Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

The Birds which is on TCM right now might be the worst movie I’ve ever seen.  The blonde actress is so phony so false that I think I’m giving up movies all together.  

  • Confused 3
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Dargo said:

So, a hooker, but with the proverbial "heart of gold"?

I'm pretty sure they issue the heart of gold when you graduate the fully accredited hooker school. Problem is that pimps often commandeer the heart of gold so you gotta be very thorough when screening potential hookers. Ask to see that heart of gold. Or you could just wait to see if they buy you breakfast. 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Thompson said:

The Birds which is on TCM right now might be the worst movie I’ve ever seen.  The blonde actress is so phony so false that I think I’m giving up movies all together.  

Yeah, maybe, but wasn't the BRUNETTE actress in it pretty darn cute?!!! Well, until she got her eyes pecked out anyway.

MV5BMGE0N2NkOWItMTQ3ZS00YWE4LTg5MmQtNzQx

And which NOW brings up the thing I always thought was THE most questionable aspect about this Hitchcock flick. Yep, and even MORE so than the whole idea of birds attacking humans.

(...and THIS being, why in the world would Rod Taylor pick the blonde over HER???...what was WRONG with that guy anyway?!!!)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Dargo said:

why in the world would Rod Taylor pick the blonde over HER???.

It's gotta be that sexy nighty she picked up at Brinkmeyers hardware store. Hubba!

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Dargo said:

(...and THIS being, why in the world would Rod Taylor pick the blonde over HER???...what was WRONG with that guy anyway?!!!)

Because Rod Taylor was suffering from a case of Eloi fever.  Anyway, Rod's loss was Bob Newhart's gain.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Shadow Of A Doubt (1943) was on Noir Alley.

This is my favorite Hitchcock film and also in my top ten favorite films of all time. One thing I liked about it is the killer, Uncle Charlie is one of the most unlikely villains in movies up to that time. He is a well dressed, charming gentleman so no one would suspect. His niece, also named Charlie, adores him and when she finds out the truth, her whole world is shattered. Both of them feel that they more than uncle and niece, more like twins. But Uncle Charlie is the dark side whereas Young Charlie is sweetness and light. We first meet Uncle Charlie in a depressing boarding house and then we see Young Charlie's idyllic, almost dream like small town. Then Uncle Charlie arrives and brings nightmares. One of the most striking  and "noir" like scenes is when the two confront each other in shadow, Young Charlie shows a bit a of dark side when she threatens to kill her uncle. There is also expected black comedy relief supplied by the eccentric neighbor Herbie, who is fascinated by murder stories, not realizing a real murderer is living next to him. Hitchcock supplies all his usual ingredients as well as the final ironic touch of Uncle Charlie being hailed as a great man by townspeople.

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Does anyone know how Hitchcock came up with The Merry Widow Waltz/

Not sure I'm following the question.  It's a waltz from the operetta The Merry Widow.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed Eddie Mulller’s intro and outro, as I always do, so I hate to point out a factual error in his SHADOW OF A DOUBT  intro.

While talking about the interesting and varied group of writers that contributed to the script, Eddie said that writer Sally Benson wrote a book called “Junior Miss” that became the basis for the movie MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS.  This wasn’t the case.

Benson’s book “Junior Miss” was actually the basis for a play, movie, and radio show of the same name.   (By the way, the movie JUNIOR MISS is excellent.)

MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS was instead based on Benson’s series of vignettes in The New Yorker published under the title “5135 Kensington,” an address mentioned in the movie’s song “The Boy Next Door.”

Benson was a versatile writer.  Besides SHADOW OF A DOUBT, she also wrote screenplays for movies as varied as ANNA AND THE KING OF SIAM and VIVA LAS VEGAS.

Anyway, aside from this one glitch, Eddie did his usual great job of choosing and introducing an interesting and, to me, unexpected movie for Noir Alley this week.  Thanks, Eddie!

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, BingFan said:

I enjoyed Eddie Mulller’s intro and outro, as I always do, so I hate to point out a factual error in his SHADOW OF A DOUBT  intro.

I wish he had spoke more about what makes this a "noir" film. He doesn't even mention the shadowy confrontation scene between the two Charlies.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Does anyone know how Hitchcock came up with The Merry Widow Waltz/

 

27 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Not sure I'm following the question.  It's a waltz from the operetta The Merry Widow.

Right, chaya,  as txfilmfan says,  it's an already existing piece of music, from the opera  (or, ok,  operetta)  "The Merry Widow",  by someone called Franz Lehar.  I think it's his main claim to fame.  According to wikipaedia, it was first performed in 1905.  Even though neither the composer nor the operetta itself are all that well-known,  the waltz from "The Merry Widow", known,  I assume,  as "the Merry Widow waltz",  is pretty famous.

Of course it's a completely appropriate piece of music to come into Charlie's head  (and also her mother's),  as Uncle Charlie pursued and murdered widows, albeit perhaps not so merry ones.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I love Shadow of a Doubt, it's one of my favourite Hitchcock films.  I've seen it many times, and each time I get something out of it.

For one thing,  all the players are perfect in their roles.  Nobody could have played Charlie, the innocent but very smart young girl who's the lead character,   as well as Teresa Wright does.  She really nails the dawning realization that her beloved uncle is not at all what she'd always adoringly thought he was -- it's a key moment in the film when she reads the article in the paper and discovers the truth about him.  Wright really captures all the complex emotions Charlie would be feeling:  denial (at first),  shock, sadness, disillusionment, horror,  disgust,  and finally, fear.  

But all the actors are good in this.  I really enjoy the ongoing "how to commit murder" conversations between Henry Travers and Hume Cronyn- they're both so funny !

Two bit players who never get mentioned,  but who in their own way really add to the flavour of the film, are  Charlie's friend Catherine -   Estelle Jewell,  never saw her in anything else, but she's hilarious as the plain Jane friend who seems ready to flirt with anyone male in sight, even Wallace Ford !  She's always smiling demurely and looking at the ground. 

Also, another peer of Charlie's,  the pretty but weary young waitress at the bar Charlie and her uncle slip into.  I think her character's name was Louise,  she was played by someone called Janet Shaw  (?)   I love it that even though she's from the same graduating high school class as Charlie, her path has taken a very different turn.  She can't get a "respectable" job, so she's waitressing at the local dive.  The way she speaks when she explains why she's working there to Charlie, and when she looks at the ring- there's a world of sadness and resignation and weariness in her voice,  even though she can't be any older than 19 or so.  She only has about 5 minutes, but they're memorable.

One thing that really struck me this time round:  Charlie knows her uncle is dangerous, that he's a killer.  And yet she clearly does not hide what she knows about  him. She cannot pretend that she feels the same way about him.   Especially after his two attempts on her life  (the broken stair and the carbon monoxide filled garage),  you have to wonder why she doesn't try to hide her fear and loathing of him.  She makes him suspect she's going to turn him in -- and she would, if not for her concern for her mother.  When she finds the incriminating ring back in Uncle Charlie's drawer, instead of keeping it to show her detective boyfriend,  she walks down the stairs and clearly reveals it to her uncle.  Why wouldn't she by this time have been fearful that any further indication from her that she is a threat to his escape will endanger her?   Of course, it makes for very dramatic cinema, I guess that's why.

It's interesting that Uncle Charlie's dark deeds all occur off-camera, before the story begins.  This way it's easier to understand why the innocent Newton family trust and like him so much.  Well, not all of them.  Just as dogs always seem to know a bad 'un one they see one,  the two kids,  especially the precocious little girl, Ann, know there's something wrong with him.

Anyway,  I understand why Eddie includes this as a noir.  It's the idea of evil lurking in the midst of goodness,  that things are not what they seem.  It's the idea of being trapped.  Not Uncle Charlie,  it's young Charlie who's trapped.  She knows her uncle's  terrible secret, but feels she can't do anything about it.  

One could make an argument that almost all Hitchcock's work in one way or another is noir  (except for Mr. and Mrs. Smith ), because there's darkness of one kind or another in so many of them.  But Hitch 's movies are in a category of their own, so I suppose if you had to say one of them was a film noir,  Shadow of a Doubt would fit the bill.

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Two bit players who never get mentioned,  but who in their own way really add to the flavour of the film, are  Charlie's friend Catherine -   Estelle Jewell,  never saw her in anything else, but she's hilarious as the plain Jane friend who seems ready to flirt with anyone male in sight, even Wallace Ford !  She's always smiling demurely and looking at the ground. 

Yes, I liked her too. She was not a professional actress but a local girl from that town. It was funny how she first sees Charlie with her uncle and then later with detective Graham, I can imagine what she was thinking!

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Teresa Wright was fantastic.  I was awed by her performance, it felt so real.  In fact all of the women actors were great, down to the telegram lady.  Agree with missW that the girl friend of Charlie with the glasses? was exceptionally good at that role.  I liked the dive bar waitress but I thought the writing of that scene was weak.  Even in a dive bar, and maybe even more so, the waitress is not going to start things off on a bad note, with a sorta bad attitude. not good for the pocket book. I also had a problem with the plot.  After thinking about it I solved it, but I don’t like to think too much anymore If I can help it  -  assuming the photographer is telling the truth and he gave Uncle Charlie a phony film and is now awaiting word from headquarters on the real film,  . . . what?  There are two guys who not only look alike but have the same initials?

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Thompson said:

The Birds which is on TCM right now might be the worst movie I’ve ever seen.  The blonde actress is so phony so false that I think I’m giving up movies all together.  

You haven't seen TORN CURTAIN, lol.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Teresa Wright was 25 when she made SHADOW OF A DOUBT;  I'm guessing the character of Charlie is supposed to be around 19, yet she refers to herself as "an old maid"  I realize it was the norm for young girls to marry young back then but thinking you're a spinster at that age -- ??

I know the running gag is that everyone ignores milquetoast neighbor Herbie (and is he supposed to be deaf?  The family keeps shouting their number one question:  "HOW'S YOUR MOTHER?") but imo they take the black humor to ridiculous and unbelievable extremes when, after saving young Charlie's life in the garage, she is still sarcastic and dismissive:  "THANKS SO MUCH, HERBIE"

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Thompson said:

The Birds which is on TCM right now might be the worst movie I’ve ever seen.  The blonde actress is so phony so false that I think I’m giving up movies all together.  

That's Tippi Hedren who also starred in Hitchcock's Marni (1964).  According to her auto-bio, Hitch, who loved to cast blondes in his movies, became very upset with her when she wouldn't "play ball" with him, telling her that he would ruin her career, which apparently he did.

The brunette in The Birds is Suzanne Pleshette who played Bob Newhart's wife in his sitcom The Bob Newhart Show for 6 seasons in the 1970s.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Shadow Of A Doubt (1943) was on Noir Alley.

This is my favorite Hitchcock film and also in my top ten favorite films of all time. One thing I liked about it is the killer, Uncle Charlie is one of the most unlikely villains in movies up to that time. He is a well dressed, charming gentleman so no one would suspect. His niece, also named Charlie, adores him and when she finds out the truth, her whole world is shattered. Both of them feel that they more than uncle and niece, more like twins. But Uncle Charlie is the dark side whereas Young Charlie is sweetness and light. We first meet Uncle Charlie in a depressing boarding house and then we see Young Charlie's idyllic, almost dream like small town. Then Uncle Charlie arrives and brings nightmares. One of the most striking  and "noir" like scenes is when the two confront each other in shadow, Young Charlie shows a bit a of dark side when she threatens to kill her uncle. There is also expected black comedy relief supplied by the eccentric neighbor Herbie, who is fascinated by murder stories, not realizing a real murderer is living next to him. Hitchcock supplies all his usual ingredients as well as the final ironic touch of Uncle Charlie being hailed as a great man by townspeople.

Hitchcock agrees!  He wrote that this was his personal favorite because it took place in a small town with the locals unaware that a serial killer was living in their mist.  (Or something like that)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, now I get the thread.  Thanks, man.  Kim Novak, the one in Rear Window. Doris Day who is on TV now, oh yeah, that awful character actress in North By Northwest - how did Hitchcock move from the actresses in this film to the above mentioned.  I don’t get that.

  • Confused 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Thompson said:

Okay, now I get the thread.  Thanks, man.  Kim Novak, the one in Rear Window. Doris Day who is on TV now, oh yeah, that awful character actress in North By Northwest - how did Hitchcock move from the actresses in this film to the above mentioned.  I don’t get that.

That would be Grace Kelly (Princess Grace of Monaco), and I guess you mean Eva Marie Saint (who was a leading lady at the time of NBNW, not a character actress, so I'm not sure if I interpreted your post correctly).  Eva Marie Saint won an Oscar for On the Waterfront.

Hitchcock directed all the blondes in his films to give off a cool, remote demeanor for the most part.   Nearly all of them have this characteristic to the point that it's a Hitchcock trope.

https://www.vogue.com/article/alfred-hitchcock-blondes-grace-kelly-platinum-hair-color

https://reelrundown.com/celebrities/Hitchcock-Blondes-Cool-Platinum-and-Daring

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yeah, maybe, but wasn't the BRUNETTE actress in it pretty darn cute?!!! Well, until she got her eyes pecked out anyway.

MV5BMGE0N2NkOWItMTQ3ZS00YWE4LTg5MmQtNzQx

And which NOW brings up the thing I always thought was THE most questionable aspect about this Hitchcock flick. Yep, and even MORE so than the whole idea of birds attacking humans.

(...and THIS being, why in the world would Rod Taylor pick the blonde over HER???...what was WRONG with that guy anyway?!!!)

I like both Tippi Hedren and Suzanne Pleshette both in appearance and in acting.  I think Hedren is much better in Marnie.   Pleshette has made some movies that I find most enjoyable, but has sometimes been paired with poor co-stars - Rome Adventure for one.

As for appearance, I think it has to do with the hairstyles they have in shows.  Hedren always shows too much forehead to me.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Thompson said:

Okay, now I get the thread.  Thanks, man.  Kim Novak, the one in Rear Window. Doris Day who is on TV now, oh yeah, that awful character actress in North By Northwest - how did Hitchcock move from the actresses in this film to the above mentioned.  I don’t get that.

Kim Novak was NOT in Rear Window,  that would be Grace Kelly.  Kim was in Vertigo.  And Doris Day was in the second version of The Man Who Knew Too Much.  Eva Marie Saint was in North by Northwest.  All these women were talented, beautiful actresses.   I don't mean to be all wrist-slappy and judgemental,  but honestly, Thompson, it's a pretty easy matter to look up who appeared in which Hitchcock films.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Thompson said:

Okay, now I get the thread.  Thanks, man.  Kim Novak, the one in Rear Window. Doris Day who is on TV now, oh yeah, that awful character actress in North By Northwest - how did Hitchcock move from the actresses in this film to the above mentioned.  I don’t get that.

Rear Window - Grace Kelly and North By Northwest - Eva Marie Saint.   Very good actresses, as are Pleshette and Hedren.  You must have extremely high standards for actors or is it just actresses?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had not seen Shadow of a Doubt in a long time, but did find it interesting.  Not one of my top five or so Hitchcock movies though.

One thing I found very interesting was that when Uncle Charlie arrived, he actually had four suitcases.  In too many movies, the actors arrive somewhere with one suitcase, but yet furnish very large wardrobes out of them.

I don't understand where the two detectives came from or else I missed it.  I don't think any police department would send two detectives travelling around the country looking for a murderer.  

Also interesting that he apparently carried around his money in thousand dollar bills since he gave the banker 40 $1,000 bills to deposit.  Although at the time this may have been a more common practice and he did not want to have accounts in banks where he "operated."

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Another “flaw” was everybody in the town of Santa Rosa, California, a pretty big city even back then, notice the traffic cop and the funeral turn out, Yet everybody knows young Charlie from the Librarian on down to the dive bar waitress.  Only Dargo would be so well known in his high school.  I’m looking forward to next week where the lead is an alcoholic and I can pass judgment freely and not have to look up anything on the internet.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...