Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, ElCid said:

I had not seen Shadow of a Doubt in a long time, but did find it interesting.  Not one of my top five or so Hitchcock movies though.

One thing I found very interesting was that when Uncle Charlie arrived, he actually had four suitcases.  In too many movies, the actors arrive somewhere with one suitcase, but yet furnish very large wardrobes out of them.

I don't understand where the two detectives came from or else I missed it.  I don't think any police department would send two detectives travelling around the country looking for a murderer.  

Also interesting that he apparently carried around his money in thousand dollar bills since he gave the banker 40 $1,000 bills to deposit.  Although at the time this may have been a more common practice and he did not want to have accounts in banks where he "operated."

He didn't seem to care too much about his money.  Remember the opening scenes when his landlady finds bills all over the floor, and his surroundings weren't exactly posh.  He didn't seem to spend a lot on things (other than clothes and cigars).  I'm sure it was all because he didn't want to be easily tracked, and carrying cash makes you more mobile (can pick up and leave at a moment's notice). 

The detectives in Santa Rosa weren't the same guys seen in the earlier scenes back east, but they did travel to Santa Rosa chasing after Charlie (stated as such by the detective after their first dinner date).   The newspaper article seen in the library stated there was a nationwide hunt for two men as suspects.  Perhaps it was the FBI?   

Before funds were moved around electronically, larger bills were common.  Denominations of $500, $1000, $5000 and $10,000 were available to the general public, and larger notes were available to financial institutions for the transfer of funds between them.

$40,000 in the 1940s was more money than many people would have accumulated in a lifetime, especially coming out of the Depression (over $500K today)

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

MacDonald Carey, good actor with a rich "radio" voice, always reminds me in looks of THE CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON, along with Troy Donahue.   There is just something aquatic about their faces.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

the carbon monoxide filled garage

You'd think she would have just  put the car in reverse and battered the door open pretty easily.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

MacDonald Carey, good actor with a rich "radio" voice, always reminds me in looks of THE CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON, along with Troy Donahue.   There is just something aquatic about their faces.

Hmmmmm...so Bronxie, I take it this is just an offshoot of that whole Rabbitittus thing of yours, RIGHT???

BUT, with some people looking like "fish" to ya instead of "rabbits" of course. 

(...now, I think the specific clinical term for THIS one is actually "Ichthyoritus", but don't quote me in this...I never got past the first year of med school, ya know)  ;)

 

 

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

But Uncle Charlie had removed the key.

The car was running all she had to do was put it in reverse gear, no?

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Hmmmmm...so Bronxie, I take it this is just an offshoot of that whole Rabbitittus thing of yours, RIGHT???

BUT, with some people looking like "fish" to ya instead of "rabbits" of course. 

(...now, I think the specific clinical term for THIS one is actually "Ichthyoritus", but don't quote me in this...I never got past the first year of med school, ya know)  ;)

 

 

creature-from-the-black-lagoon-gif-12.gif

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wait, a sec. Lemme compare the two of 'em here, Bronxie...

17 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

creature-from-the-black-lagoon-gif-12.gif

...and now...

macdonald-carey-3-sized.jpg

Oh Yeah! NOW I see what ya mean!

They're like TWINS separated at BIRTH!!! Especially around the nose area, huh.

(...how could I ever question you?!)  ;)

LOL

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a real fan of this one. I hold this near the bottom of all Hitchcock. It can't be the worst because i have seen Vertigo. IMO this does not fit the MO of a Hitchcock, it lacked the edginess that he was so good at. This needed a Bernard Hermann moment. It plays rather conventionally to me.  I was bored most of the time. Teresa was excellent and I like the performance of the actress who played her mother. The little girl was a hit. Early on she says, "I like to keep my mind free on things that don't matter." Wow, such wisdom from the mouths of babes. If she ever writes a self-help book, I may buy it. I did not think that Louise was a plain Jane. Speaking of edginess, she had a little of that in her face. Love those glasses, Louise, don't lose them. Dorothy Parker was wrong about that.

I hope Eddie Muller is all right. Maybe he just went on a diet.  

  • Like 4
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Uncle Charlie should be drummed out of the serial killers club for being dumb enough to keep the ring

of one of his victims that could be traced. Ms. Charlie gets it, he gets it back and instead of tossing it

out keeps it up in his room where she gets it again. Hey bub, pay a little more attention to what you're

 doing and less attention to those repetitive speeches about how behind every house there's a whole

sewerfull of nasty goings on, blah, blah, blah. But perhaps that is a part of his rather lackadaisical attitude

toward things including money, which blows the banker's mind and I always laugh at. I've mentioned this

before, but Ms. Charlie has it made. She sits on her rear most of the time between trips to town and dinner

time. Nice work if you can get it. I felt sorry for the low energy waitress in the dive. But wasn't it called

something like the two o-clock club. By the time the two Charlies come in late at night that waitress

is probably on her last legs and can't wait to get the heck out of there, good tip or not. Give the poor

girl a break. And last and least, that newspaper "house" totally sucks man.

 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

You'd think she would have just  put the car in reverse and battered the door open pretty easily.

Forward, reverse it wouldn't matter, that car would level that garage.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

 

$40,000 in the 1940s was more money than many people would have accumulated in a lifetime, especially coming out of the Depression (over $500K today)

Read that 40 K would be equivalent of over $ 1 Million today.

9 hours ago, laffite said:

Not a real fan of this one. I hold this near the bottom of all Hitchcock. It can't be the worst because i have seen Vertigo. IMO this does not fit the MO of a Hitchcock, it lacked the edginess that he was so good at. This needed a Bernard Hermann moment. It plays rather conventionally to me.  I was bored most of the time. Teresa was excellent and I like the performance of the actress who played her mother. The little girl was a hit. Early on she says, "I like to keep my mind free on things that don't matter." Wow, such wisdom from the mouths of babes. If she ever writes a self-help book, I may buy it. I did not think that Louise was a plain Jane. Speaking of edginess, she had a little of that in her face. Love those glasses, Louise, don't lose them. Dorothy Parker was wrong about that.

I hope Eddie Muller is all right. Maybe he just went on a diet.  

The girl in the glasses reminded me of Dorothy Malone in The Big Sleep.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, ElCid said:

The girl in the glasses reminded me of Dorothy Malone in The Big Sleep.

Me too.  I ran straight to IMDB! Nope, she's Estelle Jewell and according to IMDB it's her only acting roll. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/26/2021 at 6:49 PM, Stoopnagle said:

I had the opposite experience.  Growing up, I remember Julie starring in the TV show "Emergency!"  and I didn't know about her musical career until much later.   Here she is with husband and "Emergency!" co-star Bobby Troup, who I also found out later had a musical career and produced her big hit "Cry Me A River". 

Julie London Bobby Troup Emergency 1971.JPG

Head nurse DIXIE MCCALL!! :D She had about 10 lines per episode.......

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I love Shadow of a Doubt, it's one of my favourite Hitchcock films.  I've seen it many times, and each time I get something out of it.

For one thing,  all the players are perfect in their roles.  Nobody could have played Charlie, the innocent but very smart young girl who's the lead character,   as well as Teresa Wright does.  She really nails the dawning realization that her beloved uncle is not at all what she'd always adoringly thought he was -- it's a key moment in the film when she reads the article in the paper and discovers the truth about him.  Wright really captures all the complex emotions Charlie would be feeling:  denial (at first),  shock, sadness, disillusionment, horror,  disgust,  and finally, fear.  

But all the actors are good in this.  I really enjoy the ongoing "how to commit murder" conversations between Henry Travers and Hume Cronyn- they're both so funny !

Two bit players who never get mentioned,  but who in their own way really add to the flavour of the film, are  Charlie's friend Catherine -   Estelle Jewell,  never saw her in anything else, but she's hilarious as the plain Jane friend who seems ready to flirt with anyone male in sight, even Wallace Ford !  She's always smiling demurely and looking at the ground. 

Also, another peer of Charlie's,  the pretty but weary young waitress at the bar Charlie and her uncle slip into.  I think her character's name was Louise,  she was played by someone called Janet Shaw  (?)   I love it that even though she's from the same graduating high school class as Charlie, her path has taken a very different turn.  She can't get a "respectable" job, so she's waitressing at the local dive.  The way she speaks when she explains why she's working there to Charlie, and when she looks at the ring- there's a world of sadness and resignation and weariness in her voice,  even though she can't be any older than 19 or so.  She only has about 5 minutes, but they're memorable.

One thing that really struck me this time round:  Charlie knows her uncle is dangerous, that he's a killer.  And yet she clearly does not hide what she knows about  him. She cannot pretend that she feels the same way about him.   Especially after his two attempts on her life  (the broken stair and the carbon monoxide filled garage),  you have to wonder why she doesn't try to hide her fear and loathing of him.  She makes him suspect she's going to turn him in -- and she would, if not for her concern for her mother.  When she finds the incriminating ring back in Uncle Charlie's drawer, instead of keeping it to show her detective boyfriend,  she walks down the stairs and clearly reveals it to her uncle.  Why wouldn't she by this time have been fearful that any further indication from her that she is a threat to his escape will endanger her?   Of course, it makes for very dramatic cinema, I guess that's why.

It's interesting that Uncle Charlie's dark deeds all occur off-camera, before the story begins.  This way it's easier to understand why the innocent Newton family trust and like him so much.  Well, not all of them.  Just as dogs always seem to know a bad 'un one they see one,  the two kids,  especially the precocious little girl, Ann, know there's something wrong with him.

Anyway,  I understand why Eddie includes this as a noir.  It's the idea of evil lurking in the midst of goodness,  that things are not what they seem.  It's the idea of being trapped.  Not Uncle Charlie,  it's young Charlie who's trapped.  She knows her uncle's  terrible secret, but feels she can't do anything about it.  

One could make an argument that almost all Hitchcock's work in one way or another is noir  (except for Mr. and Mrs. Smith ), because there's darkness of one kind or another in so many of them.  But Hitch 's movies are in a category of their own, so I suppose if you had to say one of them was a film noir,  Shadow of a Doubt would fit the bill.

 

Yes, Janet Shaw. So good in that brief scene. I've seen her in a couple Bs but nothing else.  I think one was a Saint or Falcon movie.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ElCid said:

Read that 40 K would be equivalent of over $ 1 Million today.

The girl in the glasses reminded me of Dorothy Malone in The Big Sleep.

 

32 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

Me too.  I ran straight to IMDB! Nope, she's Estelle Jewell and according to IMDB it's her only acting roll. 

Yep, me three.

(...but Moe, I don't recall her doing any "rolling" in any scene she was in...nope, she was always standing or walking perfectly upright throughout this movie as far as I could tell)  ;)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

This go round I noticed near the very end the possible next "Merry Widow" giving Uncle Charley the eye on the train, lol

She had her eye on him from their first meeting!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Hibi said:

She had her eye on him from their first meeting!

I think their paths crossed 3 times - at the bank, where he learns she's a widow, at the house after his talk, and on the train.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wife and I just watched two Joseph Cotton "C movies."  Baron Blood and Lady Frankenstein on Shout Factory (Tubi).  Guess he needed the money.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Wife and I just watched two Joseph Cotton "C movies."  Baron Blood and Lady Frankenstein on Shout Factory (Tubi).  Guess he needed the money.

You mean they weren't good?

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, TomJH said:

You mean they weren't good?

Depends on definition of good.  A schlock movie to kill time - OK, but good by TCM standards - no way.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ElCid said:

Wife and I just watched two Joseph Cotton "C movies."  Baron Blood and Lady Frankenstein on Shout Factory (Tubi).  Guess he needed the money.

Didn't invest well..........

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ElCid said:

Wife and I just watched two Joseph Cotton "C movies."  Baron Blood and Lady Frankenstein on Shout Factory (Tubi).  Guess he needed the money.

I don't know if I would assume Cotton "needed the money".      Some people just love to work in their profession.

Here is all I could find related to this - a comment from Cotton:  "I was in a lot of junk", he admitted later. "I get nervous when I don't work."[

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting comment above.  Not about taking junk (Christopher P. once said that).  I think he said something about his castle needed heating.  But it reminded me of another actor:  I think he found it easier to lose himself in a role rather than live a troubled (in some ways), alcoholic life.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...