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Dargo, you said the Saturday night movie is on YouTube .  I’ve got YouTube on my smart **** TV, I should be able to pull it up, right?  

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2 hours ago, Thompson said:

Dargo, you said the Saturday night movie is on YouTube .  I’ve got YouTube on my smart **** TV, I should be able to pull it up, right?  

If you're referring to the Albert Finney movie Thompson, yes, it's available on YouTube.

(...and so yes, you should be able to watch it on your Smart TV)

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Thanks Dargo.  But what about the film noir coming up on Saturday night?  My ex friend the bartender and Miller High Life drinker turned me down, doesn’t want to have anything more to do with me, when I suggested we share a bottle of Jameson and watch the film at her place.  Called me fresh, which is better than stale I guess.  So now I’m on my own and by  12:30am Saturday night you can forget it.

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2 hours ago, Thompson said:

Thanks Dargo.  But what about the film noir coming up on Saturday night?  My ex friend the bartender and Miller High Life drinker turned me down, doesn’t want to have anything more to do with me, when I suggested we share a bottle of Jameson and watch the film at her place.  Called me fresh, which is better than stale I guess.  So now I’m on my own and by  12:30am Saturday night you can forget it.

If that's an offer, I can't see how Dargo can resist! 

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2 hours ago, Thompson said:

Thanks Dargo.  But what about the film noir coming up on Saturday night?  My ex friend the bartender and Miller High Life drinker turned me down, doesn’t want to have anything more to do with me, when I suggested we share a bottle of Jameson and watch the film at her place.  Called me fresh, which is better than stale I guess.  So now I’m on my own and by  12:30am Saturday night you can forget it.

Ah, so then you were referring to this coming Saturday night's edition of Noir Alley earlier, eh Thompson?!

In that case, it was Tom who earlier mentioned that Guilty Bystander was available on YouTube, not me.

(...btw, I guess you're the only regular at the bar who didn't know Glenda the bartender abhors Irish Whisky...well, at least now you know better, huh)

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Now I know better.  So can I spend 4 hours with the Smart TV and pull up the movie or not?  Might just take my cigarettes and half pint of white downtown and find me another barroom girl.  A noir girl with a sense of humor.

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My Samsung flat screen t.v. has been displaying green vertical lines for three days now.

A technician is coming Saturday.  

(I hope he doesn't look like the guy in that Joan Blondell/William Demarest Twilight Zone episode)

 

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On 6/25/2021 at 12:44 PM, ElCid said:

Body Heat should be watched with the A/C turned off.😃

Sitting in a bath tub filled with ice cubes and an old fashioned fan oscillating nearby.

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5 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

Sitting in a bath tub filled with ice cubes and an old fashioned fan oscillating nearby.

Have often wondered about that scene.  Surely they could have afforded A/C, especially if Matty is living there full-time.  Also, how many ice cubes would it take to fill a tub for two people to actually cool the water?

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2 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

Sitting in a bath tub filled with ice cubes and an old fashioned fan oscillating nearby.

EDWARD G. ROBINSON in KEY LARGO -1948-. Photograph by Album

"So who doesn't watch films that way?"

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Now, this is completely unacceptable.  This neo-noir supposedly with 4 stars?  Paul Newman in Harper based on probably the worst crime writer of the twentieth century Ross Macdonald.  This is beyond bad.  The intro was with Eddie and Ben and they both looked (as well as they certainly should) embarrassed.  I don’t know how anybody could possibly like this movie and I would like to know how in heck this got picked for a neo-noir.  

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1 hour ago, Thompson said:

Now, this is completely unacceptable.  This neo-noir supposedly with 4 stars?  Paul Newman in Harper based on probably the worst crime writer of the twentieth century Ross Macdonald.  This is beyond bad.  The intro was with Eddie and Ben and they both looked (as well as they certainly should) embarrassed.  I don’t know how anybody could possibly like this movie and I would like to know how in heck this got picked for a neo-noir.  

Well too bad for you.

Harper was the adaptation of Ross Macdonald's first Archer novel The Moving Target.

"The Moving Target" was originally set in 1949, Harper moves the action up to the 65-66 (present at the time), with the only throwback to the 50s being the robin's egg blue 1955 Porsche 356 A Speedster that Newman drives, which I also see as a nod to 1955's Kiss Me Deadly opening sequence with Meeker driving a 1950 Jaguar XK 120 Roadster.

This film is in the Classic Hollywood style of P.I. flicks, Newman's Harper is almost in the same mold as Sam Spade, and Philip Marlowe. Harper has that same quality of wisecracking cool, that's essential for your classic P.I. Though Harper doesn't drink a lot or smoke, he's more of a habitual gum chewer, the various ways he disposes of his wads are good for a few chuckles.

The plot is very convoluted but not confusing. It's got quite a few Classic Noir actors to provide some cinematic memory. If the film has one fault it's that it doesn't quite go Noir enough. Looking back Harper is a little too old fashioned for its own good, it's got a classic Hollywood score by Johnny Mandel that's too flaccid for the material, it's honestly a bit of a snooze fest. There are also a few segments that feature what's supposed to be rock bands with folks dancing to what sounds like your typical generic Hollywood hip gogo elevator music track, completely disregarding what instruments are being played on screen. This is a case where I'm spoiled by today's easy use of the real recording artists of the time used in period films.

The music also, is more reminiscent of what you would hear in that time periods comedies, so that, along with the presence of Robert Wagner just back from his signature The Pink Panther performance gives the film a bit of an off genre vibe. Had Wagner built upon his bad boy persona from his noir debut in A Kiss Before Dying with similar hardboiled fare, it may have been different. There are also some lite comedy sequences between Harper and his estranged wife Susan (Leigh).

Combine all of the above with the ambiguous ending and Harper is at best soft boiled and noir lite.

I like The Drowning Pool better.

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So I caught Warning Shot after Point Blank, I had never seen it before, It wouldn't be something I'd go out of my way to seek out but it was watchable.  

I break American Noir Style Films into Classic Hollywood Noir (1940-1959), Transitional Noir (1960-1969), and then Neo Noir. Neo Noir an be broken into Early Neo Noir (1970s), middle Neo Noir (1980s-1990s) and Late Neo Noir (post 2000)

Harper, Point Blank, and Warning Shot all fall into the Transitional Noir period. 

What happened was that during 1950s Hollywood was loosing their audiences to competition with TV. Previously the pool of dark themes and subject matter that Noir forged into stylish films, were held in check by a voluntary Motion Picture Production Code. Think of Hollywood productions under the Code as having a guardrail of violence on one side and a guardrail of sex and taboo subjects on the other.  When the Big Studio motion picture companies began to get serious competition from television, they needed an edge to get butts out of the living rooms and into the theaters they began to no longer enforce the code and to explore more previous banned subject matter. The guardrails disappeared. Then independent producers in competition with the Hollywood Studios tried to out do them by being the Avant Guard of exploiting the new freedoms. The legal challenges of, and ever changing benchmarks to the obscenity laws and the old taboo themes weakened the bulwarks of the pool and that arbitrary "dam" holding back all creativity burst out with predictable results.  

So those Film Noir that went too far over the line depicting violence started getting classified as Horror, Thriller (even though they were just say, showing the effects of a gunshot wound, or dealing with weird serial killers, maniacs, and psychotics, etc.). Those that went too far depicting sexual, drug, torture, etc., situations were being lumped into or classed as various Exploitation flicks, (even though they are relatively tame comparably to today's films). The the noir-ish films that dealt with everything else, except Crime, concerning the human condition were labeled Dramas and Suspense. Those that tried new techniques, lenses, etc., were labeled Experimental. Some films are so so bad in all aspects that they acquire the "so bad it's good" Cult status. These Film Noir I label the Transitional Noir.

 Since the 1970's all of the above in various forms and intensities can typically be part of the creative tool box used in what we call Neo Noirs. Also note that Neo Noirs have been made for roughly fifty years easily eclipsing Classic Film Noir. 

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

I break American Noir Style Films into Classic Hollywood Noir (1940-1959), Transitional Noir (1960-1969), and then Neo Noir. Neo Noir an be broken into Early Neo Noir (1970s), middle Neo Noir (1980s-1990s) and Late Neo Noir (post 2000)

I find the neo-noir interesting.  I really liked Chinatown and Klute.  Do you know if there were any neo-noir filmed in Portland or Oregon as a whole? 

I'm reading a list of neo-noir titles (on Wikipedia) that I've seen that I hadn't realized were neo noir.  I was just thinking them as "gritty dramas." 

I've also seen:

All the President's Men

Bonnie and Clyde

Cape Fear (1962)

Fatal Attraction

Midnight Lace

Ocean's 11

Play Misty for Me

The Thomas Crown Affair (1968)

---

I specifically like the gritty 1970s films.  There's just something about the aesthetic and how the films look.  All the films seem to have this flat, earth tones look that I find appealing. Do you know of any other neo-noir along the same lines of Klute, All the President's Men, and Play Misty for Me that I may enjoy? I love the "New Wave" crop of Hollywood stars that emerged during the 1960s and 1970s (Jane Fonda, Robert Redford, Faye Dunaway, etc. etc.) and I also love these films that feature Classic Hollywood stars later in their careers. 

 

Thanks!

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I like Harper and Ross McDonald (AKA Kenneth Millar - check out his wife, Margaret for some really great psychological thrillers).  I didn't care for the Drowning Pool even though we got to see Paul and Joanne together.  I also would like to know when Ben & Eddie were taped - I think it might be pre-pandemic because I seem to remember them having the conversation before.  I watched Harper (I like the cast and the film) - also good for the 7 degrees of Paul Newman thread.  I disagree with Eddie and Ben however on Paul Newman and the entering the Cool Guy phase.  First of all (and I see The Thomas Crown Affair Mentioned Above), the epitome of cool was Steve McQueen (and Bullitt (sp?) could be considered neo-noir).  One that really fits the bill for me is Body Heat (she is the femme fatale).  By the way, watch out for trusting Wikipedia.  They are not exactly known for their fact-checking.

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On 7/1/2021 at 9:36 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

My Samsung flat screen t.v. has been displaying green vertical lines for three days now.

A technician is coming Saturday.  

(I hope he doesn't look like the guy in that Joan Blondell/William Demarest Twilight Zone episode)

 

Yikes,  green vertical lines on your tv screen ?  !  That IS a sign that the aliens are coming !  I saw it on - I forget, some '50s  flying saucer movie.   Still, you should be flattered that they're contacting you first .

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I find the neo-noir interesting.  I really liked Chinatown and Klute.  Do you know if there were any neo-noir filmed in Portland or Oregon as a whole? 

I'm reading a list of neo-noir titles (on Wikipedia) that I've seen that I hadn't realized were neo noir.  I was just thinking them as "gritty dramas." 

I've also seen:

All the President's Men

Bonnie and Clyde

Cape Fear (1962)

Fatal Attraction

Midnight Lace

Ocean's 11

Play Misty for Me

The Thomas Crown Affair (1968)

---

I specifically like the gritty 1970s films.  There's just something about the aesthetic and how the films look.  All the films seem to have this flat, earth tones look that I find appealing. Do you know of any other neo-noir along the same lines of Klute, All the President's Men, and Play Misty for Me that I may enjoy? I love the "New Wave" crop of Hollywood stars that emerged during the 1960s and 1970s (Jane Fonda, Robert Redford, Faye Dunaway, etc. etc.) and I also love these films that feature Classic Hollywood stars later in their careers. 

 

Thanks!

1960s Transitional Noir -  some are going to feel like Classic Noir some are going to feel like Neo Noir. There are black comedy Noir also...

Girl Of The Night (1960)

Murder, Inc. (1960)

The Savage Eye (1960)

The 3rd Voice (1960)

Why Must I Die? (1960)

20,000 Eyes (1961)

Blast Of Silence (1961)

The Young Savages (1961)

Night Tide (1961)

Underworld USA (1961)

Something Wild (1961)

All Fall Down (1962)

Cape Fear (1962)

Experiment In Terror (1962)

Manchurian Candidate (The)(1962)

Private Property (1962)

Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962)

Satan in High Heels (1962)

Shock Corridor (1962)

Stark Fear (1962)

Twilight Of Honor (1963)

The Naked Kiss (1964)

The Pawnbroker (1964)

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Kiss Me Stupid (1964)

The Glass Cage (1964)

The Thrill Killers (1964)

Strange Compulsion (1964)

The Strangler (1964)

Angel's Flight (1965)

Brainstorm (1965)

Flesh and Lace (1965)

Hot Skin And Cold Cash (1965)

Love Statue (The)(1965)

Mirage (1965)

Once A Thief (1965)

Tell Me in the Sunlight (1965)

Who Killed Teddy Bear (1965)

Aroused (1966)

Mr. Buddwing (1966)

Seconds (1966)

Rage (1966)

Harper (1966)

In The Heat Of The Night (1967)

In Cold Blood (1967)

The Incident (1967)

The Outsider (1967) (TV movie)

Reflections in a Golden Eye (1967)

Sweet Love, Bitter (1967)

Boston Strangler (The) (1968)

The Pick-Up (1968)

Marlowe (1969)

Shame, Shame, Everybody knows your name (1969)

The Honeymoon Killers (1969)

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2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Yikes,  green vertical lines on your tv screen ?  !  That IS a sign that the aliens are coming !  I saw it on - I forget, some '50s  flying saucer movie.   Still, you should be flattered that they're contacting you first .

Yeah, to tell me that MY TELEVISION IS DEAD DEAD DEAD.

What am I gonna do??  I am heartbroken because at this time (forgive the TMI) I'm not able to purchase a new set.   

Don't know how long it will take to "die" -- could be a matter of days or weeks.  In the meantime the green vertical lines are keeping me "company" until everything goes BLACK.

Wasn't impressed with HARPER.  Paul Newman seemed to be slumming somehow.  Trying too hard to be "cool".   Robert Mitchum is cool.  Steve McQueen is cool.  Lee Marvin is cool.  Elliot Gould is cool (THE LONG GOODBYE).  Paul has always come across to me as a nice suburban kid playing at being a tough guy in a lot of his movies.  Shelley Winters and Strother Martin were just....embarrassing.   Poor Janet Leigh with -- what did Ben call them -- her "nerdy" eyeglasses.

WARNING SHOT was a hoot!   Ya gotta love a movie that has Lillian Gish and Eleanor Parker in the cast, lol.  Carroll O'Connor as a judge put on the most bizarre accent.  I couldn't figure it out.  

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Point Blank and Parker were from the novels by Richard Stark -  who wrote a plethora of Parker novels-  didn’t care for either movie - but Donald Westlake (aka Richard Stark) is a superior writer right up there with Erle Stanley Gardner, Ed McBain (aka Evan Hunter), Charles Williford, Elmore Leonard.  These boys were writers, not authors, and they excelled at dialogue - certainly a key ingredient in film noir - not cutesy dialogue, not witty dialogue, and most importantly not a hint of phony dialogue.  I take exception to Ross MacDonald and fellows like James Lee Burke because even though the story might be legit the written dialogue rings completely false.  Not of course to blame the movie’s dialogue in Harper on Macdonald, but there is a link, and the dialogue in the movie was awful.  Besides the music, which in every movie is critical, the actors cannot be reciting lines that as a viewer we find unnatural (put in an accent and even more so).  In Cold Blood is an example of a great novel made into a great Movie.  One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest another.  I can’t think of one moment in that film were the dialogue was not spot on.

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And disconnect everything associated with the TV.  Recently did you get a station that talked Spanish?  Back in the day you called the guy out and he replaced that big ol’ tv tube bulb from the back of the tv.  Now they all have computer chips like cars do.

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