if they ever were)  with the first person.  In this case,  it's just better to inform the one they're rejecting as quickly and kindly as possible.  No sense in staying with them when they'd rather be with someone else.    This does not make the one doing the rejecting a bad  or cold person,  it's just the way things are sometimes.

Of course, getting back to The Blue Gardenia, the guy's rejection of Norah just makes an ideal set-up for Norah to decide to go out on a blind date-  she's probably despondently thinking,  why not? I might as well...

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3 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Seems like she would have a pretty good idea about Burr. It's indicated that he's a frequent lurker in the switchboard room and has had at least one of the girls in his studio posing. And girls talk.

It's made clear she decides to meet him to get even with her boyfriend. She initially turns him down.....

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47 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

I didn't think it was all that cold.   Judging by what we see from the letter ,  he does try to "let her down gently".  There's no use his pretending to love her and still want to marry her if he's met someone else.   There's no way such a letter is ever going to feel good to the person who's being dumped, no matter how it's worded.  The guy did the best he could.

I feel a bit silly defending this person,  who never appears in the movie except as a photo  lovingly displayed on Norah's table.  In a way, he's a "Mcguffin", in that his rejection of Norah sets up the situation in which she is heart-broken, which makes her reckless, which is why she accepts Raymond Burr's dinner date  ( not informing him that she is Anne Sothern's room-mate.)  On goes the black taffeta dress and suede shoes,  and out goes Norah, not caring if she gets drunk or that she's dating a man she's never met.

However,  just to get back to her ex-fiance    (again,  I can't even remember his name,  I have no particular interest in him, really):  it's a sad fact of life that sometimes people think they want to marry someone  but then meet someone else whom they realize they are in love with,  which means they are no longer in love  (if they ever were)  with the first person.  In this case,  it's just better to inform the one they're rejecting as quickly and kindly as possible.  No sense in staying with them when they'd rather be with someone else.    This does not make the one doing the rejecting a bad  or cold person,  it's just the way things are sometimes.

Of course, getting back to The Blue Gardenia, the guy's rejection of Norah just makes an ideal set-up for Norah to decide to go out on a blind date-  sh'es probably despondently thinking,  why not? I might as well...

Sorry, the matter of fact way he writes the letter made me think he was a clod. We'll have to agree to disagree on this one. Weirdly the opposite was true irl, I would think. Girls dumping their boyfriends on the front and moving on with their lives......

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10 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

 

Was there EVER a more fair-haired sultry lass than Julie London? In both appearance AND in voice?

For those here not old enough to remember her, the answer would be "no".

(...btw, did Julie ever play a femme fatale in any noirs?...she sure would've made a good one, if she didn't)

 

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Noir fans have much to look forward to in the coming weeks, as TCM is presenting “Friday Night Neo-Noir” in July.

The lineup is (ET):

July 2
    08:00 PM   Harper (1966)
    10:15 PM   Point Blank (1967)
    12:00 AM   Warning Shot (1967)

July 9
    08:00 PM   Get Carter (1971)
    10:00 PM   The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973)
    12:00 AM   Chinatown (1974)

July 16
    08:00 PM   Pulp (1972)
    09:45 PM   Body Heat (1981) (a TCM premiere)
    12:00 AM   To Live and Die in L.A. (1985)

July 23
    08:00 PM   Blood Simple (1984)
    10:00 PM   Night Moves (1975)
    11:45 AM   Cutter's Way (1981) (a TCM premiere)

July 30
    08:00 PM   Blade Runner: The Final Cut (1982) (a TCM premiere)
    10:15 PM   Mona Lisa (1986)
    12:15 AM   Tequila Sunrise (1988) (a TCM premiere)


Plus there is also the regular Sat-Sun Noir Alley schedule:

June 26, 27 - Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
July 3          - Guilty Bystander (1950) (a TCM premiere) (no Noir Alley repeat on July 4th)
July 10, 11   - The Bribe (1949)
July 17, 18   - Los Tallos Amargos (1956) (a TCM premiere)
July 24, 25  - Cause for Alarm! (1951)
July 31         - Hollow Triumph (1948) (Summer Under the Stars starts on Aug. 1)


If Eddie has prepared the intros for all of these, he must have been very busy.

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15 hours ago, Dargo said:

Was there EVER a more fair-haired sultry lass than Julie London? In both appearance AND in voice?

For those here not old enough to remember her, the answer would be "no".

(...btw, did Julie ever play a femme fatale in any noirs?...she sure would've made a good one, if she didn't)

 

Not sure about noirs, but Julie London was the female lead in an Anthony Mann western, opposite Gary Cooper:  Man of the West,  I think it's called.  .Julie is certainly very sultry and attractive in it, although by no means a femme fatale type.

edit: I just looked her up.  I had no idea she was in so many films, I've always thought of her primarily as a singer.  Here's a link to her filmography, should you be interested:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julie_London_filmography

 

 

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11 minutes ago, cmovieviewer said:

Noir fans have much to look forward to in the coming weeks, as TCM is presenting “Friday Night Neo-Noir” in July.

The lineup is (ET):

July 2
    08:00 PM   Harper (1966)
    10:15 PM   Point Blank (1967)
    12:00 AM   Warning Shot (1967)

July 9
    08:00 PM   Get Carter (1971)
    10:00 PM   The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973)
    12:00 AM   Chinatown (1974)

July 16
    08:00 PM   Pulp (1972)
    09:45 PM   Body Heat (1981) (a TCM premiere)
    12:00 AM   To Live and Die in L.A. (1985)

July 23
    08:00 PM   Blood Simple (1984)
    10:00 PM   Night Moves (1975)
    11:45 AM   Cutter's Way (1981) (a TCM premiere)

July 30
    08:00 PM   Blade Runner: The Final Cut (1982) (a TCM premiere)
    10:15 PM   Mona Lisa (1986)
    12:15 AM   Tequila Sunrise (1988) (a TCM premiere)


Plus there is also the regular Sat-Sun Noir Alley schedule:

June 26, 27 - Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
July 3          - Guilty Bystander (1950) (a TCM premiere) (no Noir Alley repeat on July 4th)
July 10, 11   - The Bribe (1949)
July 17, 18   - Los Tallos Amargos (1956) (a TCM premiere)
July 24, 25  - Cause for Alarm! (1951)
July 31         - Hollow Triumph (1948) (Summer Under the Stars starts on Aug. 1)


If Eddie has prepared the intros for all of these, he must have been very busy.

Body Heat should be watched with the A/C turned off.😃

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By behind the beat I don’t mean off beat.  JJG can explain it better I’m sure, but the singer is “on” beat but just a subtle tad behind.  Guitar players do it too, but drummers abhor it, or so I’m told.  The greatest example of this ability as a singer is a live solo performance circa ‘65 of Bob Dylan doing One Too Many Mornings.  I’d add the link but there isn’t one.  I have it on a bootleg album but it is not on the internet or YouTube.  So Dylan is able to pat his head and rub his belly at the same time.  Anyway, to bring the post back to Noir Alley, when I watched Aldo Ray in the feature film some weeks back, I said to myself, “You know, this guy acts behind the beat.”

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9 minutes ago, Thompson said:

By behind the beat I don’t mean off beat.  JJG can explain it better I’m sure, but the singer is “on” beat but just a subtle tad behind.  Guitar players do it too, but drummers abhor it, or so I’m told.  The greatest example of this ability as a singer is a live solo performance circa ‘65 of Bob Dylan doing One Too Many Mornings.  I’d add the link but there isn’t one.  I have it on a bootleg album but it is not on the internet or YouTube.  So Dylan is able to pat his head and rub his belly at the same time.  Anyway, to bring the post back to Noir Alley, when I watched Aldo Ray in the feature film some weeks back, I said to myself, “You know, this guy acts behind the beat.”

I think the word you're looking for is rubato...

/ro͞oˈbädō/
 
MUSIC
noun
 
  1. the temporary disregarding of strict tempo to allow an expressive quickening or slackening, usually without altering the overall pace.
     
adjective
 
  1. performed rubato.
    "a rubato phrase"
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54 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Julie London was in a few crime\noir films in the 50s:   The Fat Man (1951) and Crime Against Joe (1956).

The Fat Man (film) - Wikipedia29 Best Julie London Bobby Troop ideas | julie london, london, bobby troupLittle-known cinema: 'Crime Against Joe'

And also in Noirs The 3rd Voice (1960) and The Red House (1947)

The 3rd Voice Movie Poster (#2 of 5) - IMP Awards

The Red House (film) - Wikipedia

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Tiff - I know what you are referring to (I think) like Willie Nelson hopping all around in his phrasing and such.  What fascinates me is the whole idea of being consistently one minute, almost indiscernible fraction  of a second behind the beat throughout the song.  It’s like Keith Richards describing his band - “Man, how do they do that?”

There sure is a lot of stuff that goes into the making of a film.  Nat King Cole, I don’t know.

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5 hours ago, Thompson said:

Tiff - I know what you are referring to (I think) like Willie Nelson hopping all around in his phrasing and such.  What fascinates me is the whole idea of being consistently one minute, almost indiscernible fraction  of a second behind the beat throughout the song.  It’s like Keith Richards describing his band - “Man, how do they do that?”

There sure is a lot of stuff that goes into the making of a film.  Nat King Cole, I don’t know.

This is also called "backphrasing." Sometimes singers will sing on the beat the first time through, then do a little backphrasing on the repeat.

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8 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

Noir fans have much to look forward to in the coming weeks, as TCM is presenting “Friday Night Neo-Noir” in July.

The lineup is (ET):

July 2
    08:00 PM   Harper (1966)
    10:15 PM   Point Blank (1967)
    12:00 AM   Warning Shot (1967)

July 9
    08:00 PM   Get Carter (1971)
    10:00 PM   The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973)
    12:00 AM   Chinatown (1974)

July 16
    08:00 PM   Pulp (1972)
    09:45 PM   Body Heat (1981) (a TCM premiere)
    12:00 AM   To Live and Die in L.A. (1985)

July 23
    08:00 PM   Blood Simple (1984)
    10:00 PM   Night Moves (1975)
    11:45 AM   Cutter's Way (1981) (a TCM premiere)

July 30
    08:00 PM   Blade Runner: The Final Cut (1982) (a TCM premiere)
    10:15 PM   Mona Lisa (1986)
    12:15 AM   Tequila Sunrise (1988) (a TCM premiere)


Plus there is also the regular Sat-Sun Noir Alley schedule:

June 26, 27 - Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
July 3          - Guilty Bystander (1950) (a TCM premiere) (no Noir Alley repeat on July 4th)
July 10, 11   - The Bribe (1949)
July 17, 18   - Los Tallos Amargos (1956) (a TCM premiere)
July 24, 25  - Cause for Alarm! (1951)
July 31         - Hollow Triumph (1948) (Summer Under the Stars starts on Aug. 1)


If Eddie has prepared the intros for all of these, he must have been very busy.

Thanks for the reminders. I have been waiting for a few of these for a while.

Especially interested in July 16 and 23 entries. Let's hope the schedule stays as called.

 

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9 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Julie London was in a few crime\noir films in the 50s:   The Fat Man (1951) and Crime Against Joe (1956).

The Fat Man (film) - Wikipedia29 Best Julie London Bobby Troop ideas | julie london, london, bobby troupLittle-known cinema: 'Crime Against Joe'

 

8 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

And also in Noirs The 3rd Voice (1960) and The Red House (1947)

The 3rd Voice Movie Poster (#2 of 5) - IMP Awards

The Red House (film) - Wikipedia

So James and CJ, of these four films you guys mentioned here, I'm only familiar with The Red House that featured Julie London, and in which I know she she played the small town "loose" girl in it and so wasn't really any sort of femme fatale in that one.

And so of the other three, does she play the femme fatale in any one of the other films?

(...because as I said, I've always thought she could've probably been well cast in that type of role)

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7 hours ago, Dargo said:

And so of the other three, does she play the femme fatale in any one of the other films?

No, but in the 3rd Voice it's strongly implied that she is a hooker.

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Hitchcock has an interesting major Achilles heel when it comes to his women.  They are terrible.  Maybe this one tomorrow will prove me wrong.  

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10 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

No, but in the 3rd Voice it's strongly implied that she is a hooker.

So, a hooker, but with the proverbial "heart of gold"?

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On 6/25/2021 at 12:42 PM, misswonderly3 said:

Not sure about noirs, but Julie London was the female lead in an Anthony Mann western, opposite Gary Cooper:  Man of the West,  I think it's called.  .Julie is certainly very sultry and attractive in it, although by no means a femme fatale type.

edit: I just looked her up.  I had no idea she was in so many films, I've always thought of her primarily as a singer.  Here's a link to her filmography, should you be interested:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julie_London_filmography

 

 

I had the opposite experience.  Growing up, I remember Julie starring in the TV show "Emergency!"  and I didn't know about her musical career until much later.   Here she is with husband and "Emergency!" co-star Bobby Troup, who I also found out later had a musical career and produced her big hit "Cry Me A River". 

Julie London Bobby Troup Emergency 1971.JPG

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